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WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 



3 0399 0837361 9 



WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY 

THE Z. SMITH REYNOLDS LIBRARY 







CALL NO. 




1901-191^ 






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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/minutesofannm19011914tarr 



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SIA I:N'1 ^ -FIRST ANNUAI> SP.SSK )N 



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'^JAK J^IV'ER JjAPTIST 5\SSUC1A'I ION 

HGELD WITH 

THE CHURCH AT CORINTH, FRANKLIN COUNTY, N. C, 
OCXOBPGR 8, O ATs-o 1 0, 1901. 



THE NEXT SESSION TO BE HELD WITH THE CHUKCH IN 
WASHINGTON, N. C, COMMENCING ON MONDAY NIGHT 
. . . .AFTER THE FIRST SUNDAY IN OCTOBER, 1902. . . . 



G. T. LUMPKIN TO PREACH INTRODUCTORY SERMON. 
J. W. ROSE, ALTERNATE 



Oii^CJSlrlS 



T. M. ARRINGTON, Moderator Rocky Mount, N. C. 

A. G. WILLCOX, Clerk and Treasurer Brinkleyville, N. C. 



8JBRARY 



]M I :n^ x^ T e: s 



OF a;n:E 



SEVENTY-FIRST AN XL AT SESSION 



OF thp:; 



AR JplV^ER ^APTIST ^\SS()CIA1I0N 






THE CHURCH AT CORINTH, FRANKLIN COUNTY, N. C. 
OCXOKIGR .'-i, n Ais'D TO, If >r>l. 



THE NEXT SESSION TO BE HELD WITH THE CHURCH IN 
WASHINGTON, N. C, COMMENCING ON MONDAY NIGHT 
. . . .AFTER THE FIRST SUNDAY IN OCTOBER. 10O2. . . . 



G. T. LUMPKIN TO PREACH INTRODUCTORY SERMON. 
J. W. ROSE. ALTERNATE 



OFFICERS 

T. M. ARRIXr.TOX, Moderator Rocky Mount, X. C. 

A. O. WILLCOX, Clerk and Treasurer Erinklevville, N. C. 



The Coinmonwealth Print, 

Scotland Neck, X\ C. 

igoi. 



:M I >r 17 T E s 



OF TITE 



SEVENTY-FIRST ANXUAE SESSION 



OF xiip:; 



^RpiVliR 2aPT1ST _^rs-^S()CIA'i ion 



HELD A^'IXIi 
THE CHURCH AT CORiNTH, FRANKLIN COUNTY, N. C, 



THE NEXT ^ES>ION TO BE HELD AVITH THE CHUE( H IX 
WASHIXirmX. X. C. COMMEXCTXG OX MOXDAY XIGHT 
. . . .AFTEK THE FIRST SUXDAY IX OCTOBER. I'.iii2. . . . 



G. T. LUMPKIX Ti> PREACH IXTR(:>I)U(: TORY SER.AIOX, 
J. AV. ROSE. ALTERXATE 



OEEICERS 

T. M. ARRIXGTOX. Moderator Rocky Mount, X. C. 

A. G. WILLCOX, Clerk and Treasurer BrinkleyviHe, N. C. 



The Commonwealth Print, 
Scotland Xeck, X. C. 

1901. 



MINUTES OF THE 



Everetts— Jas. W. Rose. 

Elm Grove— A. C. Wil-. 
liams. 

Enterprise — J.T.Edniond- 
son, A. T. Barns, E. L. 
Hale. 

Eagles — J. J. Atkinson J. 
8. Farmer. 

Fishing- Creek— W. W. 
Rosser, W. O. Rosser, W. 
T. Shearin. 

Greenville— By letter. 

Gardners — W. P. Rod well, 
W. E. Rod well. 

Gethsemane — O. L. Pitt- 
man, W. T. Askew. 

Harriss Chapel — W. H. 
Mabry. 

Hobgood— W. O. Allen, 
G. C. Weeks, R. J. Shields. 

Halifax — By letter. 

Hickory— J. S. Alford, 
Fred Dozier. 

Hamilton — Jas. W. Rose. 

Henderson — J. H. Lassi- 
ter, Thos. Stewart, W. B. 
Shaw. 

Johns Chapel — J. W. B. 
Finch, L. R. Finch. 

Littleton — A. Cree. 

Lonisburg — Thos. B. Wil- 
der, Ivey Allen, E. S. Green. 

Mt. Hebron— Ed. Denton, 
A. H. Hicks, T. J. Mosley. 

Macedonia— W. E. Joy- 
ner, J. C. Taylor. 

Mildred— By letter. 

Mt. Zion— W. T. Cooper. 
W. A. Burnett, P. L. Gup- 
ton. 

Macon— T. M. Allen, H. 
A. Nicholson. 

Marmaduke— M. T. Duke, 
W. D. Gooch. 

Maple Springs— G. W. 



Strange, A. N. Perry, C. P. 
Harriss. 

Middleburg— W. H. Kim- 
ball, S. G. Champion. 

Nashville— L. M. Conyers. 

New Bethel— B. F. Stain- 
back, G. T. Askew, S. M. 
Hicks. 

New Hope — J. L. Farmer. 

North Rocky. Mt.— S. N. 
Edwards. 

Oak Level— C. J. Willi- 
ford. 

Pleasant — J. B. Coggin. 
J. W. Colston. 

Philadelphia— A. C. Grif- 
fin, G. V. Frazier. 

Peach Tree— G. A. Gard- 
ner, J. H. Hollingsworth, 
I. C. Wheless. 

Poplar Springs — J. H. 
Cheares, J. R. Wright. 

Pactolus — G. R. Satterth- 
waite, J. H. Wilson. 

Plymouth — By letter. 

Quankie — 

Rocky Mount— T. M. Ar- 
rington, E. W. Shearin, J. 
K. Howell. 

Red Oak— J. C. Real, H. 
H. Whitaker. 

Reedy Creek— W. T. Rob- 
ertson, J. J. Stallings. 

Red Bud— J. H. Griffin, 
I. H. Wood. 

Rock Spring— J. W. Whe- 
less, B. F. Wilder. 

Roanoke Rapids — G. T. 
Lumpkin. 

Sharon — By letter. 

Sulphur Springs— F. F. 
Jones, T. C. Revis. 

Stanhope — S. R. Pearce, 
Chas. Morgan. 

Spring Hope — By letter. 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 



Stony Creek — J. J. Coley, 
Cliff Ellen. 

Sandv Creek — George D. 
West, W. J. Brewer, E. M. 
Gupton. 

Samaria— J. A. Miirry. T. 
B. Cone, Bud Murry. 

Social Plains— J^ T. Al- 
ford, H. B. Hag-wood. 

Scotland Nec-k- N. Biggs, 
M. L. Kesler. 

Tarboro — B. Craig. 



Tillery— By letter. 

Turkey Branch — By letter 

Warren Plains — W. B. 
Weldon. Titus Frazier, Al- 
lie Hawks. 

Williamston — J. W. An- 
derson. 

Wilson — 

Weldon — G. T. Lumpkin. 

Washington — E. L. Daw- 
son. 

Warrenton— T. J. Tavlor. 



Roll of churches being completed the Association was 
permanently organized by the re-election of former officers: 
T. M. Arrington, Moderator; A. G. Willcox, Clerk and 
Treasurer; J. D. Hufham, Historian, and T. J. Taylor, 
Vice-Moderator. 

Committee on order of business was appointed consist- 
ing of T. J. Taylor, T. B. Wilder and A. C. Griffin. 

Bro. Forest Smith and the deacons of the church were 
appointed a committee on religious exercises. 

Roll of churches was called to ascertain the amount of 
money sent up for Associational Missions with a very 
gratifying result. 

The committee on order of business reported, which 
was adopted. 

In the absence of a report on Periodicals Bro. T. J. Tay- 
lor offered the following resolution: 

"Resolved, That we heartily recommend the Biblical 
Recorder to our people as a true exponent of Baptist prin- 
ciples and worthy of their support; we also commend the 
North Carolina Baptist, The Foreign Mission Journal, 
The Home Field, the publications of the Sunday-school 
Board, and Charity and Children, to our church people.'" 

The resolution after addresses by Brethren Bailey. Huf- 
ham, Craig, Kesler and Smith, was adopted. 

The report on Aged Ministers was read by J. E. Hocutt 
and adopted. 



MIXUTES OF THE 

Report ox ^^!f ^"^ %^ ^''^''Y ^^^§"^/,^ .?^\™ ''I 

AOED Ministers. 1^^"'^^>:-, ^^^ Psalmist said. -When 1 
am old and grey -headed lorsake me 
]iot."" To care for the aged and infirm is human and is 
carrying out the great commission which Jesus taught. 
( )ur Ministers' Relief Board is located at Durham. J. F. 
McDufifie. of Rock Springs. N. C. is the Secretary. Since 
this department of our work has been considered there 
has been a steady growth in it from year to year in con- 
tributions and the number of families who have been 
helped. Last year there were seventeen families on the 
Board. This year we have twenty-two or twenty-three 
families receiving aid from it. and there are others wlio 
ought to be on it. 

Your committee would not say one word against Mis- 
sions or Educati(^n. but we are of the opinion that in the 
efforts sometime to strain a point for other objects 
this department of our work does not receive proper con- 
sideration. The Baptists have grown — sinct^ coming to 
this country — to be a great factor for God in bringing 
the world to Clirisi". We feel to thank God for the conse- 
crated ministers who have lived and given their best days 
in preaching and planting the truths which Baptists hold 
dear. Let each church come forward with their contri- 
butions and help our aged ministers who have worn theii' 
lives away in a worthy cause. 

We recommend that a collection be taken during the 
year by all tb.e cliui'clies foi- tlie aged ministers. 

J. E. HOCUTT. 

Adjourned to meet at 1" o'clock to-morrow. Benedic- 
tion by Bro. C'l-ee. 

Wedxesdav 10 o'clock. 

Association met and spent luilf liour in devotional ex- 
ercises led by R. D. Carroll. 

Visiting brethren invited to seats among us and accept- 
ed by Bro. Dodd. of the Xoith Carolina Baptist; F. P. 
Hobgood. of tlie Flat River Association: R. D. Carroll. 
Chowan; J. AV. Bailey, and Bj-o. Jolmson. Secretary Sun- 
day-school Board. 

Houi' for special order having arrived report on Associ- 
tional Missions Avas read b\ Rev. J. I). Hufham. 



tat; rtver assoc'iatiox. 7 

-T) It is DOW twentv-three vears since the 

Kepokt on . ■ ^- + 1 ' ^1 1 1 X- 

. Association took ui) the hurden or siii)- 

ASSOCIATIONAI. 1-4.-1 +1 -^1 • 

-\r , , plymg the waste places withm oui- own 

" "' borders. Then we had scant representa- 

tion and were little known in nine counties. Then there 
were only twenty-nine churches in the Association and 
none of them was accustomed to giving on any large 
scale. Steadily we have gone forward with the greater 
work to which we had put our hands and the Lord has 
not with-held His blessing from the labors of His faithful 
servants. The churches which entered upon the work at 
first have been blessed in every department of their or- 
ganic life, and their efficiency and power have been in- 
creased an hundred fold. The mission stations where our 
brethren preached at first in court-houses, academies, 
lodge-rooms, or under brush-arbors in the woods, have 
grown into churches, worshipping in their own temples 
and contributing to every part of the Lord's vrork on the 
earth. The Association, which was obscure and little 
known, has become the foremost body of its kind in the 
State. Its fame has gone around the world and is still 
rising and spreading. All this has been done in twen- 
ty-three years. 

The year just closed has been the most prosperous peri- 
od in our history. Your committee will not cumber this 
report with the details of the year's -work. The report of 
the Treasurer of the Executive Committee will show the 
names of our missionaries, the fields v\'hich they have oc- 
cupied and the compensation which they have received. 
Their reports show that they have labored with singleness 
of heart, and also show that at every point the fa\or of the 
Lord has l>een with them. The church letters which were 
]-ead yesterday made it appear that the pledges of last 
year for the support of Associational Missions have been 
redeemed in almost every instance, and the amount of 
cash sent up to this session of your body is larger Ijy 
several hundred dollars than the contributions for any 
other 3"ear in the history of the Association. The very 
air about us is radiant with star-dust. We are called 
upon to thank Clod and press forward to larger under- 
takings. J. D. HuFHAM. Ch"m. 

The report was ably discussed by brethren. Hufham. 
Duke. Rose. Craig, after which roll of (diurches was 
called and the following amounts pledged! 



MINUTES OF THE 



Scotland iNeck S215.00 

Louisburg- 1 25. 00 

Henderson 100.00 

Stony Creek 50.00 

Rock}- Mount 50.00 

Weldon 50.00 

Washington 50.00 

W arrenton 50. 00 

Maple Springs 35.00 

Poplar Springs 35.00 

AViliiamston 35 . 00 

Tarboro 30.00 

Sharon 30.00 

Philadelphia 30.00 

Browns 25.00 

Corinth 25.00 

Dawsons 25.00 

Gardners 25.00 

Littleton 25.00 

Xew Bethel 25.00 

Red Oak 25.00 

Roanoke Rapids 25.00 

F. C. Furgerson 25.00 

Ephesus 20.00 

Bethel 20.00 

North Rocky Mt 20.00 

Reedy Creek 20.00 

Conoconara 15.00 

Elm City 15.00 

Macon.. "^ IG.OO 

Fishing Creek 15.00 

Gethsemane 15.00 

Harris Chapel 15.00 

Hobgood 15.00 

Hickory 15.00 

Hamilton 15.00 

Middleburg 15.00 

Pleasant Grove J 5 . 00 

Peach Tree 15.00 

Plymouth 1 5. 00 

Tillery 15.00 

Warren Plains 15.00 

Castalia 12.50 

Mt. Zion : 12.50 

Red Bud J2.00 



Cedar Rock $ 10.00 

Cary Chapel 10.00 

Cypress Chapel 10.00 

Everetts 10. 00 

Eagles '. 10.00 

Enterprise 10. 00 

Mildred 10.00 

Nashville 10.00 

Quankie 10.00 

Rock Spring....- 10. Oo 

Stanhope 10.00 

Sandy Creek 10.00 

Samaria •lO.OO 

E. L. Dawson 10.00 

G. M. Duke 10.00 

J. D. Hufham 10.00 

Washington S. S 10.00 

Rocky Mount S. S 10.00 

New Hope 6.00 

Antioch 5.00 

Bethlehem 5.00 

Conoho 5.00 

Elm Grove 5.00 

Mt. Hebron 5.00 

Macedonia 5.00 

Marmaduke 5.00 

Oak Level 5.00 

Pactoius 5.00 

Sulphur Springs 5.00 

Social Plains 5.00 

Turkev Branch 5.00 

A. C. Griffin 5.00 

Mrs. F. C. Furgerson 5.00 

G. T. Deans 5.00 

G. W. May 5.00 

W. M.S. Weldon 5.00 

T. P. Stewart 5.00 

W. M.S. Maple Spgs. 5.00 

Geo. Dickie 5.00 

Mrs. Geo. Dickie 5.00 

Red Oak 5.00 

T. W. Picket, paid ... 5.00 

J. R. Wright 5.00 

John Harper 5.00 

J. D. Hufham 5.00 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 9 

A. G. Willcox $5.00 Mrs. A. C. Griffin $1.0o 

Johns Chapel 3.00 Miss Venie Wilson 1.00 

J. E. Hociitt 2.50 Mrs. Williams l.OO 

Isunbeams VVeidon 3.00 i,ir a o ■ a a ^ ,„> 

J s, Beal > 2.50 Maple bprmgs to. S 1.00 

Mrs'. Lucy Uzzle 2.00 Enterprise S. S l.Oo 

Sandy Greek M. S 2.00 Mrs. M. T. Wilder 1.00 

Ladies, Peach Tree 2.00 Mrs. Ingram, paid 1.00 

M. S. Roanoke Rapids.. 2.00 William Shearin, paid. .50 

W. H. Abernathy 2.00 Riverside S. S.... 1.00 

J. R. Coggin " 2.00 J. J. Draper 1.00 

Cash 1.00 Mrs. G. W. Collins 1.00 

G. T. Lumpkin, paid.... 1.00 Weldon M. S l.Oo 

Cypress Chapel 1.00 

E. W. Green, paid 1.00 Total $1,812.50 

Report adopted. 

The committee on time, place and preacher for the 
meeting of the next Association was appointed, consist- 
ing of T. J. Taylor, L. M. Conyers and J. W. Rose. 

Committee on the digest of church lettei'S was appoint- 
ed consisting of J. S. Farmer, B. Craig and W. B. Daniel. 

Prayer by Bro. Stradley. Adjourned for dinner. 

Wednesday at 2 p. m. 

Met and led in prayer by Bro. Hocutt. T. M. Arring- 
ton was elected delegate to the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion; A. G. Wilcox alternate. J. D. Hufham, G. M.Duke 
and Noah Biggs elected delegates to the Baptist State 
Convention. 

The Treasurer of the Executive Committee offered his 
report, which was referred to E. W. Timberlake to audit. 

Tar River Baptist Association, 

1900 To N. Biggs. Treasurer. 

Oct. 1. To am"t due me this day $140.71 

1901. 

Sept. ]. To (.'ash Rev. A. Cree 40.00 

G. W. Coppedge... 40.00 

A. G. Willcox"^. 40.00 

B. K. Mason 87.50 

B. Craig 225.00 



To amount carried forward $573.21 



10 MINUTES OF THE 

To amouut brought forward S573. 21 

1901. 

Sept. 1, To Cash Rev. G. L. Merrell 150.00 

J. S. Farmer 175.00 

J. E. Hutson 24.00 

J. W. Rose 75.00 

G. G. O'Neal 50.00 

G. T. Lumpkin 83.33 

J. S. Cor-oening.... 200.00 

J. M. Page 112.50 

T. S. Crutchfiekl... 75.00 

1901. 

Oct. 1. By am't from Association $1,473.68 

Littleton church... 27.00 

Roanoke Rapids.... 12.00 

L. W. Bagley . 10.00 

Bethlehem 4.75 

Miss Eagles 5.00 

Sunbeams, Tarboro 5.00 

Oct. 1. To balance in Treasury.... $19.39 

$1,537.43 $1,537.43 

1901. 

Oct. 1. By balance in Treasury $19.39 

The undersigned, appointed to audit account of Noah 
Biggs, reports that he has audited said account and found 
it correct. E. W. Timberlake, Auditor. 

Special order for the hour being State Missions the re- 
port was offered by Bro. Kesler as follows: 

„ For more than a quarter of a century the 

^ * ' call to State Missions has been the rallying 

i.T^cT-, - ^^T for the hosts of North Carolina Bap- 

Missio^s. ^jg^g Q^^ forefathers did this work, and 

did it with a spirit of heroic self-sacrifice unsurpassed in 
the annals of missionary endeavor, but they did not call 
it by any name. We are better organized now, but they 
have bequeathed to us an example of love to God and de- 
votion to their fellowmen that we hold as a priceless 
heritage. These monuments of past toil and sacrifice are 
looking down upon us as we stand in the clearer light and 
in the presence of greater opportunities. During this 
year's work, that will be wound up with the Convention 
at AVinston, we are called upon to do the largest things 
ever done in State Missions. 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 



11 



The work has been planned on a basis of $25,000. After 
the State Board had met and made the appropriations it 
transpired that we were about $5,000 in debt. The ap- 
propriations had been made and the missionaries were on 
their fiekls. They could not be recalled. We can safely 
say that this unfortunate business tangle can ha,rdly ever 
occur again in our history. But this debt must be met. 
We have the ideal condition to hear the true ring of Bap- 
tist metal. 

From now until the Convention we must raise $ 

in order to meet our obligations — to pay for hard and 
glorious work that has already been done. Our Secre- 
tary, Brother Livingston Johnson, asks the Tar River 
Association to raise $500 of this amount. 

We urgently and confidently recommend that this 
amount be jjrovided for here and now. 

M. L, Kesi.er, Com. 

After discussion the roll of churches was called for 
pledges to be paid by November 30th, and the churches 
responded as follows: 



Browns $ 5.00 

Bethel 3.00 

Corinth 3.00 

Conoconara 5.00 

Cedar Rock 2.00 

Gary Chapel 2.50 

Cypress Chapel 1.00 

Conoho 1.00 

Castalia 2.00 

Ephesus 2.00 

Elm Citv 3.00 

Everetts 2.00 

Eagles 2.00 

Enterprise 2.50 

Fishing Creek 2.00 

Gardners 5 . 00 

Gethsemane 5.00 

Harris Chapel 2.00 

Hobgood 4.00 

Hamilton 3.00 

Henderson 25.00 

Littleton 5. 00 

Louisburg 25. 00 

Macedonia 1.00 



Mildred $ 5.00 

Mount Zion 2.5o 

Macon 2. Oo 

Marmaduke 2.(0 

Middleburg 3.00 

Nashville 2.00 

New Hope 5.00 

North Rocky Mount... 3.00 

Oak Level..". 1.00 

Pleasant Grove 2.00 

Philadelphia 5.00 

Peach Tree..... 1.00 

Pa ctolus 1 . 00 

Rocky Mount 15.00 

Red Oak 5.00 

Reedy Creek 2.00 

Roanoke Rapids 10.00 

Red Bud 2.00 

Rock.y Springs, paid... 1.00 

Sharon 5.00 

Stony Creek 5.00 

Sandy Creek 2.00 

Social Plains 1.00 

Scotland Neck 50.00 



10 MINUTES OF THE 

To amount brought forward 8573.21 

1901. 

Sept. 1. To Cash Rev. G. L. Merrell 150.00 

J. S. Farmer 175.00 

J. E. Hutson 24.00 

J. W. Rose 75.00 

G. G. O'Neal 50.00 

G. T. Lumpkin 83.33 

J. S. CorDening.... 200.00 

J. M. Page 112.50 

T. S. Crutchfield... 75.00 

1901. 

Oct. 1. By am't from Association $1,473.68 

Littleton church... 27.00 

Roanoke Rapids.... 12.00 

L. W. Bagley 10.00 

Bethlehem 4.75 

Miss Eagles 5.00 

Sunbeams, Tarboro 5.00 

Oct. 1. To balance in Treasury..! |19.39 

$1,537.43 $1,537.43 

1901. ~~ 

Oct. 1. By balance in Treasury $19.39 

The undersigned, appointed to audit account of Noah 
Biggs, reports that he has audited said account and found 
it correct. E. W. Timberlake, Auditor. 

Special order for the hour being State Missions the re- 
port was offered by Bro. Kesler as follows: 
rj For more than a quarter of a century the 

Statf '"^ ^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^ Missions has been the rallying 
\r OQ " T ■ cry for the hosts of North Carolina Bap- 

31ISSIUISS. ^.g^g Q^^ forefathers did this work, and 

did it with a spirit of heroic self-sacrifice unsurpassed in 
the annals of missionary endeavor, but they did not call 
it by any name. We are better organized now, but they 
have bequeathed to us an example of love to God and de- 
votion to their fellowmen that we hold as a priceless 
heritage. These monuments of past toil and sacrifice are 
looking down upon us as we stand in the clearer light and 
in the presence of greater opportunities. During this 
year's work, that will be wound up with the Convention 
at Winston, we are called upon to do the largest things 
ever done in State Missions. 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 



11 



The work lias been planned on a basis of 825,000. After 
the State Board had met and made the appropriations it 
transpired that we were about $5,000 in debt. The ap- 
propriations had been made and the missionaries were on 
their fields. They could not be recalled. We can safely 
say that this unfortunate business tangle can hardly ever 
occur again in our history'. But this debt must be met. 
Vie have the ideal condition to hear the true ring of Bap- 
tist metal. 

From noAv until the Convention we must raise 8 

in order to meet our obligations — to pay for hard and 
glorious work that has already been done. Our Secre- 
tary, Brother Livingston Johnson, asks the Tar River 
Association to raise .^500 of this amount. 

We urgently and confidently recommend that this 
amount be provided for here and now. 

M. L. Keslee. Com. 

After discussion the roll of churches was called for 
pledges to be paid by November 30th, and the churches 
responded as follows: 



Brown? S 5. 00 

Bethel 3.00 

Corinth 3.00 

Conoconara 5,00 

Cedar Rock 2 . uo 

Cary Chapel 2.50 

Cypress Chapel 1,00 

Conoho l.Ou 

Castalia 2.00 

Ephesus 2.00 

Elm City 3.00 

Everetts 2.00 

Eagles 2.00 

Enterprise 2.5') 

Fishing Creek 2.00 

Gardners 5, 00 

Gethsemane 5.00 

Harris Chapel 2.00 

Hobgood 4.00 

Hamilton 3.00 

Henderson 25.00 

Littleton 5. 00 

Louisburg 25.00 

Macedonia LOO 



Mildred s 5.00 

3iount Zion 2.5o 

Macon 2. 00 

^larmaduke 2.' 

Middleburg 3.00 

Nashville 2. 00 

New Hope 5.00 

North Rocky Mount... 3.00 

Oak Level. .^ l.OO 

Pleasant Grove 2,00 

Philadelphia 5.00 

Peach Tree 1.00 

Pp ctoius 1 . 00 

Rocky Mount 15.00 

Red Oak 5. 00 

Reedy Creek 2.00 

Roanoke Rapids 10.00 

Red Bud 2,00 

Rocky Springs, paid... 1,00 

Sharon 5,00 

Stony Creek 5.00 

Sandy Creek 2 , 00 

Social Plains 1.00 

Scotland Neck 50. 00 



12 MINUTES OF THE 

Tarboro §10.00 Warrenton $10.00 

Warren Plains 5.00 W. M. S., Weldon 3.00 

Williamston 8.00 Battleboro 2.00 

Weldon 50.00 L. Knott, paid 1.00 



Washing-ton 10.00 

Total $347.50 

After which the report was adopted. 

The hour for the report on Education having arrived 
the Twentieth Century Educational Movement was very 
ably discussed by J. W. Bailey and Rev. J. D. Hufham, 
after which Bro. Hufham offered a resolution that each 
pastor and delegate during the next six months bring the 
question of raising funds for education before their 
churches and endeavor to raise as much as possible for 
this purpose. The resolution was unanimously adopted 
by a rising vote. 

The committee on time, place and preacher for the next 
Association reported: Washington the place, Tuesday 
after the first Sunday in October, 1902, as the time, and 
Braxton Craig to preach the introductory sermon with J. 
W. Rose as alternate. The report was adopted. 

Report on Orphanage was read by Bro. Smith, further 
consideration of which was postponed. 

REPORT After its sixteen years of history the 

^ Thomasville Orphanage can with confi- 

Q dence come before the people and ask for a 

' ^ " hearing. Our work has grown until now 
we are taking care of 220 orphans. We are getting more 
and more upon a solid basis. The number of houses has 
increased until we have sixteen brick buildings on the 
grounds. The policy of the management now is to put 
up a better grade of buildings and to make the arrange- 
ment of rooms and apartments such as to give the very 
best facilities for the phj^sical and moral development of 
the children placed in our care. But while these im- 
provements are being made we are striving for the wisest 
economy in the people's money. 

The average cost of maintaining an orphan for the past 
year was $4.38 per month, and this includes not simply 
food and clothing and doctor's bills and medicines, but 
their schooling and paying the preacher to preach for 



TAE RIVER ASSOCIATION. 13 

them. And the orphanage in this estimate cliarges itself 
with the supplies raised on the farm. 

We believe the work done in the school rooms there is 
not surpassed by any graded school in the State. Our 
great need now is larger and better dormitory buildings. 
The people are ready to care for these fatherless ones as 
fast as room is made for them. There are perhaps 5,000 
orphans in North Carolina that ought to be cared for bj^ 
the Baptists, but we have not where to put them. May 
we not express the hope that the Lord is laying it upon 
the hearts of many of his people to provide more liberal 
things for this great work? 

Executive committee for the next year was appointed 
as follows: jSToah Biggs, E. W. Timberlake, J. W. An- 
derson, E. W. Shearin, E. L. Dawson, T. J. Taylor, T. B. 
Wilder, and by special motion the Moderator was added. 

Adjourned with prayer by Bro. Lumpkin. 

Thursday 10 a. m. 

The Association upon re-assembling spent half hour in 
religious exercises led by Bro. Cree. Minutes of yester- 
day read and adopted. 

It was moved by Bro. T. J. Taylor that Article III of 
the Constitution be changed, dropping Vice-Moderator. 
Carried. 

Keport on Home Missions was read by Bro. Smith, and 
after discussion by Bro. Lumpkin was adopted. 

Rfport ov "^^^^ Home Mission Board is located in 

TT '' Atlanta, Ga. Its present Secretary is Dr. 

Mission-' ^' ^' M<^'C^onnell. In the last three or four 

years this Board has gone through the try- 
ing ordeal of having to change Secretaries twice. But 
with all these difficulties the Board has steadily gained 
in contributions and in effective work. This Home Mis- 
sion work is foundation w^ork. The efficiency here de- 
termines what we will do abroad. If we strengthen our 
work at home we will do greater things away from home. 
Xearly all our strong churches in the Southern Baptist 
Convention were at some time in their history aided by 
this Board. It is still making weak churches strong ones. 
Besides the Board joins hands with our State Board in 
lielping them grapple with the probleins which they are 



14 MINUTES OF THE 

unable to manage by themselves. The Home Board 
works in Cuba, on the frontiers, in the mountains and in 
many cities where they are unable to take care of them- 
selves. AVe commend this work to our churches and 
urge that each church take at least one collection per 
3^ea-r for this work. Very truly, 

Forrest Smith. 

By a motion made by Bro. Craig a.nd carried the time 
»>f meeting for next session was changed to Monday night 
after the first Sunday in <)ctober, and Bro. G. T. Lump- 
kin to preach the introductory sermon. 

Report on Orphanage was further considered, and after 
discussion and a cash collection amounting to $46.20, re- 
port was adopted. 

In the absence of a report on Sunday-schools Bro. L. 
Johnson, Secretary Sunday-school Board, made a thrill- 
ing speech. 

Bro. Lumpkin read report on Foi'eign Missions as follows: 

Peport on ^^^^ key-note to Foreign Missions was 

,i^ ' struck when our Lord gave the commission 

^r ,_," /*_, — the command — to ''Go into all the world 

^ ^''^ * '^^ and preach the gosi>el to every creature." 

Before a larger enterprise can be laid before men a larger 
world will have to be made — indeed the commission 
would still include it all. 

The boldness and assurance of the command ought to 
insi)ire us to action. It takes it for granted, v/ithout the 
need of argument, that the gospel of Jesus Christ is suit- 
ed to mankind ever}' where and in every age; that it 
answers Avithout hesitation the deepest need of the uni- 
versal human heart. And then it does not breathe the 
suggestion of possible failure, for it is lixed that the 
Father will give to His Son the heathen for His inherit- 
ance and the uttermost parts of the earth for His posses- 
sion. ''He shall send forth judgment unto victory." We 
cannot ask for more €;ncouragement from God's word, and 
the history of missions is the book of the Acts of the 
Apostles continued up to date. 

When we undertake t(j obey this command we link oui-- 
selves on to the Infinite in His greatest puipose for the 
world so far as we can know it. What is needed is the 
application of these declarations. More consecration. 



TAK RIVER ASSOCIATION. 15 

more of the spirit of sacrifice, more love for the Master 
who laid down His life for us must characterize God's 
people before this work will be done. What is most 
needed throughout North Carolina, and jjarticularly in 
our Association, is a deepening of the real mission spirit. 
For two years this body has set itself to try for |] ,000 to 
be used in sending the gospel to the heathen. 

We are improving, but last year we raised only a little 
more than half the amount. There are thirty-eight 
churches in the Tar Kiver Association that did not give a 
cent to Foreign Missions last year. This is a strange and 
sad announcement. It is hard to understand how a 
church would fail to respond to the call to send the gos- 
pel to the heathen when it is presented by a faithful pas- 
tor. If he does not do it he has not preached the whole 
gospel. No church is growing that is not growing in in- 
terest for Foreign Missions. 

We repeat the recommendation that we raise during 
the year $1,000 for this object; and that to bring this 
about every pastor be requested to preach once a year at 
least on Foreign Missions in every church and take a col- 
lection for that object. M. L. Kesler, Com. 

The report was discussed by brethren Taylor and 
Lumpkin and adopted. 

Bro. Forrest Smith offered the following, which was 
adopted: 

Resolved, That it is the desire of this Association that 

Bro. T. J. Taylor shall appoint and arrange as many of 

those missionary meetings in the churches during the 
next year as he shall see best. 

Resolution by Bro. Crutchfield adopted by a rising vote: 

Resolved, That the Association extend a vote of hearty 
thanks and appreciation of the abundant hospitality 
which Corinth church and community have given to all 
who have attended. 

It was ordered for the Clerk to have the usual number 
of Minutes printed and receive the usual compensation. 

' The Treasurer offered his report which was audited by 
Bro. M. L. Kesler. 



j 6 minutes of the 

receipts. 
Tar River Association, 

In Account with A. G. Vv illcox, Treas. 
Oct. 10, 1900. 
Received of Finance Committee for 

State Missions $ 9.03 

Foreign Missions 60.77 

Home Missions 2.96 

Education 47. 88 

Orphanage 30.90 

Aged Ministers 19.37 

Minutes 77. 01 

Cash collection Associational Missions 66.25 

" Orphanage 30.00 

State Missions 21.65 

Sharon church, Associational Missions 25.00 

Minutes -... 1.00 

Enterprise church Associational Missions 15. Oo 

Minutes * .50 

Lev}^ Perkinson, Associational Missions 2.50 

Littleton church. Minutes 1.00 

Henderson, Minutes 2. 5< > 

Bethlehem. Associational Missions.. 4.75 

Minutes 50 

Total $409.92 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Oct. 10. 1900. 

To am"t due last session :|^ .40 

B}^ am't paid J. D. Boushall for State Missions 9.03 

Foreign Missions... 60.77 

Home Missions 2.95 

Education 47.88 

Orphanage 30.90 

Aged Ministers 10.73 

By paid N. Biggs cash collection Associa'l Missions 66.25 

from Bethlehem " •' 4.75 

Sharon ch •' '• 25.00 

Enterprise " " 15.00 

L. Perkinson •' •' ■ 2.50 

J. B. Boone cash collection for Orphanage 30.00 

J. E. White •' *• '• State Mis... 21.69 



Amount carried fo]-ward $327.85 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 17 

Amount brought forward $327. 85 

By paid E. E. Hilliard ptg. and distrib'g Minutes... 50. UO 

Clerks fee 25.00 

Stationery, mailing manuscript, etc .55 

Blank church letters and mailing to clerks 1.15 

Total $404.55 

To balance due Association this day 5.37 

Total $409.92 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. G. WiLLCOX, Treas. 

I have examined A. G. Willcox's account as Treasurer 
of the Association and find it correct. 

M. L. Kesler, Auditor. 

Report on Obituaries was ordered to be printed without 
readijig. 

R po ON Since our last Association I am sorry to 

^ report that many of our people have been 

UBITUARIE& p^iig^i home. Many links in the chain that 
binds our hearts together in Christian fellowship have 
been broken. Many a time with sad hearts we have stood 
by the open grave and said the last sad words. Especial- 
ly has this been true on Bro. Forrest Smith's field. It is 
a sad pleasure to offer this tribute of respect in memory 
of those long loved and lost, many of whom were leading 
lights among us. Prominent among those who have died 
are : 

Rev. G. W. Newell, of Mapleville. He was educated at 
Wake Forest College and Louisville, Ky. Married Sister 
Coppedge. Professed Christ in the army. Bro. Newell 
served churches at Wilson, Cedar Rock, Maple Springs, 
Fishing Creek, Peach Tree, Pleasant Grove and others. 
Represented his county in the Senate. Bro. Newell was 
an earnest, consecrated man and was useful in his day, 
and was highly appreciated for his faithful life. 

Rev. G. N. Bray, Henderson, N. C, was born in Hert- 
ford county, 1872, died June 1901. Educated at Wake 
Forest College and Louisville Seminary. His sun went 
down at midday of a useful life. He was a young man 
of great promise, and already a good preacher. Cut off 
in the bloom of life, yet he had lived to serve his genera- 
tion well. 



18 MINUTES OF THE 

Brethren J. P. Timberlake andJeff Stokes. These were 
consecrated members ol Louisburg church. 

Sister Lizzie Powell Wilson and Louis L. Jones, of 
Corinth Baptist church. 

Sisters Columbia Crudup, Bettie Freeman and Mamie 
Thrower. These were all consecrated members of the 
church. 

Warrenton church mourns the death of brethren Geo. 
W. Harper, Lawrence McDowell, Jacob Parker, C. N. 
Harris; and Sisters George W. Harper, Sarah E. Jenkins. 
Mattie Curl Reams, and Christina Harris. These all died 
in the faith and have gone to their reward. 

In addition we report the names of Bettie Sherrill, of 
Hickory: Luna Neil, of Mt. Zion; Fannie Steed and J. B. 
Cobb, of Red Oak; Emlie Wheeless, of Spring Hope; H. 
G. Leonard and Wm. Wheeless, of Philadelphia; R. O. 
Cutchin, Mrs. N. R. Daughtridge, J. D. Vester, of Ephesus; 
J. M. Neal, of Battleboro; B. F. Drake, and manj^ others 
whom we would be glad to mention, but it would make 
the report too long. These all died in the faith, many of 
them useful workers in the churches. 

These deaths call upon us all to live nearer to God and 
to ever keep our lamps burning, for we know not when 
the Master cometh. We bid them a sad good-bye. It is 
His will. It is God's way. 

Submitted by Committee, 

Geo. M. Duke. 

Committee on Digest of Church letters reported, which 
was adopted. (See report on page 20.) 
Finance committee reported as follows: 

Your Finance Committee submit the following report: 
We have received for 

Associational Missions $1,598.81 

Foreign Missions 36.32 

Home Missions 12.67 

State Missions 33.19 

Educatton 80.00 

Orphanage 22.71 

Ministerial Relief 17.47 

Minutes 74.36 

Total $1,875.53 

IvEY Allen, for Com. 

The report was adopted. 



TAK RIVER ASSOCIATION. 



r.i 



••Blest be the Tie that Binds*" was sung and a fervent 
prayer was offered by W. B. Morton and the ?vloderatoi- 
declared the Association adjourned to meet with the 
church in Washing'ton Monday night after the first Sun- 
day in October. 1902. T. M. ARRINGTOX. Mod. 

A. (t. WILLCOX. Clerk. 




20 



MINUTES OF THE 



DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS 
Comparing the work of 1900 with that of 1901. 



CHURCHES. 



«• 


u 






V 


<u 






E 


J3 


(LI 










u 








>. 


2 


U 


u 1 








V 


1900 


1901 




Q 



Pi 

1900 



Antioch 

Bear ^wamp 
Battleboro 
Browns. . . 
Bethlehem 

Bethel 

Cedar Rock 
Cedar Branch 

Castalia 

'onoho 

Corinth 

Crocker's Chapel 
Cypiess Chapel 
Conoconara 
Gary's Chapel 

Dawson 

Elm City 

Enfield 

Enterprise 
Elm (Jrove 
Ephesus 

Eajiles 

Fishing Creek 

Greenville 

Gardners 

Gethsemane 

Halifax 

Hickory 

Hob>cood 

Harriss Chapel 

Hamilton 

Henderson 

John's Chapel 

Littleton 

TvOuisburg 

Macon 

Macediinia 

Marniaduke 

Maple Sprin; 

Mount Hebron 

Mount Zion 

Mi idleburg 

Mildred 

North Rocky Mount 

New Bethel 

New Hope 

Nashvill 

Oak Level 

i'actolus 

Peach Tree 

Plymouth 

Philadelphia 

Poplar Springs 

Pleasant (jro\e 

Everetts 

Quankie 
Rock Springs 
Red Oak 
Rocky Mount 
Roanoke Rapids 
Reedy Cieek.. . 




33.66 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 21 

DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS— Continued. 



CHURCHES 




Red Bud 

Stoiiev Creek 

Sharon 

Samaria 

Sandy Creek 

Scotland Neck 

Sulphur Sprinj. 

Spring Hope 

Stanhope 

Social Plains 

Tillery 

Tarboro 

Turkey Branch 

Williamston 

Warren Plains 

Wilson 

Washington 

Warrenton 

Weldon 



Total 8,054! 8,615! 717 156 $29,539-04 4832,297-871 5.467-53 2,708.70 

Sevent}^ churches reported this year against sixty-six 
last year. Thirty-four churches report an increase in 
membership of 717. Nine report the same as last year. 
Twenty-seven report a decrease in membership of 156. 
Net increase 561. Thirty-five churches report increase in 
contribution .$5,467.53. Two report same as last j^ear. 
Thirty-three report decrease in contribution $2,708.70. 
Net increase in contribution $2,758.83. Ten churches 
make no report. Three churches — Bethlehem, Henderson 
and Plymouth — have not reported to the Association in 
two years. Bethlehem, Henderson and Battleboro sent 
reports after Association. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. S. Farmer, ] 

> Com. 



Braxton Craig, 
W. B. Daniel, 



P. S. — Since above Browns, Everetts and Halifax have 
reported, showing a net increase of 4 members and $60.01, 
making a net increase of 565 members and $2,818.84. 



22 



MINUTES OP THE 



PLEDGES. 



CHURCHES. 



Antioch 

Browns 

Battleboro 

Bethel 

Bear Swamp 

Bethlehem 

Corintn 

Conoconar a 

Cedar Rock 

Crocker s Chapel .... 

Gary's Chapel 

Cedar Branch 

Cypress Chapel 

Conoho 

Castalia 

Dawson 

tphesus 

Elm City 

Enfield 

Everetts 

Elm Grove 

Eagles 

Ei'terprise 

Fishing Creek 

Greenville 

Gardners 

Gethsemane 

Harriss Chapel 

Hobgood 

Halifax 

Hickory 

Hamilton 

Henderson 

John's Chapel 

Littleton 

Louisburg 

Mt. Hebron 

Macedonia 

Mildred 

Mt. Zion 

Macon 

Marmaduke 

Mapie Springs 

Middleburg 

Nashville 

New Bethel 

New Hope, 

North Rocky Mount. 

Oak Level 

Pleasant Grove 

Philadelphia 

Peach Tree 

} oplar Springs . .. 

Hymoulh 

I aclolus 

tuankie 

Kocky Mount 

Fed Oak 

Reedy Creek 

Roanoke Rapids — 

Red Bud 

Rock Spring 

fa. aron 

Sulphur Springs 



B 



C m 



5.00 

25.00 



15.00 
10.50: 



.80 



SS 



tn 























c 



be 


0) 




en 


us 


.2 












V 


v^ 





« 


•a '5 


3 




3 
•0 


a 


be 


.E 


t/. 


W 





< 


<5 



25.00 

]5.oo| 
13.00 



2.69 
10.00 
25.00 
15.00 
15.00 
30.00 



2.50 

1-25 



5.00 

10.00 

13.00 

12.00 

25.00 
25.00 
15.00 

10.00 

15.24 

6.00 
12.60 

15.00 



9.00 
1. 00 



2.50 
25.00 
100.00 

2.00 

5-00 
10.00 
12.50 
16.00 

7.00 

22.45 

21.00 
10.00 
20.25 

6.00 
20.00 

8.00 
15.00 
30.00 
24.00 
35-00 



5-00 



16.00 
' 2.62 



5.00 
-75 



4.00 
1. 00 



I. 00 3.05 3.50 



3-00 
5.00 



1.9: 



5.00 
15.00 



2.63 



52.50 
25.00 
20.00 
13.14 
12.50 
20.00 
25.00 
«;.co 



2.50 
2.00 
1. 00 



.75 



1.65 



5.00 
5-0O 



2.50 
2.00 



2.50 



2.35j 
2.00 



.25 
1. 00 



1. 00 
•50 



1.50 
1. 00 
1.50 



■75 
1-25 
1. 00 

.50 

1-25 



1.50 
1. 00 
•25 
•50 

1-25 

.50 

1-25 
I.OO 



1-25 

•50 
.70 

I.OO 



I.OO 
I.OO 



•75' 

2.00 
.80 
■50 
.50 

I.OO 

■75 
.60 
1.50 

I.OO 

.85 

1.60 

•50 

I.OO 

.75 
1.50 

l.IO 

1.40 
2.00 



I.OO' 



2.50 

I -SOI 

I.OO 

1. 281 

t.So! 
■751 



7.6,^ 



55-W" 
29.06 
23. i.^ 
16.14 
i6.2S 

2I.8ti 

25-7.'^ 



TAR RIVEK ASSOCIATION. 



23 



PLEDGES— Continued. 



! -5 
1 c • 
1 o g 

CHURCHES. 1 o <g 

< 


en 



u 


(1, 


'm 



X 


Staie 

Missions. 

Education. 


4; 

a 

c 

"3. 



u 

'c 


i 

'•75 
2.00 
1.50 
1.50 

1-55 
•50 
2.50 
1. 00 
•30 
•25 

1-25 
1-25 


Total. 


Stanhope 

Stony Creek 

Sandy Creek 

Spring Hope 


8.00 
32.00 
4-94 
6.50 
12.50 


1.44 


1.79 


2.41 


2.50 
2.50 
2.50 






8.75 
36.50 
16.80 
10.50 
14.05 

8 00 


2.22 










1. 00 


1.00 




Scotland Neck ; 215.00 






....■^° :::;:;:: 


217.5& 














Tillery 


15.00 

4.50 

15.00 

36.25 














J5-30 
4.75 
16.25 

43-77 


Turkey Branch 






























2.15 




4.12 




Weldon ! 35.00 














1.50 
1.50 

2.00 


36.50 
61.50 
52.00 
















50.00 

1. 00 

25.00 














Mt. Hebron Sunbeams. .. 




















25.00 
5-00 
5.00 




.:::;;i::::.. 













.Andrew Gardner ; 5.00 

Mrs W.B.Daniel : 5.00 

Sandy Creek Miss. So... i 2.00 

New Bethel S. S ] 2.00 

L.M.Edwards \ 2.50 

B.C. Alford 1 100 












































2.50 






























2.00 
2.50 
















J. W. Sledge ; 5.00 














5.00 
2.50 
















E W Moore 


1. 00 
1. 00 














\V J. Wilder 






.... 


1 • 








VV. W. Rosser 


2.50 
















.I.W.Rose 5.00 

G. W. Coppedge 2.50 

G W May c nn 
















5.00 
2.50 
































5-00 
















5.00 




































W M S., Gardners Ch. . 200 








1 








Sunbeams , Poplar Spgs . . 5.00 
W. M.S., Poplar Springs 5.00 
Mrs. J. H. Uzzell 500 
















































J. P. Ellen 


3.00 
















3.00 
5-00 


W. E. Barkley 
























5-65 










s6 


Total 



















1,598-81 


36 32 


12.67 


28.14 


80, CO 


22.71 


.7.47 


74-36 


1,871.4s 



^ 



24 



MINUTES OF THE 



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TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 



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20 



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TAR KIVEK ASSOCIATION. 



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TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 



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30 MINUTES OF THE 

RULES OF DECORUM. 



Believing' it best to be governed b}^ certain rules and 
regulations in conducting the business of this Associa- 
tion, we adopt the following : 

1. The Association shall be opened and closed with 
prayer. 

2. Not more than one person shall speak at a time, who 
shall rise from his seat and address the Moderator. 

3. The person thus speaking shall not be interrupted, 
unless he violates some rule of decorum. 

4. The person speaking shall adhere strictly to the sub- 
ject, and in nowise reflect on any other brother. 

5. No brother shall absent himself from the Association 
without obtaining' jjermission fi'om the body. 

0. No brother shall speak more than twice on the same 
subject without unanimous consent. 

7. No person shall whisper while a brother is speaking. 

8. The names of the delegates shall be enrolled by the 
Clerk, and called as often as the Association requires. 

0. The Moderatoi' may give his ideas on amy subject 
before putting it to the vote, but is en'titled to vote only 
in case of a tie. 

10. An order of business shall be made at the begin- 
ning of each session, and shall be changed only b}' vote 
of the bodv. 

oonstitui:t( )N. 



1 . The Association shall be composed of the pastors and 
of the members chosen by the churches who shall pro- 
duce letters certifying their appointment. Members thus 
chosen and convened, together with the pastors, shall be 
denominated The Tar Kivek Baptist Association, 
which shall have no power over the churches, nor shall it 
infringe on any of their rights. 

2. The letters from the churches shall contain the num- 
ber then in follow ship and of those baptized, received by 
letter, dismissed, excluded and died since last Associa- 
tion. 

3. Tlie officers of the Association shall be a Moderator, 
Clerk, Treasurer and Historian, who shall be chosen by 
the suffrages of the members present. 

4. Other churches, upon petition by letter and by dele- 
gates, and after a safisfactory examination of their Ar- 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 31 

tides of Faith, may be admitted to the body by a unani- 
mous vote, when the Moderator shall give to their dele- 
gates the right hand of fellowship. 

5. Every church in this Association is entitled to one 
representative, but no clTurch more than three. 

0. Every motion made and seconded shall be left to the 
discretion of the Association whetlier it may be debated 
or not. 

7. The Association shall endeavor to furnish tlie church- 
es with copies of its Minutes. 

8. The Minutes of the Association shall be read and ap- 
proved, and shall be signed by the Moderator and Clerk 
before the Association adjourns. 

i». Any church not representing itself in this body for 
three successive sessions, by letter or delegates, shall be 
stricken from the roll of the churches, unless satisfactory 
reasons are assigned. 

10. The Association shall withdraw fellowship from 
any church which shall be found disorderly in faith or 
practice. 

11. Visiting brethren from sister churches, or similar 
bodies, may be invited to participate in our deliberations. 

12. At each session of the Association delegates to the 
Baptist State Convention and to the Southern Baptist 
C^onvention shall be chosen by vote. 

13. This Constitution is subject to alteration by a ma- 
jority vote of the delegates enrolled at any session. 

14. The business of the Association shall be conducted 
according to Mell's Parliamentary Practice. 

ARTICI.i:S ( )F FAITH 

ADOPTED BY THE TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION, 

OCTOBER , 1833. 

We Believe: — 

1. That God made the world and all things therein, see- 
ing that He is Lord of heaven and earth; also, that there 
are three that bear record in heaven — the Father, the 
Word, and the Holy Ghost: and these three are one. — 
Acts xvii 24, I John v 7. 

2. That in the beginning was the Word, and the Word 
was with God, and the Word was God; also that the Word 
was made flesh and dwelt among us. — John i 1-14. 

3. That in the beginning God created the heavens and 
the earth; that He created man in His own image; that 
He saw everything that He had made, and behold it was 
very good. — Gen. i 1, 27. 31. 



2o MINUTES OF THE TAli RIVEK ASSOCIATION, 

4. That as sin entered into the world and death by sin. 
and so death passed upon aii men for that ail have sinned, 
even so all are by nature dead in trespasses and sins. — 
Rom. V 12, Eph.'ii 1. 

5. That all Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and 
is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for 
instruction in righteousness; that the will of God may be 
perfect, thoroughly furnisned unto all good works. — I 
Tim. iii 16, 17. 

6. That the Son of man is come to seek and to save that 
which vv^as lost; and that we joy in God through our Lord 
Jesus Christ by whom we have now received the atone- 
ment. — Luke xix 10, Rom. v 11. 

7. That God now commandeth all men everywhere to 
repent; and he that believeth and is baptized shall be 
saved, but he that believeth not shall be damned. — Acts 
xvii 30, Mark xvi 10. 

8. That there is one Lord, one faith and one baptism: 
and that therefore we are buried with Him by baptism 
into death, that like as Christ was raised from the dead 
by the glor}^ of the Father, even so we also should walk 
in newness of life. — Eph. iv 5, Rom. vi 4. 

9. That the Holy Spirit reproves the world of sin, and 
of righteousness, and of judgment; also that He hath 
quickened us together with Christ. — John xvi 8, Eph. ii 5. 

10. That by grace ye are saved through faith, and that 
not of yourselves, it is the gift of God; not of works lest 
any man should boast. — Eph. ii 8. 9. 

11 . That God hath blessed us with all spiritual blessings 
in heavenl}:' places in Christ, according as He hath chosen 
us in Him before the foundation of the world, that M^e 
should be holy and without blame before Him in love: 
that He hath chosen us from the beginning unto salva- 
tion, through sanctitication of the Spirit and belief of the 
truth.— Eph. i 3, 4, II Thess. ii 15. 

12. That we are justified by faith that w^orks by love.— 
Rom. V 1. 

13. That we are kept by the power of God, through 
faith, unto salvation ready to be revealed in the last time. 
— I Peter i 5. 

14. That there shall be a resurrection of the dead, both 
of the just and the unjust, w-ho shall come forth: they 
that have done good, unto the resurrection of life, and 
they that have done evil, unto the resurrection of damna- 
tion. — Acts xxiv 15. John v 25. 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

OF THE 

TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION, 



HELD WITH THE CHURCH IN WASHINGTON, 
BEAUFORT CO. OCT. 6TH, 7TH, 8TH, I902. 



HE NEXT SESSION TO BE HELD WITH THE CHURCH IN 

ROCKY MOUNT beginning on tuesuay night 

AFTER THE FIRST SUNDAY IN OCTOBER, J903. 



TO PREACH INTRODUCTORY SERMON, H. H. MASHBURN, 
ALTERNATE, J. J. DOUGLAS. 



OFFICERS. 

T. M. ARRINGTON, moderator ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 

A. G. WILCOX, CLERK AND TREASURER BRINKLEY VI LLE, N. C. 



THE COMMON WKAT.XH fRIJSTT 

SCOTI-AKD KECK, N. C. 

isoa. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

N. B1GG8. W. H. KIMBALL. E. W. SHEARIN. 

E. L. DAWSOX. T. B. WILDER. J. R. RODWELL. 

H. L. DRISCOLL. T. M. ARRINGTON. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Aged Ministers J. S. Barrow. 

Orphanage Noah Biggs. 

Home Missions B. Craig. 

State Missions M. L. Kesler. 

Education , H. H. Mashburn. 

Associational Misssions J. D. Hufham. 

Foreign Missions T. J. Tayloi-. 

Sunday Schools W. H. Kimball. 

Temperance B. K. Mason. 

Periodicals T . S . Crutchfield. 

Woman's Work Josiah Crudup. 



PASTORS AND POSTOFFICES. 

J. N. Booth. Greenville. M. L. Kesler, Scotland Neck. 

R. D. Carroll. Elm City. B. Leggett, Windsor. 

A. Cree, Embro. H. H. Mashburn, Louisburg. 

B. Craig, Rocky Mount. B. K. Mason, Williamston. 
G. W. Coppedge, Wakefield. G. W. May, Nashville. 
Josiah Crudup, Washington. J. D. Morgan. Weldon. 

T. S. Crutchfield. Tarboro. J. D. Morris, Franklinton. 
W. R. Cullum, Wake Forest. G. L. Merrill, Hobgood. 
J. R. Cullum, Wake Forest. W. C. Newell. Nashville. 
J. J. Douglas. Wilson. J. W, Rose, Bethel. 

G. M. Duke, Dukes. H. C. RufRn, Ronoake Rapids. 

J. T. Edmundson, Littleton. J. A. Stradley. Oxford. 

C. E. Edwards, Bethel. W. O. Rosser, Essex. 

J. D. Hufham, Henderson. T. J. Taylor, Warrenton. 
J. E, Hocutt, Spring Hope. C. C, Williams, Royal. 
G. W. Holmes, Epsom. A. G. Wilcox. Brinkley ville. 

R. P. W^alker, Henderson. 



^Proceedings. 

Washin(;T()N. N. C. October r.ili. 1902. 

The seventy-second session of the Tak Rivek Baptist 
Association was called to order by Bro. T. M. Arrington. 
the Moderator. Prayer by Bro. J, K. Howell. Lesson 
read by Bro. H. H. Mashburn. and Associational sermon 
preached by Bro. J. W. Rose, from Rev. 1: ]:]. after which 
Finance Committee was appointed, consisting of Ivev 
Allen. C. F. Ellen and R. E. Hancock. Roll of churches 
called and the following- delegates enrolled: 

Antioch — J. J. Draker. W. J. Collier. Ivey Hamill. 

Bear Swamp — By letter. 

Brown's — J Walter Smithwick. 

Bethel— C. E. Edwards. 

Bethlehem — By letter. 

Battleboro— By letter. 

Castalia — S. E. Lancaster. 

Cedar Rock — 

Corinth— T. G. Dean. Albert A. Dement. 

Conoho — W. A. Casper, Z. M. Whitehurst. 

Cedar Branch — J. C. Getsonger. J. Bailey. S. Harderson. 

Cypress Chapel — By letter. 

Cary Chapel — By letter. 

Conoconara — W. E. Barkley. J. H. Pope. J. R. Pope. 

Crocker's Chapel — E. H. Crocker. 

Dawson's — J. J. Partin. 

Elm City— R. D. Carroll, B. Chears. 

Everetts— 

Enfield— T. J. Dennis. 

Enterprise — By letter 

Eagles— By letter. 

Elm Grove — A. C. Williams, Willie Viverette. 

Ephesns— W. H. Abernathy G. W. Coppedge. 

Fishing: Creek— W. W. Rosser. John Avent. 



4 MINUTES OF THE 

Gardner's— By letter. 

Greenville — By letter. 

Gethsemane — E. J. Hundle. 

Halifax — 

Hamilton — By letter. 

Hickory— R. H. Stallings, W. S. Dozier, T. E. Powell. 

Hobgood — G. L. Merrell. 

Harriss Chapel — S. W. Hamlet. 

Henderson — 

John's Chapel — L. R,. Finch. 

Louisburg — T. B. Wilder, Ivey Allen, H. H. Mashburn. 

Littleton — Bv letter. 

Macon— T. M. Allan. 

Macedonia— By letter. 

Marmaduke— M. T. Duke, W. D. Gooch. 

Maple Spring — -J. H. AVheeless. 

Mt. Hebron— By letter. 

Mt. Zion— J. H. Harper. 

Middleburg— W. H. Kimball. 

Mildred— T. J. Crisp. 

Nashville — By letter. 

North Rocky Mount — F. C. Ferguson. 

New Hope— W. H. White. 

New Bethel — S. M. Hicks. 

Oak Level — By letter. 

Pactolus — 

Philadelphia— M. S. Griffin, J. S. Beal. 

Poplar Springs— J. C. White, C. J. Cheaves. 

Plymouth — Jas. W. Rose., E. Ludford. 

Peach Tree— G. Rice, G. W. Mitchell, J. C. Wheless. 

Pleasant Grove — J. W. Coslston, J. L. Hinton, J, R. 
Coggin. 

Quankie — 

Red Oak— J. C. Beal. 

Rock Spring— W. H. Fuller, B. F. Wilder. 

Roanoke Rapids — J. K. Dicken, H. L. DriscolL 

Reedy Creek— ^Ezra Davis. 

Rockv Mount— T. M. Arrington, E. W. Shearin, T. R. 
Bulluck. 

Red Bud— T. C. Collin, R. D. Lancaster. 

Stony Creek— C. F. Ellen. 

Sharon— J. H. Hicks. 

Samaria— J. E. Hocutt, S. J. Hagwood. 

Sandy Creek — J. J. Foster. 

Scotland Neck — R. E. Hancock, N, Biggs, R. M. Johnson, 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. O 

Sulphur Springs — By letter. 

Spring Hope — Willie B. Wheeless. 

Stanhope — S. R. Pearce. 

Social Plains—J. T. Alford, A. C. Bergeron. 

Tillery— By letter. 

Tarboro — C. J. Austin. 

Turkey Branch — By letter. 

Williamston — B. K. Mason. 

Warren Plains— W. E. Hawks. 

Washington— Thos. J. Latham, P. S. Parsons. 

Warrenton — J. R. Rodwell. 

Weldon — J. L. Harriss. B. A. Pope. 

Wilson— H. J. Hester. 

A majority of the churches being represented the As- 
sociation went into the election of its permanent officers. 
Bro. T. M. Arrington was re-elected Moderator and A. G. 
Willcox was re-elected Clerk and Treasurer. Bro. G. M, 
Duke was elected Assistant Historian. 

The following committees were appointed: On order of 
business. Brethren M. L. Kesler. J. Walter Smithwick and 
T. S. Crutchfield; on religious exercises. Bro. Josiali 
Crudup and the deacons of the church. 

Invitation to visiting brethren was extended, and ac- 
cepted by Bro. R.T. Vann. of the Baptist Female Univer- 
sity; Archibald Johnson, of Charity and Children; Bro. S. 
F. Conrad, of the Xorth Carolina Baptist and Bro. J. S. 
Corpening. of Welsh JSTeck Association of South Carolina. 
Bro. Crudup extended a very hearty welcome to the As- 
sociation on the part of the Baptists and citizens of Wash- 
ington which was responded to very happily by Bro. M. 
L. Kesler. 

Bro. Crudup read an invitation from the (31d Dominion 
Steamship Coinpany to take an excursion on the river 
Wednesday morning from 9 to 11a. m., which was unani- 
mously accepted. The Association adjourned to meet at 
'.) a. m. on Tuesdav. Oct. 7th. Benediction by- Bro. Geo. 
M. Duke. 



Tuesday, !>::30 o'clock, a. m. 

Association re-assembled and spent half hour in devo- 
tional exercises, led by Bro. Corpening. Committee on 
order of business offered a partial report as follows: 9:30 
Periodicals, 10:30 Orphanage, 11:30 Education. 12:30 ad- 
journ, 2:30 Sunday Schools. 3:30 Home Missions. 

Xew. churches making application for admission called 



r> .MINUTES OF THE 

for, and Eiddick's Grove from West Chowan applied by 
letter and v\-as heartily received. Rosemary, North Hen- 
derson, South Henderson and Robersonville vC W. Keel, 
delegate) presented letters with covenant, articles of faith, 
v/hich were referred to a committee consisting of Brethren 
Crutchfield, Pearce and Rose, who examined same and 
reported favorably and recommended that they be receiv- 
ed into fellowship of this body, which was done and the 
^loderator extended a welcome and the right hand of fel- 
lowship to the delegates. 

Report on Periodicals called for and in the absenc? of 
Bro. Hilliard who was to write the report Bro. Farmer 
was appointed and made short report and after addresses 
made by Brethren Farmer, Conrad and Johnson the fur- 
ther consideration was postponed until after Bro. Hilliard 
could make his report. Later Bro. Hilliard offered the 
following- report which was adopted: 

REPORT OX PERIODICALS. 

Intelligent thought is the only true basis of all 
successful work. The clearer the thought the sui'er the 
action. 

Our course and plan of action in anything depends 
largely upon how we think and what we tliink about. 

This principle holds good in the field of spiritual en- 
deavor as well as in the realm of secular energy. 

Our thinking and acting are largely influenced by the 
thinking and acting of others. It is very necessary, there- 
fore, that we put ourselves in touch with the best thought 
through the best mediums. Thus are we the better pre- 
pared for all our work, seculai' and spiritual. 

Safe and careful reading, then, may be set down as one 
of the surest means of keeping pace with whatever pro- 
gress appeals to us. And it is a matter of congratulation 
to the great Baptist host of our State and the country at 
large, that we have such a splendid system of Periodicals, 
thoroughly consecrated to the work of the denomination, 
and fully equipped for sending forth that intelligence to 
our people that enables them to do the Lord's work with 
great and telling effect. 

The Biblical Recorder has long been regarded by the 
Baptists of Xorth Carolina as their true exponent of re- 
ligious thought, and it is a pleasing observation thai its 
usefulness in its own peculiar field increases as it grows 
older. 

Charitv and Children is well worth a place in every 



TAR RIVF.R ASSOflATIO::, 7 

liorne. and our people cannot afford to be ion(n'ant of our 
•orphanage work, conceining vrhioli this paper keeps them 
thoroughly posted. 

The subject of Missions is stirring the religious world 
as perhaps never before, and the Foreign Mission Journal 
gives such information as intelligent Baptists can ill af- 
ford to miss. 

Our varied and excellent series of Sunday School litera- 
ture published by the Sunday School Board at Nashville. 
may be relied upon for ail our needs in this department of 
our work. 

The North Carolina Baptist is doing a great and good 
work in helping to keep tlie spirit of progress and en- 
thusiasm alive amongst our peox^de. and is one of the 
strongest forces for the cause of temperance ever felt in 
our State. 

In a word, all the periodicals by our denomination may 
be heartily recommended and safely depended upon, for 
they are under the watch care of good and true men. 
called of God for their specific work. 

E. E. MILLIARD. 

The hour for the report on the oi'phanage having ar- 
rived in the absence of Bro. T. J. Taylor who prepared 
the report, it was read by Bro. J. R. Rodwell, after which 
addresses were made by Brethren Rodvrell and Johnson. 
A collection was taken which amounted to SlOO.OO in cash, 
and the report was adopted. Bro. Johnson received after 
the adoption of repoit S22.50 which did not come into 
Treasurer's hands. 

REPORT ON THE ORPHANAGE. 

It is proper that we should ha,ve an annual report on 
The Orphanage; for it vv^as born in this Association. It 
originated in the loving, sympathetic heart of the late 
Dr. R. D. Fleming, and received its first financial support 
from Brethren John Watson and Noah Biggs. Therefore, 
it is very near our hearts, and deserves and should re- 
ceive our most liberal support. The following outline of 
the past and present condition of the Orphanage ought to 
make us profoundly thankful, and inspire us to make 
greater efforts for its support and enlargement: 

The first orphan was received in the Orphanage in 
November 1885, seventeen years ago. There have been 
received during that time seven hundred orphans: about 
five hundred have gone out and there are over two hun- 
dred present: and more than fifty applications on file. 



8 .MINUTES OF THE 

A goodly number of those who have gone out went at 
an ea,rly age into homes, some of whom have had the best 
advantages. Some of the girls have gotten positions as 
teachers in the public schools, quite a number have mar- 
ried, and some of them have comfortable and happy 
homes. A number of the boys are in good business posi- 
tions, several are good printers, and are doing well, at 
least two are doing well in the drug business, one in the 
lailroad shops, and others in various positions. 

The Orphanage has six dormitories and another about 
completed; and soon there will be room for between two 
hundred and fifty and three hundred. There are six 
teachers and six matrons, and the new building will add 
one of each. 

The Annual Report of the General Manager for 1002 says 
that "during the past six years we have added to our 
plant 825,000 in value." Since that time, indeed this 
year, there have been added in the J. A. Durham building 
and the farmer's cottage over Sij.OOO, and repairs alread}' 
started on the Mitchell House. Avhich will, with other im- 
provements carry the amount to over S-i,000, which makes 
the value of the entire plant easily 850.000. This estimate 
does not include the legacies of Brother Simmons and 
Judge Faircloth. 

There are on the grounds nineteen brick buildings and 
three v/ood buildings besides tlie ba:-n and stables. The 
farm contains about three hundred and fifty acres of land. 
The stock, six head of mules and a horse, about twenty- 
five head of cattle, little and large, and a few hogs. 

It is safe to calculate that there will be three hundred 
(U'phans during the present year. That will mean fifty 
per cent, more of current funds. Fifty beds hav^e already 
been ordered that will cost 8o.5() each, besides the cloth- 
ing, and furniture for teachers" and matrons' rooms, 
which will all told, foot up 8250. Our churches will need 
to add at least fifty per cent, to their former contributions 
to pull through the present year. Let it not be forgotten 
that we are not meeting the demands, we are nearly a 
year behind in taking in orphans: because we are not 
adding to our capacity near as fast as the needs require. 
Some of our people hear of the growth of our resources 
but fail to hear of the increased demands. The increase 
of our resources is grand and beautiful, but the increased 
demand is terrible and shameful. Is it right for us to put 
our General ^lanager and his associates in the humiliat- 
ing situation of being daily confronted with a horde of 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 9 

helpless orplians pleading for food and shelter and some 
little grain of parental care, and not provide them with 
means to meet the demands? Charity and Children which 
is ons of the most effective agencies for the furtherance 
of this great work should be in every Baptist family. 

We should not be satisfied to enjoy our own comfortable 
homes, and provide for the comfort and welfare of our 
children, and neglect the hundreds of helpless orphans 
who are pleading for shelter and food and care. We 
should remember that ''pure religion and undefiled before 
God and the Father is this, to visit the fatherless and the 
Avidows in their affliction, and to keep himself unspotted 
from the world." — jas.1:37. Respectfullv, 

T. J. TAYLOR. 

A welcome was extended to the new pastors who had 
come into the association since our last session: — Brethren 
H. H. Mashburn, Josiah Crudup, Walker, Edwards, R. D. 
Carroll and H. C. Ruffin. 

Report on Education was made by Bro. Crutchfield 
and discussed by Brethren Vann, Craig and Kesler and 
responses by other pastors pledging to use every effort in 
their power to raise money for the pledge made b}" the 
Association to pay off the debt on the Baptist Female Uni- 
versity. The report was adopted by a rising vote. 

REPORT ON EDUCATION. 

In the words of Dr. Vann, "'While it is not true that re- 
ligion is a product of education, it is true that education 
is a product of religion."' And we rejoice that we see so 
many evidences of the truthfulness of this statement 
among our Baptist people. Only a few years ago we were 
noted for our lack of education. Today we no longer bear 
this reputation; but instead, we are rapidly becoming an 
educated people, and we find Baptists in the forefront in 
the great educational movement that is sweeping over 
our country. It is our purpose to encourage and assist 
general education in every way possible. The fact that 
so many of our people have recently become engaged in 
manufacturing, presents a new and difficult phase of our 
educational outlook. It lays just and pressing claims to 
some of our best thought and attention. 

When practicable, we recommend the establishment of 
academic schools to be owned and controlled by Baptists. 
We also recognized the claims which our colleges have 
upon us. 



10 MINUTES OF THE 

Since there are more ministerial students applying' to 
the Board of Education for aid than can be helped with 
the available funds, we recommend increased contri- 
butions to this part of our work. 

We endorsed the pledg'e of five thousand dollars, made 
by our delegates to the 'last session of the Baptist State 
Convention, to the Century Fund, this being an effort on 
the part of the convention to raise fifty thousand dollars 
for our educational institutions. The larger part of this 
amount is to be used to pay xhe debt now standing against 
the Baptist Female University. 

T. S. CRUTCHFIELD. Com. 

Adjourned for dinner, prayer by Bro Carroll. 

Tuesday. 3 o'clock p. m. 

The Association met and was led in prayer by Bro. R. 
P. Walker. Report on Sunday Schools was made by Bro. 
J. R, Rodwell and addresses by Brethren Rodwell, Duke. 
Kimball and Keslei-. The report was adopted. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

The Sunday Schools is, or should be, the church at woi'k 
in one of its capacities. It is one of the ways to carry out 
the last great injunction given Christians by our Savior:- 
"Go ye into all the world and preach the Gospel to ever^ 
creature." 

He who has the opportunity to further the spread of the 
Gospel of Jesus Christ through the Sunday School, is dere- 
lict in his duty as a Christian, if he does not work for the 
Sunday School and in the Sunday School. 

Statistics, if available, would support the assertion that 
the largest per cent, of those coming into our churches 
come from our Sunday Schools. 

Let us work and pray for a Sunday School in every 
church, all the time, with every church member in the 
Sunday School at work, and when we get every chui'ch 
member actively at work in our Sunday Schools, then we 
will be much better prepared to hasten the coming of our 
Lord. 

The Sunday School Board of our State is located at 
Raleigh with Bro. T. Neil Johnson as Secretary. Every 
church in our Association should co-operate with this 
Board in the great work they are doing, and give all the 
encouragement possible. 

You]- committee recommends the use of the Sundav 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 11 

School periodicals of the Southern Baptist Convention, 
and after providing the school with Bibles be sure to give 
every family '"Kind Words" and "'Charity and Chiklren"" 
to read. 

J. R. ROD WELL. 

At this time the Moderator read a letter fi'om Bro. T. J. 
Taylor expressing his regret at not being able to be with 
ns on account of the extreme illness of his wife. The As- 
sociation was led in special prayer for Bro. Taylor and 
his good wife by Bro. Craig. 

Report was then submitted on Home Missions by Brt). 
J. K. Howell and discussed by Brethren Howell. Corpen- 
ing and Craig. The report was adopted. 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

The Home Mission Board at Atlanta has a claim upon 
the love. pra.yers. work and beneficence of every Baptist 
in the South. It is the intensive, strengthening work at 
liorne to do the extensive, lengthening work abroad. For 
the last ten years it has brought into the churches through 
its Missionaries more than one hundred thousand by bap- 
tism and letter and constituted between sixteen hundred 
and two thousand churches. Its contributions and work 
have steadily increased, yet the work to be done is greatei' 
than ever before. The Indians are among us. The 
colored people, 42 per cent, of our population, have a very 
great claim on us, and Cuba now has a greater claim than 
ever before. The increase of our army, navy, commerce, 
factories, milling and mining work, with our great in- 
crease in population and material wealth have brought 
upon us great religious duties. "And we know that all 
things work together for good to them that love God, to 
them who are the called according to his purpose."" 

But I think the contrary is true for their evil, if they 
are not called and do not love Him. May the God of na- 
tions increase our love for Him that we may seek first His 
Kingdom and righteousness. 

We recommend contributions from all our churches to 
this Board. 

J. K. HOWELL. 

Bi'o. Kesler for the committee on order of business sub- 
mitted final report as follows: 

Foreign Missions Wednesday at 11 a. m.; Miscellaneous 
business, 2:oO p. m.; Obituaries, 2:45 p. m. ; Temperance, 



12 



MINUTES OF THE 



3:00 p. m.; Aged Ministers, 3::30 p. m.; State Missions, 
7:30 p. m. 

On motion of Bro. Cruel up it was ordered that a com- 
mittee on "Woman's Work"" be added to the Standing 
Committees of the Association, carried. Bro, N. Biggs, 
Treasurer of Executive Committee and Bro. A. G. Wilcox, 
Treasurer of the Association offered their reports which 
were referred to Bro. T. B. Wihler as Auditor, who after- 
wards reported examined and appi-oved in both reports. 

REPORT OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 
Tar River Baptist Association, 

To N. Biggs. Treasurer. 



7501. 
(Jet. ! 



Tct casli paid R 



V. C. 
R. 
'1' 
A. 
W 

(;. 
\v 

I. 
J- 

A. 

\V 



W. (.'oppedge $6000 

1). Carroll 200 00 

, J. Crisp 50 00 

, G. Wilcox 7"; 00 

. N, Whiteside 41 50 

G. O'Neil 41 65 

. J . Crowson 1000 

E. Hutsoii 30 00 

T. Edimnidson do 00 

L ree ^5 00 

'. O. RossPr 5 00 

E, Ewdards 25 00 

siah Crudti)^ 200 00 

3. Fanner T25 00 

[C.Mason 17500 

I-. Merrill 12s 00 

W.Rose 66 66 

T. Lumpkin 165 00 

("raic; 100 00 

, S. Crutchlield 12s 00 



#1,684 .Sj 



100 1. 

(ict. I. Tiy rimouiit due .-\ssociotion tiiis day $ 1939 

" 10. " " from ■■ 159881 

" ift. '■ Henderson clnirch loS 45 

• Quankie '■ 1000 

" Eelhlehem " 5 00 

P.attleboro " 2350 

A. G. Wilco.x 9 50 

!. E. Hocutt I 50 



To balame down . 



?i.6S4 Si 
9i 34 



81.776 15 



$1.776 15 j:i,776 15 



3902. 

0<:l I. r.v balance due .Assntiation this day , 



$9^ 34 

Exaniiiicd and approved Oct. 7th 1902. 
T. B. WILDER, Auditor. 

Tar River Baptist Association 

In Acc't With A. G. Wilcox, Treas. 

O.t. i9or. RECEIPTS. 

To balance due .Association at last session $ 5 37 

Received l-'i nance Committee for Foreign Missions 36 32 

" Home .Missions 1267 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 13 

" " •■ '■ State Missions 33 19 

•' " ■' ■• Education 8000 

:* " '■ "• Orphanage 22 71 

• ■' '■ " Ministers Relief Board 1747 

" Minutes 7436 

Cash collection for Orphanage 46 20 

" State Missions 200 

" " ■■ Associational Missions 950 

yuankie ch. '" " " 1000 

Bethlehem ch. " " " ,. 500 

Henderson ch. " Minutes 2 00 

New Bethel ch. " Foreign "" 67 50 

Total. $42429 

CONTR.A. 

By aniouijt paid Walters Durham for Foreign Missions $36 32 

'■ Home ••• 1267 

•■ State " 3319 

•' " •• '■ " P3ducation 8000 

•' Orphanage 22 71 

" .Ministers Relief Board 17 47 

'■ " ■ Cash collection for Orphanage 46 20 

" Cash collection for State Missions 2 00 

Xoali Biggs from (Juankie for Associational Missions 10 00 

" '■ "' " ■■ Bethlehem " " 500 

■' " ■• " '■ Cash collection " " 950 

E. E. Milliard for printing minutes 50 00 

Walters Durham from New Bethel for Foreign Missions 67 50 

'• ■' Clerk fee 2500 

Stationery, mailing manuscript, etc 50 

Mailing blank church letters I 00 



$424 29 
Respectfully submitted. 
A. G. WILCOX, Treas. 
E.xamined and approved Oct. 7th 1902 
THOS. B. WILDER, Auditor. 

The committee on time, place and preacher for the next 
Association was appointed, consisting of Brethren M. L. 
Kesler, E. L. Dawson and C. J. Austin. 

The Executive Committee was appointed as follows: 
N. Biggs Chairman, W. H. Kimball, E. W. Shearin, E. L. 
Dawson, T. B. Wilder, J. R. Rodwell, H. L. Driscol and 
T. M. Arrington. Adjourned, prayer by Bro. Hocutt. 

Tuesday Night. 
Met at 7:30 p. m. and led in prayer by Bro. Ivlay. Com- 
mittee on Digest of Church Letters was appointed consist- 
ing of Brethren Craig, Dawson and Harris. 

Bro. Biggs made a statement in reference to the debt on 

the church at Roanoke Rapids; that if the Association 

would raise $20iJ.OO the church would pay the balance 

amounting to about .$475.00, which amount was raised as 

follows: 

Scotland Neck ch. ;]o 00 W. E. Barkley 5 00 

Rocky Mount 25 00 F. C. Ferguson pd. 5 00 

N, Biggs 20 00 J. T. Han-is 5 00 



14 



MINLTTES OF THE 



H, L. Driscol 
Pw T. Yann 
J. H. Pope 
Weldon cli, 
G. M. Duke 
J. M. A vent 
Tarboro ch. 
Washinectoii 



pel. 



10 00 


J. W. Rose 


5 00 


10 00 


Brown's pcL 


. 5 OO 


10 00 


G. L. Merrill 


5 00 


10 00 


E. Ludford 


5 00 


10 00 


Orphanag'e cb. 


5 OO 


5 00 


P. E. Hancock 


5 00 


10 00 


C. F. Ellen pd. 


2 00 


10 00 


W. S. Dozier pd. 


1 00 

S203 00 



The hour for the special order having- arrived, the re- 
port on Associational Missions was offered by Bro Craig, 
and thrilling, soul-stirring addresses were delivered by 
Brethren Graig, Kesler and Duke. 

REPORT ON ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONS. 
Twenty-four years ago this Association undertook the 
work of supplying the Gospel to the destitute places with- 
in our own borders. Then we were a feeble people; hav- 
ing only twenty-nine churches. Under the guidance of 
God we have steadily grown until we now number eighty- 
five churches with a membership of more than nine 
thousand. It is a beautiful story of self sacrifice and he- 
roic struggles, how our fathers struggled for the master. 
They, like the Apostles, preached in tents made from na- 
ture's store-house, the forest, and in barns, school-houses 
and homes. In many places where we preached under 
bush-arbors, we have neat houses of worship and beside 
the little school house we have erected a house of prayer. 
God has wonderfully blessed us, we have grown to be the 
for(!most bod}' of the kind in the State. The year just closed 
has been perhaps our best 3-ear. We have at this session 
received into our fellowship five new churches, and we 
are building others. So far as your committee can ascer- 
tain nearly all of the pledges for Associational Missions 
have been paid. One hundred and eighty-three bap- 
tisms have been reported in the churches supported by 
your Board, with bright prospects in many places. But 
still there is great destitution within our own borders. As 
we look back upon the past and see how much God has 
blessed us, let us go foward and rest not until these worst 
places shall be built up, and all our section shall have the 
glorious Gospel of Chi'ist. 

BRAXTON CRAIG. Com. 



TAK KITKK ASSOCIATION. 



15 



Roll of the chui-ches was called and the 


following 


edges were made 


by churc 


dies and individuals: 




Scotland Neck 


$225 (JO 


Red Oak 


$25 00 


Louisburg 


125 0(1 


Roanoke Rapids 


25 00 


Henderson 


100 CHI 


Stony Creek 


25 00 


Rocky Mount 


G(J ()(t 


Sharon 


25 (HI 


Wilson 


o(.i (M> 


Tarboi-o 


:]() 00 


Warrenton 


50 oo 


Conoconara 


20 00 


Washington 


50 0(1 


Elm City 


20 00 


Poplar Springs 


50 (HI 


Gethsemane 


2(» 00 


Williamston 


:j5 (Hi 


Hamilton 


20 00 


Maple Springs 


no 00 


Hickory 


20 00 


Philadelphia 


yo 00 


Plymouth 


20 00 


Brow^n's 


25 00 


Warren Plains 


20 00 


Corinth 


25 00 


F. C. Ferguson 


20 0(» 


Dawson 


25 (»0 


Fishing Creek 


17 5(S 


Enfield 


25 (HI 


Enterprise 


15 0(t 


Gardners 


25 0(1 


Ephesus 


15 00 


Greenville 


25 0(1 


Hobgood 


15 00 


Littleton 


"25 (»0 


Harris Chapel 


15 00 


jST. Rocky Mount 


25 0(1 


Mt. Zion 


15 00 


New Bethel 


25 (10 


Vaughans 


10 00 


Middleburg 


15 00 


Mrs, F C. Ferguson 10 (Hi 


Pleasant Grove 


15 (HI 


Oak Level 


8 00 


Rock Springs 


15 00 


Halifax 


r. 00 


Reedy Creek 


15 (HI 


Bethlehem 


5 00 


Red Bud 


15 (HI 


C'edar Branch 


5 (_)0 


Sandy Creek 


15 00 


Crocker's Chapel 


5 00 


Tillerv 


15 00 


Elm Grove 


5 00 


Bethel 


12 50 


John's Chapel 


5 00 


Castalia 


12 50 


Marmaduke 


5 00 


Samaria 


12 50 


Macedonia 


5 00 


Cedar Rock 


12 00 


Mt. Hebron 


5 00 


Antioch 


10 00 


Sulphur Springs 


5 00 


Battleboro 


10 00 


Social Plains 


5 00 


Cypress Chapel 


10 (HI 


Turkej-^ Branch 


5 00 


Everetts 


10 00 


Robersonville 


5 00 


Eagles 


10 00 


Riddick's Grove 


5 00 


Macon 


12 (HI 


North Henderson 


5 (.10 


Mildred 


10 00 


South Henderson 


5 00 


Nashville 


1(1 (HI 


Rosemary 


5 0() 


New Hope 


10 (10 


P. S. Parsons 


5 00 


Pactolus 


LO (HI 


G. W. Mav 


5 00 


Peach Tree 


1(1 (HI 


W. H. White 


5 0(» 


Quankie 


1(1 00 


A. A. Dement 


5 00 



Spring' Hope 


10 00 


Stanhope 


10 00 


Noah Biggs' 


10 00 


E. L. Dawson 


10 00 


G. M. Duke 


10 00 


T. J. Crisp 


2 00 



1^' MINUTES OF THE 

A. G. Wilcox 00 

L. A. Llo^-d pd. 2 50 
J. E. Hocutt 2 50 

C. T. Cheaves 2 50 

W. E. Barkley 2 50 

W. S, Dozier pd, 2 OO 
J, a. Coggin 2 00 

W. H. Abernathy 2 00 
R. H, Stalling® pd. 1 00 
Total ■ $1, '901 00^" 

After a few remarks by Bro. Rose on his w^ork at Rober- 
sonville the report was adopted. Adjourned. 

Wednesday 11 o'clock. 
The Association upon re-assembling was led in prayer 
by Bro. McLeod. Bro. Lawson, pastor of the Presbyterian 
church of Washington, was welcomed to a seat among us 
and was happy in his remarks. 

Report on Foreign Missions was called for and was read 
by Bro. Mashburn wTio f oUowxed the report with an earnest, 
forceful address. Bro. Duke was called on to pray that 
God would honor us by calling a man or woman from our 
Association to go to the foreign field, and after an address 
by Bro. Lawson the report was adopted. 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 
It is safe to affirm that the making of disciples of all 
nations is the supreme business of those who love our 
Lord Jesus Christ, The g'reat commission means that, 
and nothing less. 

Our churches do not come up to the measure of duty 
which our Lord set for them, if they do not earnestly and 
faithfully seek to give the Gospel to the great heathcni 
world. 

•'Our missionaries in general are reporting blessed pro- 
gress on the mission field; especially is this true in China 
and Brazil." 

But interest in Foreign Missions is not lo be governed 
by the progress reported from the fields, but by loving- 
obedience to the will of Him "who loved us, and gave 
himself for us,'" and, "who is the propitiation for our 
sins, and not for ours only, but also for the sins of the 
whole world." 

It is also suggested that pastors encourage the Woman's 
Work by aiding them in organizing Missionary Societies 
and in bringing to a higher state of efficiency those al- 
ready in existence. H, H. MASHBURN. 



TAR RiVER ASSOCIATION. 17 

Adjourned. Prayer by Bro. Duke. 

Wednesday 2:30 p. m. 

Association met and led in prayer b^ Bro. Crutclifield. 
Bro. T. M. Arrington was appointed delegate to Southern 
Baptist Convention, B. Craig alternate. 

Delegates to Baptist State Convention appointed as 
follows:— M. L. Kesler, A. G. Wilcox, N. Biggs. 

The following resolution by Bro. Biggs was carried:— Re- 
solved, that in the future no Standing Committee on Obit- 
uaries be appointed and that at each session of the Asso- 
ciation a special hour be set apart for memorial services. 

Committee on time, place and preacher report as fol- 
lows: — Time. Tuesday night after 1st Sunday" in October; 
place, Rocky Mount and H. H. Mashburn to preach intro- 
ductory sermon, J. J. Douglas, alternate. 

Standing Committees were appointed. (See page 2.) 

Bro. Craig, Committtee on Digest of Church Letters, 
made the report, which was adopted. 

Bro. Merrill read the report on Obituaries. wJiich, with- 
out discussion was adopted. 

REPORT ON OBITUARIES. 

•■Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of his 
saints." 

Williamston church lost, in the death of Bro. Dennis 
Simmons, one of her best, most active and true members. 

Bro. Simmons departed this life at a ripe old age, and 
the Tar River Association loses one of its most liberal 
givers. In his last bequest he gave largely to the Baptist 
Orphanage, and to the Baptist Female University. 

His gifts in life and at death approximate, we think, 
one hundred thousand dollars. 

We commend the life of Bro. Simmons as a worthy ex- 
ample of consecration and liberadity. 

Conoho church lost, in the death of Miss Susie W^hite- 
hurst, a cultured, consecrated, bright christian. We had 
hoped that God had a great work for lier to do among her 
young friends, who were many; but her life is yet a sacred 
memory, and her works shall follow her. 

Brown's church has lost by death. Sister Leathea Haw- 
kins, an aged colored woman who had for many years 
been one of the most faithful and devout members of the 
church. 



18 MINUTES OF THE 

Macon clmrch mourns the death of Bro. Gideon R. Rig- 
gan. As a soldier, as a citizen, as a neighbor, in his 
family., and as a christian, he was a good man and true. He 
finished his course with joy, and at a ripe old age entered 
into ''the rest that remaineth to the people of God." 

Warren Plains church reports the death of Bro. AUie D. 
Hawks. He lived a sincere christian, and died trium- 
phantly. 

Warrenton church has been greatly bereaved this year 
in the death of five devout women; Sisters Mary E. Har- 
per, Bettie Davis, S. T. Miles, Ella R. Davis and Nannie 
E. Johnson. These all fought a good fight, finished their 
course, kept the faith, and are now, doubtless, in that city 
Avliere the pure in heart see God. — Martha T. Wilcox. 

Greenville church. — Sister W. H. Ragsdale, a good 
woman, died on June 1st. 

There have been the follov\dng deaths from other 
churches, and some have died w^hose names are not here 
recorded, but thev are recorded in the Lamb's Book of 
Life:— 

Louisburg church: — Dr. J. S. Meadows, Mrs. R. D. Pin- 
nell and Mrs. Gaston Hj'cock. Spring church: — Roily 
Adams and Wiley Lamb. Gethsemane: — Mrs. Philander 
Pittman, a charter member. Tarboro: — Mrs. Thos. 
Elliott and Miss Lena Bryan. 

Respectfullv submitted. 
G. L. MERRILL, Com. 

Report on Temperance was offered by Bro. Carroll and 
after an address by Bro. Carroll it was adopted. 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 

The promotion of temperance among the people, means 
the building up of the industrial, social, civil and educa- 
tional elements of our State as well as the religious. 

There is nothing more destructive to these important fac- 
tors of our State than the liquor trafiic. Intemperance 
fosters the spirit of anarchy and lawlessness. There is 
nothing that w^ll disorganize and blight a church more 
than for it to have members who indulge in moderate and 
social drinking. 

Cider- and wine-making among some members has 
been detrimental to the spiritual growth of our churches 
in some localities. 

I am glad to say the temperance cause is growing in our 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 19 

State. Half of the counties are prohibition entirely, and 
one-half of the remainder have prohibition except at the 
county seats. 

The Anti-Saloon League is a non-partisan, inter-denom- 
inational temperance organiza^tion that is doing much 
just now to advance the cause of temperance; and is 
worthy of your hearty support. 

Respectfully submitted, 
JAS. W. ROSE, Com. 

Report on Aged Ministers was read by Bro. M. L. Kesler, 
and after some touching addresses by Brethren Kesler 
and Tucker and a fervent prayer by Bro. G. M. Duke for 
these aged servants of God and a cash collection of sis.On 
the report was adopted. 

AGED MINISTERS. 

The Board makes a very modest but earnest appeal to 
the churches for contributions to be used in caring for 
these aged and infirm ministers, or their helpless widows. 

None are aided but those who have given tlieir lives to 
the preaching of the Gos^Jt-l, thus surrendering the privi- 
lege of pursuing any business avocation that might pro- 
vide for them when the infirmities of age or disease come 
upon them. When this occurs they must be cared for by 
free will offerings from God's people or sent to the County 
Home. The object of this Board is to look after the de- 
serving ones in a decent and definite way. They are 
helped in their own homes. "The laborer is worthy of 
his hire,'' and they that preach the Gospel shall live of 
the Gospel down to the end of life. This Board is located 
in Durham. Good business men look after its interests. 
Rev. J. F. McDuffie is Cor. Secretary, but no one travels 
for it especially. Seventy-five per cent, of the contribu- 
tions is invested, forming a sinking fund, the interest 
only of which is us 3d. 

We recommend that all the churches take one collection 
during the year for this object, and suggest that it be 
taken on the Sunday nearest to Christmas as a Christmas 
present to the old preachers. 

M. L. KESLER. 

The clerk was ordered to have usual number of minutes 
printed and receive usual compensation. 

Bro. Kesler offered the following resolution which was 
adopted: — Whereas, the Tar River Association has six 
ministerial students at Wake Forest, aided by the Board 



20 5Il'XrTES OF THE 

of Education: Be it resolved that each pastor take col- 
lectiou for this subject during the month of January. 
Adjourned. Prayer by Bro. Ruffin, 

Wednesday Night 7 ;:](>. 

The Association was led in prayer by Bro. Howell. 

The special order being State Missions the rej>ort was 
offered by Bro. Craig w^ho followed it in one of his charac- 
teristic, earnest, soul-stirring appeals and concluded his 
eloquent address by raising ^50.40 in cash for a church in 
Aurora. Other addresses on the report were made by 
Brethren Milliard , McLeod and Walker. 

A resolution passed that a collection be taken in all the 
(diurches hy December Ist for said object. The report 
was adopted. 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 

State Missions in North Carolina is divided into three 
parts. 

1. Missions in Western Carolina. 

2. Missions in Central Carolina, .or Factory Missions, 
■]. Missions in Eastern Carolina. 

I. 
in the West the people do not need to be evangelized so 
much as they need to be developed. Their need of schools 
and training is very great, and if these people could once 
be reached and brought in touch with our work, they 
would be a great power for good. We are doing some- 
thing for tliem, but do not begin to meet the demands, 
which God has laid upon us. 

IT 
The question of Factoi'V Missions is one of the great 
questions for the Baptists, It is a problem to be solved by 
us. Foi* the most part the factory people are people from. 
the counties adjoini:xg the factory. They are not used to 
town life, and do not readily adapt themselves to town 
w^ays* Then they are a migratory people. We need not 
hope to build up strong churches rapidly in factory towns, 
The people move too much. But thej^ deserve the Gospel, 
and in these towns we need our strongest and wisest men. 
W^e are not putting half enough money on "Factory 
fields'' to meet the demands. The w^ork is very impor- 
tant. 



TAR RIVER ASSOCI-i^TION. 21 

III. 

Eastern Carolina is uiir real mission field. In the terri- 
tory occupied by the Neiise. Tar River, Eastern and 
Chowan Associations there are counties where the }3eople 
have not the opportunity to hear the Gospel as vv^e believe 
it. In Hyde County we have two Baptist churches organ- 
ized, but only one house. In Wilson County we have 
three organizations and four houses. In Edgecombe we 
have four churches but all of them are feeble. In Martin, 
Beaufort, Dare and Pitt, the destitution is very great. We 
need men, men called of God to preach to these fields, 
which are "white uuto the harvest." We need houses 
for these men to preach in, but men and houses call for 
money, and with all this great destitution, the contribu- 
tions through the State is less for State Missions than it 
was last year at this time. Your committee appeal to the 
brethren of the Tar River Association to arise and do 
their full duty. We have led in the Orphanage work, 
we are leaders in Associational Missions, and now let us 
lift the banner and lead our brethren in the great work of 
State Missions. Resolved, that every pastor in the bounds 
of the Tar River Association take one collection for State 
Mission before the oOth day of November 1902, and that 
each pastor pledge this body that they will try to increase 
their collection 25 per cent, over last vear. 

BRAXTON CRAIG, Com. 

Bro. Hilliard ofiered the following resolution of thanks 
which w^as adopted by a rising vote: 

Resolved, That the thanks of this body are hereby 
tendered the Baptist church of AVashington, for theii- 
warm and hospitable entertainment; and also to the mem- 
bers of other denominations and the citizens of the town 
generally for their hearty sympathy and good offices in 
entertaining delegates and visitors. 

2nd. That thanks also be tendered the Old Dominion 
S. S. Co.. for a delightful excursion given the body and to 
the agents, Messrs. Myers and Capt. LeMoine, Capt. D^.xon 
and other officers of the steamer Albemarle, for their 
kindness and courteous attention on the excursion. 

;5rd. That thanks also be tendered the Coast Line and 
other railroad companies for their consideration in re- 
duced rates and to the press of the city for their full and 
interesting reports w^hich liave been given of these meet- 
ings. E. E. HILLIARD. 

Finance Committee report as follows, and adopted. 

Your Finance Committee report that we have received 



22 MINUTES OF THE 

for 

Foreign Missions $ 40 80 

Home Missions 28 00 

State Missions 29 (iO 

Associational Missions 1,649 15 

Education 35 98 

Orphanage 42 44 

Aged Ministers 15 29 

Sunday Schools 7 00 

Church in Martin County 10 00 

Minute fund " 80 76 

Total 7.$T^j39~Tr~ 

After this report had been made a letter was received 
from Greenville church bringing $25.00 for Associational 
Missions. " IVEY ALLEN, Com. 

"Blest be the tie that binds." was sung, and after one 
of the most harmonious sessions the Moderator declared 
the Association adjourned to meet at Rocky Mount Tues- 
dav night after the first Sunday in October. 1903. 

T. M. ARRINGTON, Mod. 
A. G. WILCOX, Clerk. 
MINUTES OF WOMAN'S MEETII^G. 
The AV^oman's Missionar}" Societies of the Tar River 
Associpction met in Washington. Oct. 7th 1902 in the 
Disciples church at 3:30 p. m. By direction of the State 
President, Miss Fannie E. S. Heck, Mrs. Josiah Crudup 
called the meeting to order and acted as Associational 
vice-president. Meeting opened by singing hymn, '•'From 
Greenland s Icy Mountains." Scripture, Isaiah 35, was 
read by Mrs. Crudup Prayer by Dr. R. T. A^ann. Meet- 
ing was called to order, and Mrs. Parsons, of Washington, 
acting as Secretary called the roll of the societies. The 
folio Vising societies reported, to- wit: 

Rocky Mount, Henderson. Scotland Neck, AVeldon. 
Sandy Creek, Warren Plains, Battleboro, Wilson, Mt. 
Zion, Spring Hope, Hobgood, Hickory, Poplar Springs. 
Washington. 

A letter from Miss Heck to the Woman's Missionary 
Society of the Tar River Association was read by Mrs, 
Austin of T arbor o. 

A paper by Miss Heck was read by Miss Smith, of 
Washington. Dr. R. T. Vann, of Raleigh then addressed 
the meeting, his subject being "Woman's Work." 

On Motion the meeting adjourned. Hymn, "Work for 
the Night is Coming." Prayer by Mrs. Latham, of Wash- 
ino'ton . 



TAR RIVRR ASSOCIATION. 



28 









—5 


<5.)^ t: ;t: 2 a: 


* o 


:- 

XT 





2 

'c 

'B 




, 


J) ■'' "= 




2_ 




3 c 


re := - 




3.re 
■3^ 


in 

m 










CX4^ O) VI to --J 


5 


Foreign 

Missioiis. 




DO M *^ 
S3 COJi- 


op 


oi 'ji to a\.;i- o 


Home 

Missions. 


V 




O ^ 




'j! ^ !0 N) Oi CCM 

O ^ O VI O " t- 
O Oi o o o o o 


State j 
^'^ssions. I 

1 
1 

1 






i- 






















1 

1 

Associational t 
Missions. 








8 
















§ 




i 
Orphanage. 


, 






O 














Ol 


on 
Ln 




Other 

Objects. 




TvJ 'n On ►" b -' Oj to tJ 1-1 W 
t>j K) Oo vO >H ►- ON OCCn ^ \0 i-M On 0> 

--» qoo". 'o (>J ONV' to •>! o -f^ c>,-|i- <r 

O* --J OT' O O Ch C Vi C o O -t^ '^I o 


Total, 




U) O'JOiOn 










c.;^^ 


VO 


Members.. 






- 


■ cc 


- 














O 




» 


Average 
Attendance. 

1 



P H 



c p: 



o 



C 
c 

c 



tfc 

l-H 

Q 



c ^ 



o ^ 






'- (X 
I-" iX 

'^ I— < 

■- i 

CO 

c 

Q 

I— I 



•>4' 



MINUTES OF THE 



DIGEST (3F CHURCH LETTERS. 

COMPARING THE WORK OF WOl WITH THAT OF r.)02. 



CHrRCHES 



1 igoi I 1902 



1902 



Aiitioch 

Bear Swamp 

Baltleboro 

Browns 

Bethlehem 

Bethel 

Cedar Rock 

Cedar Branch 

Castalia 

Concho 

Corinth 

Crockers Chapel 

Cypress Chapel 

i.'onoconara 

Cary's Chapel 

Uawson 

Elm Citv 

Enfield 

Enterprise 

Elm Grove.- 

Epesus 

Eagles 

Everetls 

Eishing Creek •. . . . 

("rreenville 

Gardner's 

(iethsemaue 

Halifax 

Hickory 

Hobgood 

Harriss' Chapel 

Hamilton 

Henderson 

lohn's Chapel 

Littleton 

Loiiisburg 

Macon 

Macedonia 

Marmaduke 

Maple Springs 

Mt. Hebro.i 

Mt. Zion 

Middleburg 

Mirdred 

Xorlh Rocky >to\uil. 

Xew Bethel 

Xew^ Hope 

Nashville 

North Henderson 

Oak Level 

Pactolus 

Peach Tree 

Hlymoiuh 

Philadelphia 

Poplar Springs 

Pleasant Grove 

(Juankie 

Rock Springs 

Robersonville 

Rosemarv 

Red Oak 

Rocky Mount 

Roanoke Rapids 



^6 
j6- 



136 



iSS 
134 



56 
162 

67 
140 
^6 



130 
90 



S& 
5S 
42 

124 

S=; 

65 
loi 
117 

1 28 

29 



S 74 25 S' 121 98 3 4; 73 
134 02 7 



60 I 

154 1 



51 


9 




129 


5 




95 


II 




C'S 




2 


103 
III 


2 


'"6" 


114 


■••••• 


14 


25 




4 


20 


26 




S-^ 




2 














5'' 


5 





176 54 
156 00 
245 541 
126 59| 
40 00 
405 00] 

S7 00! 
120 III 
146 S6 
146 17 
264 65 
270 85 
123 77| 
42 25| 
45 44' 
239 92 



117 

2S6 

5 

166 



117 65 

2S6 31 

5 00 



62 
120 



31 oe 
26 Q2 



Ii4 
197 
365 
436 
9 



51 75 


!5)0 Si 


165 83 



77 04 

117S 73 

251 60 

?5 3s 



190 

92 
9S 

1414 
^^2 



15- 



9 75 

2S 06 



55 621 
So 76 
72 14 



9S 



109 17; 143 19 

220 34 j 207 <jS 

545 S5! 296 10 

244 69 270 50 



45 
195 
!55 



114 
235 



26 

1S6 



3S5 
'73 



54 
110 
199 
52 
39 
45 
191 
150 
147 



151 
149 
49 



I.-M 

6S 
242 
404 
16S 



17 




86 




' 


10 


■ 34 




9 






5 







54 55 


93 21 


406 00 


37^ " 


3915 50 


4902 7<J 


106 97 


113 04 


296 S6 


57 24 


123 00 


07 00 


201 45 


297 38 


87 50 


66 75 


154 95 


139 56 


297 66 


306 99 


202 50 


54 S3 


42S 79 


737 18 


34S 40 


305 92 


loS 12 


58 50 


140 75 


76 25 



34 06 

'25 'si' 
38 66 



967 20 
6 07 



1.^3 04- 
6 34 



32 3S 

IM 77 
49 67' 



13 26. 
249 75. 



152 25 
69 65 

130 <tO 





95 


93 


; 109 33 
"30S'39 




" 


07 



27 89- 



239 62 

56 00- 



20 75 
15 39' 



42 48 
49 62 

2S SO 



157 37 
410 00 
126 00 



135 
634 
193 
759 
119 



9 15 
4 95 

634 48 
36 56 

349 95 



110 

165 



9 
46 
no 
209 

li2 



651 99 

1S7 86 
1575 42 



344 40 ' I 

413 90:1 

. 651 99' 

203 80, 1 

2063 66! 



1 88 79 
413 90 



440 69 1070 43' 



15 97 
488 24 
629 74 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATIOX. 

DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS-CoxcxroED. 



25 




667 61 
2S74 II 

t" churches report an increase of v7 Qr^ -:. 
32 churches report a decrease 0I SMM.-jt 



■l.-i62.19. 



flaking net gain of 
8 churches make no rewm-t V^i,., ^^ 
say that^they believe ;^'yav^ ^LST"'" '"^^ ^^^^^^'■ 



year, and that .ve believe that 
-^Hssions than nt a...- ^;^.. _•_'*'- 



ons than at any time in 



^'^e hav 



500 members this 



. ^'e given more ro 
our history. 

Signed. 

B. CRAIG. 

E. L. DAAVSOX 

J- L. HARRIS S 



2(> 



MINUTES OF THE 



PLEDGES. 



CHURCHES, 



m 










n 






^O 


o 


5 


c 
o 


1) 


V 


S 




















.1^ 

u 
O 


o 


in 


C3 


Oipha 


< 


S 





Aritifich 


$ 6 44 


$ 


$ 


§ 2 II 


$ 1 00 


$ 2 00 


$ I 00 


45 
60 

1 50 
10 






60 




25 00 
12 50 
















Bethel 






















10 00 
14 20 
10 00 

ID 00 
25 00 

5 00 


I 25 


t 50 


3 00 




5 20 




I 00 
I 25 
I 50 

1 00 

2 00 
50 

I 00 
65 
75 

1 00 
I 50 




Castalia 


15 45 

13 50 

12 00 


Cedar Rock 






2 00 








C vpress Chapel 











I 00 


Corinth 














Conoho 


25 




I 00 








6 75 








1 53 
50 




Cary's Chapel 


10 25 
13 00 

5 00 
25 00 
15 00 
10 00 
10 00 

8 00 
10 00 

5 00 
20 00 
15 00 
25 00 








7.5 
I 64 


2 00 


11 65 








3 33 


24 25 
5 50 
27 00 


Crockers Chapel 






Dawson 


X 00 










Klin City 


























Enfield 










10 S4 




I 00 




Enterprise 

E a <<1 es 
























25 
I 00 
I 15 

60 
1 25 




Elm Grove 



















2 50 


1 75 

2 50 






3 15 


I S5 


27 95 
20 60 


Fishing Creek . 












26 25 


















South Henderson 


I 00 

1 00 

15 00 














25 


1 25 




1 30 


3 00 


2 25 




















iS 00 


Halifax 














Hamilton 


15 00 

15 00 

16 61 
15 00 
















1 00 
I 00 
I 05 

I OOj 


16 00 




















14 00 


6 50 


.... 
9 00 


S 00 






55 16 

16 CO 
























John's Chapel 


3 00 

125 00 

25 00 

16 00 

5 25 

5 00 
34 00 

5 00 
12 50 
15 00 
10 00 
10 00 
25 00 

5 ^° 
25 25 

8 00 

S 00 
30 00 
50 00 
10 00 
15 00 
15 00 














2 00 
130 

1 25 
75J 
50 

2 00 
75 

1 00 
I 00 


3 70 
127 00 
26 30 














Littleton 






















4 29 
4 30 





" " 66 


21 54 








2 00 


S 00 


Mt. Hebron 









59 00 
6 75 


I 00 

1 00 

2 50 



1 00 




2 50 


... 

I 00 


I 00 


Mt. Zion 






iS 50 


Mildred 


























50 
I 00 

50 
I 70 
I 00 
I 00 
I 50 

-!. 00 

1 00 

' 35 

SO 

























5 25 


3 50 








9 00 
46 20 
9 00 






12 75 


I 25 


Oak Level 












2 00 














31 50 
62 00 
15 00 
17 35 


Poplar Springs 

Plymouth 


1 00 

2 00 


1 00 

2 00 


I 00 


I 00 


I 00 


I 00 




I 00 




















[ 
















30 00 

' II 00 
26 00 
20 00 








6 00 






' 50 

50 

t 50 

2 00 

.';0 


37 50 
50 


Robersonville 

Rock Springs 

R janoke "Rapids 

Reedy Creek 


7 50 











1 








5 00 


33 00 
20 50 




i 










TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 

PLEDGES— Concluded. 



27 



CHURCHES, 


rt 5 


< 


5 

M 

u 




5 

c 
X 


5 

in 


2 
3 





s 

< 


Minutes. 





Riddick's Grove 

Rockv Mount 

Red Bud 


$ 

60 00 


$ '$ j$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 5" 
3 00 

2 00 

75 
1 50 

I 50 

3 00 
75 

I 50 1 


$ 

63 00 










Stony Creek 


35 00 

25 00 

10 00 

15 60 

215 00 

5 00 

423 


5 00 


3 00! 


5 00 






50 00 

25 75 
Ti 50 

17 10 














Sandy Creek 




















5 25 
10 25 










4 50 














1 










I 17 
69 
50, 
25 

I 25 

1 25 

2 00, 
2 00 
I .50 i 

... 1 


6 17 

15 69 
30 50 

5 75 
32 75 

16 2=^ 
62 S5 
52 00 
52 50 
23 Co 


Tillerv ... . 


15 00 


1 














[ 








'i'urkey Branch 


1 50 
31 50 
15 00 
60 S5 

50 00 

51 00 
23 00 


50 


50 


50 


50 


I 00 


50 








































■ 
































Total 


$1,566 70 ';«;30 8o:g2S oo'$29 65^35 98545 49 '$15 29^80 26 


1,8781' 



INDIVIDUAL PLEDGES. 

G. M. Duke, Orphanage .$ 1 00 

•' " " Associatonal Missions 4 00 

2 00 

25 00 

5 00 

2 00 

2 00 

1 00 



W. M. S., Peach Tree " 

F. C. Ferguson " " 

Mrs. F. C. Ferguson " " 

W.- H. Abernathy " " 

J. R. Coggin " " 

J. J. Draper " " 

Washington church for church to be built in Martin 
10 00 



county 

Geo. May 



Asssociational Missions 5 00 



Mrs. A. C. Griffin " " 1 00 

Mr. '' '' " " ■ " 5 00 

Miss Venie Wilson '' " 100 

Mrs. Dr. Whitaker " " 5 00 

W\ M. S., Corinth " '' 3 45 

" " " Wilson " " 3 50 

Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Dickey 10 00 

Enterprise ch. S. S. Missions 1 00 

J. S. Beal Associational Missions 2 50 

A. G. Wilcox 5 00 

Total $94 45 



28 



MINUTES OF THE 




<KIMa5mMUOOUtJUOOC:fc;UKWWWW;i.rjC!OKKKJ;£,,JJ 



TAR RITER ASSOC'IATIOK. 



■'2I.» 



OiOO^OOOmro 



o mioo o lOLom 



in w. o o lo in 



o o \o ^ o o o 



o ri in rr in in o o o o o o o o o o n r-^ o m m roo 'n 



• \0 cc o o I o\ 

- ro ■ 



• r-\o fo in 



y,CC ^ rOOC uCCC inO r^(N inCN 



- > 2 
3 d"^ 



-- r; o ^ ^ a^ 



2/ _ _ > ? ■^ 

>A'-i J ^ c < 



Oncnvo r^rj <N I'-^inm'-' o o mmn inc^ 

\0 t^MD c^^CO O (T) M rJ-CC a\ O On in in-O CC' 



--co ro N \o I »n 



(N o ino o o >- o 

^o^C> "O ^ r^ ON ro O 


ro ^ in a\ .N 


Tj- in o ^ o - 

^ ^O 'O O !>. ON 


in 


in o in o 
I- -"a- r^x 


m u:; o in o \c in in M in m-o t-^ o 
:-~x in-rro i>- c-j - o\ o r-- '- o in 


VD 


vO -^00 (N 00 OO -^ O 


ro C^ On CTn in 




^ 


o in^D o 


>n o in t^ m^c o u^.x o w m t3- m 


00 



. 3 ^"2^ 






-.^1-J 



c = - = r;a- = ^ 



5S : 

c s 

Ij 3 - 



I'd : o -' 

■• '2- ■ ^ o 

~- -i CD O S w 

•^3; ■- c jj 3 z 



rt o 



'<F « 



c^-:- 









>/-. <^s^"d:- '^ 



"- S . ". ~ ! S O 

' -*:•=,„- D ■- J^ = = = ij £ "^ b in "^ 



0) ^ t 

Wo 2 



".X>U". _ . 
Ci,' J P i; «r X |s> 



-X J _; 



: o 



^ll^l: 



•=.i ;0 - 

3-CC.i x< 

C W '_. 2 la 



^X 



.u. 



,x ft! cJ (^ c u i >H,^<: a 'X. ^^,c 



• 2 : o : ! 

^|:•B:' 

_■ S S ^ o 
r ■ 5 = H V- > T3 I 









5 S-^-S 



15:2 



30 



MINUTES OF THE 



oo oooooo 

O O - O C O O lO o 
ir, O - O ^^^o CO 1^ • 



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TAR RIVER ASSOCIATIOX. 



31 



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32 



MINUTES OF THE 



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MINUTES OF THB 



S JD O "_• 






: 1,560 iS. 



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75S 21- 



Sa 09. 



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823- 69. 






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320- 7S- 



624 33. 






1,596' 7&'. 



:!53B'9i 



■ .723 22- 



6,923 89-. 






12,660 80. 






TOT A'L 



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TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 35 

RULES OF DECORUM. 



Believing it best to be governed by certain rules and 
' regulations in conducting the business of this Association, 
v^e adopt the following: 

1. The Association shall be opened and closed w^ith 
prayer. 

2. Not more than one person shall speak at a time, vv^ho 
shall rise from his seat and address the Moderator. 

3. The person thus speaking shall not be interrupted, 
unless he violates some rule of decorum. 

4. The person speaking shall adhere strictly to the sub- 
ject, and in nowise reflect on any other brother. 

5. No brother shall absent himself from the Association 
without obtaining permission from the body. 

0. No brother shall speak more than twice on the same 
subject without unanimous consent. 

7. No person shall whisper while a brother is speaking. 

8. The names of the delegates shall be enrolled by the 
Clerk, and called as often as the Association requires. 

9. The Moderator may give his ideas on any subject 
before putting it to the vote, but is entitled to vote only 
in case of a tie. 

10. An order of business shall be made at the begin- 
ning of each session, and shall be changed only by vote 
of the body. 

CONSTITUTION. 



1. The Association shall be composed of the pastors and 
of the members chosen by the churches who shall produce 
letters certifying their appointment. Members thus chosen 
and convened, together with the pastors, shall be denom- 
inated TUK Tar River Baptist Association, which 
shall have no power over the churches, nor shall it in- 
fringe on any of their rights. 

2. The letters from the churches shall contain the num- 
ber then in fellowship and of those baptized, received by 
letter, dismissed, excluded and died since last Association. 

3. The <»fficers of the Association shall be a Moderator, 
Clerk, Treasurer and Historian, who shall be chosen by 
the suffrages of the members present. 

4. Other churches, upon petition by letter and by dele- 
'gsites, and after a satisfactory examination of their Ar- 



oO MINUTES OF THE 

tides of Faith, may be admitted to the body by a unani- 
mous vote, when the Moderator shall give to their dele- 
gates the right hand of fellowship. 

5. Every church in this Association is entitled to one 
representative, but no church more than three. 

6. Every motion made and seconded shall be left to the 
discretion of the Association whether it may be debated 
or not. 

7. The Association shall endeavor to furnish the 
churches with copies of its Minutes. 

8. The Minutes of the Association shall be read and ap- 
proved, and shall be signed by the Moderator and Clerk 
before the Association adjourns. 

9. Any church not repi'esenting itself in this body for 
three successive sessions, by letter or delegates, shall be 
stricken from the roll of the churches, unless satisfactory 
reasons are assigned. 

10. The Association shall withdraw fellowship from any 
church which shall be found disordei'ly in faith or 
practice. 

11. A^isiting brethren from sister churches, or similar 
bodies, may be invited to participate in our deliberations. 

12. At each session of the Association delegates to the 
Baptist State Convention and to the Southern Baptist 
Convention shall be chosen by vote. 

13. This Constitution is subject to alteration by a ma- 
jority vote of the delegates enrolled at any session. 

14. The business of the Association shall be conducted 
according to Mell's Parlimentary Practice. 

ARTICLES OF FAITH 

ADOPTED BY THE TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION, OCTOBER, 1833. 

• 

We Believe:— 

1. That God made the world and all things therein, see- 
ing that He is Lord of heaven and earth; also, that there 
are three that bear record in heaven — the Father, the 
Word, and the Holy Ghost; and these three are one. — 
Acts xvii; 24, 1 John v: 7. 

2. That in the beginning was the Word, and the Word 
was with God, and the Word was God; also that the 
Word was made flesh and dwelt among us. — John i; 1-14. 

3. That in the beginning God created the heavens and 
the earth: that He created man in His own image ;that He 



TAK RIVER ASSnciATKiN. 37 

saw everything that Heht'd made, and l»ehold it was very 
good. — Gen. i. 27. 31. 

4. That as sin entered into the woi-ld and death by sin, 
and so death passed upon all men foi- that all have sinned, 
even so all are by nature dead in trespasses and sins. — 
Rom. v: 12, Eph.ii: 1 

5. That all Scriptui'e is given by i)ispii-ation of God, and 
is profitable for doctrine, foj- reproof, for correction, for 
instruction in i-ighteousness: that tlie will of God ma}" be 
perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works. — I 
Tim. iii. IG 17. 

'). That the Son of inan is come to seek and to save that 
which was lost; and that we joy in God through our Lord 
Jesus Christ by whom we have now vecfived the atone- 
ment. — Luke xix: 10. Romans v: 11. 

7. That God now commandeth all men everywhere to 
]"epent: and he that belie^eth and is baptized shall be 
saved, but he that believeth not shall be damned. — Acts 
xvii; 30, Mark xvi; IC. 

8. That there is one Loi'd. one faitli and one baptism; 
and that therefore we are buried with Him by baptism 
into death, that like as Christ was raised from the dead 
by the glory of the Fathei*. even so we also should walk 
in newness of life. — Eph. iv: .5. Rom. vi: 4. 

9. That the Holy Spirit reproves the world of sin. and 
of righteousness, and of judgment: also that He hath 
quickened us together with Christ. — .lohn xvi- 8. Eph. ii:5. 

10. That by grace ye are saved througli faith, and that 
not of yourselves, it is the gift af God: not of works lest 
any man should boast. — Eph. ii: 8, '.). 

11. That God hath blessed us with all spiritual blessings 
in heavenly places in Christ, according as He hath chosen 
us in Him before the foundation of the world, that we 
should be holy and without blame before Him in love: 
tliat He hath chosen us from the beginning unto salva- 
tion through sanctification of the Spirit and belief of the 
truth.— Eph. i: 1. 2. 3. 4. 11: Thes. ii: lo. 

12. That we are justified by faith that works by love. — 
Rom. v; 1. 

13. That we are kept by the power of God, tlirovigh faith. 
unto salvation ready to be revealed in the last time.-- 
I Peter i; 5. 

14. That there shall be a resurrection of the dead, both 
of the just and the unjust, who shall come forth; they that 
have done good, unto the resurrection of life, and they 
that have done evil unto the resurrection of damnation. -- 
Acts xxiv; 15, John v: 25. 






MINUTES 

OF THE 



^euentu=tJ hlro >^nnuai Session 



OF THE 



Uar ^Jvwer ^dissociation 

7<eld With the 6 hunch in ^ocky ^Mount. 
•^lash (bounty, 

October 6t/i, 7t/i and 8th, 7903 

The Next Session to Be Held With the Church at Maple 

Springs, Franklin County, Beginning on Tuesday 

After the 1st Sunday in October, 1904, 

at 11 O'clock. 



TO PREACH INTRODUCTORY SERMON, T. J. TAYLOR, 
ALTERNATE, M. L. KESLER. 



OFFICERS: 



T. M. ARRINGTON, Moderator, - ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 
A. G. WILCOX, Clerk and Treas., - SPRING HOPE, N. C. 



1903: 
ROCKY MOUNT MOTOR POWER PRESSES. 



MINUTES 

OF THE 



C^eDentu=iJ hire >^rLnual Session 



OF THE 



Uar Kyvloer ^dissociation 

^eld nith the (3/iunc/i in c/ioc/ii/ ^myftount, 
^^/fasA bounty, 

October 6t/i, 7t/i and 8tA, 7903 

The Next Session to Be Held With the Church at Maple 

Springs, Franklin County, Beginning on Tuesday 

After the 1st Sunday in October, 1904, 

at 11 O'clock. 



TO PREACH INTRODUCTORY SERMON, T. J. TAYLOR, 
ALTERNATE, M. L. KESLER. 



OFFICERS; 



T. M. ARRINGTON, Moderator, - ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 
A. G. WILCOX, Clerk and Treas., - SPRI NG HOPE. N. C. 



1903: 
ROCKY MOUNT MOTOR POWER PRESSES. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 



N. BIGGS, 
F. C. FERGUSON. 



T. B. WILDER, 
W. H. RAGSDALE, 



E. W. SHEARIM, 
T. M. ARRINGTON. 



STAISDiNCi COMMITTEES. 



Aged Ministers M. L. Kesler. 

Orphanage B. Cra . 

Home Missions J. K. Howell. 

State Missions J. W. Morgan. 

Foreign Missions J. D. Larkins . 

Associationai Missions G. M. Duke, 

Education N . L. Gaskin. 

Sunday Schools E. E. Hilliard. 

Temperance G. W. May. 

Periodicals B. K. Mason. 

Woman's Work Josiah Crudup. 



PASTORS AND POSTOFFICES. 



E. C. Andrews, Durham. 

R. D. Carroil, Elm City. 

G. W. Coppeage, Wakefield. 

B. Craig, Pocky Mount. 

A. Cree, Embro. 

Crutchfield, Tarboro, 

Josiah Crudup, v\'ashington. 

W. R. Cudom, Wake Forest. 

G. M. Duke, Mapl^ville. 

Ben Dunn, Wise. 

R. D. Darrdu, Elm City. 

J. J. Douglass, Wilson. 

J. T. Edmundson, Littleton. 

N. L. Gaskins, Enfield. 

J. A. Garrett, Roanoke Rapids. 

J. E. Hocutt, Bethel. 

G. W. Holmes, Elpsom. 

J. K. Howell, Rocky Mount. 

J. E. Haywood. Dry Wells. 

M. L. Kesler, Scotland Neck. 



A. T. King, Greenville. 

B. Leggett. Windsor. 

J. D. Larkin, Henderson. 

G. W. May, Red Oak. 

G. A. Martin, Rocky Mount. 

B. K. Mason, Williamston. 
H. H. Mashburr, Louisburg. 
J. W. Morgan, Weldon. 

J. D. Morriss, Rileys. 
G. L. Merrell, Hobeoo u 
W. C. Nowe 1, Nashville. 
J. W. Rose, Plymouth. 
N. O. Rosser, Essex. 
J. A. Stradley, Oxford. 
J. W. Sledge, Cedar Rock. 

C. A. Upchurch, Gary. 
T. J. Taylor, Warren ton. 
C C. Williams, Royal. 

R. P. Walker, Henderson. 
A. G. Willard, Spring Hope. 



^> 



ou 



roceeoinas. 



Rocky Mount, N. C, Oct. 6, 1903. 

The seventy-third annual session of the Tar River Association met 
here to-night. The association was called to order by Moderator and 
led in prayer by Bro. Duke. Scripture read by Bro R. D. Carroll. Bro. 
H. H. Mashburn of Louisburg, preached introductory sermon, text 1st 
John 2:8. Bro. Craig, the pastor, gave a brief sketch of the history 
of the church, and extended to the delegates and visitors a hearty 
welcome. Bro. A. G. Dixon, pastor of the M. P. church, for the 
Christians of the town extended to the body a most cordial welcome, 
which was very happily responded to by Bro. Crudup, of Washington. 
Roll of churches was called and the following reported by delegates or 
letter: 

• Antioch— J. R. Parker, L. J. Hamill. 
Bethel-T. A. Carson. 

Bethlehem— J. A. Carter, C. D. Hemmings. 
Battleboro— W, A. Harrison, J. T. Moore. 
Bear Swamp— Walson Bowers. W. E. Bowers, Jim Collins. 
Browns— J. W. Smithv/ick, Jim Smithwick. 
Gary's Chapel-C. E. Hoile, E. T. Puckett. 
Castalia— John Thomas Nichols, Joseph Caps, W. Strickland. 
Cedar Rock— J. B. Glasgow, R. B. Gilliam. 
Cedar Branch— 

Conoconara— J. P. Ellen, Jas. A. Pope. 
Conoho-G. L. Merrell. 
Crocker's Chapel -E. H. Crocker. 
Corinth-J. F. Wilson, T. G. Dean, W. H. Harris. 
Cypress Chapel-W. J. Wilder, M. T. Wilder. 
Dawsons— Tom Pope, N. H. Barnhill. 
Eagles -R. D. Carroll. 
Elm Grove— 

Elm City— B. Chears, R. Adams, J. H. Barkley. 
Enterprise -Flethm Bobbitt, T. D. King. 
Enfield- S. S. Alsop, E. L. Pike. 

Ephesus— W. H. Abernathy, L. M. Edwards, S. S. Hendrick. 
Everetts, J. A. Whitly, John Winstead. 
Fishing Creek— Arthur J. Shearin, Jas, R. Saunders. 
Gardners— By letter. 

Gethsemane— O. L. Pittman, J. T. Sixton. 
Greenville- W. H. Ragsdale, A. T. King. 
Halifax— N. L. Gaskins. 
Hamilton— 

Harn's Chapel -H. S. Quails, W. H. Mabry, W. E. Mabry. 
Hickory- S. B. Dozier, P. H. Smith, W. S. Dozier. 
Hobgood— G. L. Merrell, R. J. Shearin. 
Henderson— J. D. Larkin. 



4. MINUTES OF THE 

John's Chapel— Geo. Coppedge, J. P. Underwood. 

Littleton— Eugene Bobbitt, W. R. Harvey. - j. 

Louisburg— E. S. Green, Ivey Allen, T. B. Wilder. 

Macon— Tom Allan, A. L. Nicholson. 

Macedonia— K. E. Joyner, G. J. Joyner. 

Marmaduke-M. T. Duke. W. C. Haithcock. 

Maple Springs— G. M Duke. 

Middleburg— R. L. Bennett. 

Mildred-T. J. Crisp. 

Mt. Hebron-R. A. Denton, W. H. Culifer, Arch Bobbitt. 

Mt. Zion— W. T. Cooper, J. H. Harper, 

Nashville — L. M. Conyers. 

New Bethel-J. A. Shepard, W. L. Duke. 

New Hope— Bryant Rice, Wm. H. White, L. E. White. 

North Henderson— R. P. Walker. 

North Rocky Mount— F. C. Ferguson. 

Oak Level— J. A. Daughtridge, T. A. Bone,. 

Pactolus— J. E. Hocutt. 

Peach Tree-H. A. Hines, A. H. Edwards, B. L. Holland. 

Plymouth— J. W. Rose. 

Philadelphia-M. S. Griffin, W. B. Bunting. 

Poplar Springs— J. H. Cheans, J. R. Wright. 

Quankie— J. W. Morgan. 

Reedy Creek — Elhs H. Neal, Robert T. Ptitman, Jos. Stallings. 

Red Oak-W. H. Faulkner, W. H. Jones, H. D. Griffin. 

Red Bud— Riddick's Grove — 

Roanoke Rapids— By letter. 

Robersonville— Jas. W. Rose. 

Rocky Mount— T. M. Arrington, W. H. Lancaster, E. W. Shearin. 

Rock Springs— B. F. Wilder. 

Rosemary- 
Stony Creek-John H. Thorp, J. J. Coley, C. F. Ellen. 

Samaria— D. S Cone, J. R. Weathersby, J. H. Murray. 

Scotland Neck— Noah Biggs, R. M. Johnson, E. E. HiUiard. 

Spring Hope— By letter. 

Sharon— J. T. Edmundson. 

South Henderson— R. P. Walker. 

Social Plains— By letter. 

Stanhope— is. R. Pearce, Thomas Westray. 

Sandy Creek— G. M. Duke. 

Sulphur Springs— A. A. Jones. 

Turkey Branch— L. E. Hull, Perrv Thomas, Jonas Avent. 

Tillery-J. K. Howell. 

Tarboro— N. S. Lewis. 

Williamston— 

Warren Plains— 

Warrenton— 

Washington— E. L. Dawson, E. B. Oliver, H. L. Nelms. 

Weldon— J. W. Morgan. 

Wilson— H. J. Hester. 

Roll of churches being completed, a quorum found to be present, the 
association went into a permanent organization with the election of 
Bro. T. M. Arrington as Moderator ; Bro. A. G. Wilcox as clerk and 
treasurer, and Bro. G. M. Duke as historian. 

The Moderator appointed the following committees: On order of bus 
iness, Josiah Crudup and S. S. Alsop; Finance Committee: Ivey Allen, 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION 5 

F. C. Ferguson and E. L. Dawson; Religious exercises, B. Craig and 
the Deacons of the church at Rocky Mount; Auditor, T. B. Wilder. 

A call was made for new pastors coming into the association since the 
last session and the following responded: G. A. Martin. J. W. Moi'gan, 
A. T. King, N. L. Gaskins, E. C. Andrews. J. D. Larkm, H. S. . ay- 
wood and J. J. Marshall. 

Invitation was extended to visiting brethren to seats in our body and 
was accepted by Bro R. T. Vann of the Baptist Female University, Bro. 
J. B. Boone, of the Orphanage, Bro. S. F. Conrad of the North Carolina 
Baptist, J. S. Farmer of the Biblical Recorder. Rev. A. G. Dixon, pas- 
tor of the M. P. church, was recognized and welcomed to a seat with us. 

The committee on orderof business made a partial report as follows: 
To meet on Wednesday at 9:30. Religious services for 30 minutues. 
10 o'clock orphanage. 11 o'clock State missions, which was adopted. 
Adjourned, benediction by Bro. R. D. Carroll. 



Wednesday, 9:30 o'clock. 

Association met and spent half an hour in prayer and pi'aise service led 
by Bro. Corpening. Minutes of day before read and adopted. 

PTour for special order having arrived, report on orphanage was read 
by Bro. Corpening for Bro. Biggs. Bro. Boone followed the report in an 
instructive address. Bro. Duke also made an address of great beauty 
and tenderness after which a cash collection amounting to $30.86 was 
taken, and the report was adopted. 

REPORT ON THE ORPHANAGE. 

Eighteen years ago last January J. H. Mills, as General Manager, 
took charge of the Thomasville Baptist Orphanage. In November of 
that year the first orphan was received. These years of glorious histoiy 
amply vindicate the venture of those who founded the institution in the 
face of strong and surprising opposition. During this time about eight 
hundred oruhans have been received within her walls. More than five 
hundred have gone out and two hundred and sixty are there now being 
cared for. Some who have gone out found pleasant homes early, but 
the majority remained the allotted time, receiving all the training and 
education the Orphanage could give. Many of the boys have fouud 
good business positions, thus taking a fair stand in the ranks of busy 
men. 

THE EQUIPMENT. 

The Orphanage has seven dormitories. Four of these have kitchens 
built separate from themselves. But in the near future one central 
kitchen and dinmg room will take their place. Of these dormitories two 
are nurseries for the smaller children, one for boys and one for girls. 
Each of these has its own kitchen and play room attached. In all there 
are nineteen brick building-s on the ground— the Printing Office, Chapel, 
Infirmary, Central Building and Mills Memorial Building (machine 
shops) are included in this number. The Central Building is used for 
school purposes and for all gatherings. We also have a home for the 
General Manager and one for the Treasurer, who is also superintendent 
of the farm. The farm contains about three hundred and fifty acres of 
land with the usual farm buildings, stock and machinery. A system of 
water-works is being put in whic will add greatly to the health and 
convenience of the institution. No small paii of the equipment is 



6 MINUTES OF THE 

Charity and Children, one of our brightest papers, with a job depart- 
ment prepared to do excellent work. The entire Orphanage plant, up 
to date, has cost between fifty and sixty thousand dollars. This does 
not include recent legacies. 

ITS WORK. 
The first thing the Orphanage undertakes to do is to furnish, as nearly 
as possible, what the child has lost, a home; to give him warm clothes 
and good food, and to convince him that he is not alone in the world. 
The strong hand of the General Manager, the^ motherly care of Mrs. 
Boone, and the constant attention of the seven matrons and seven • 
teachers, all cultured and refined women, supply what has been lost as 
far as it can be supp ied. The school advantages are especially fi.ne. 
Mr. Boone, who organized the first graded school in the State, in Char- 
lotte, has here one of the best graded schools in the State. The farm, 
machine shops, shoe shop and printing office furnish splendid advan- 
tages for the boys to learn how to work at profitable trades, and the 
girls learn to make and care for their own clothes, and have experi- 
ence with usual household duties. Any bright girl can get a first grade 
certificate to teach school after having taken advantage of the Orphan- 
age school. The best Sunday school and church advantages are given 
them aid there is hardly abetter little church in the State than the 
Orphanage church. 

THE PROSPECTS. 

We have been praying for more buildings. They are here. Mr. J. C. 
Whitty, of Newberne, is erecting a building in honor of his daughter. 
The walls are already up. Two others will go up in the near future, 
one by Mr. E. F. Aydlett, of Elizabeth City, and the other by the 
Chowan Association. These with the improvements on the Mitchell and 
Watson buildings, will increase the capacity to four hundred. This call^ 
for an increase of contributions of about one hundred per cent, above 
that of last year. And it is to be borne in mind that the legacies of 
Simmons and Faircloth do not go to the current expenses. The door of 
opportuniiy stands wide, inviting the whole denomination to go in and 
meet the demand. There are between 10,000 and 12,000 orphans in this State. 
One half of these appeal to the Baptists for help. There are in 
in all the orphanages less than one thousand childi'en. One cared for, 
where are the nine ? The management of the Orphanage is on the 
principle that the people's money is a sacred trust. The cost this year for 
feeding, clothing, doctoring and teaching an orphan is $4.84. Take from 
this $3,000 made by the farm and Charity and Children and the cost is 
about $3.50. We urge the taking of Charity and Children by our Sun- 
day schools. It is $1.00 per single copy, 60 cents in clubs of ten or more. 
We further urge that the Sunday schools set apart one Sunday in each 
month for making a contribution to the Orphanage, and that they set for 
themselves a definite amount to raise. It is more easily raised, and the 
amount will grow. Many schools have started with $5.00 a month, and 
have gone on to $20 and $25, and have raised it as easily as the smaller 
amounts. When all the churches and Sunday schools together reach o 
to help no destitute child will be turned away. N. BiGGS. 

Report on Orphanage was read by Bro. Corpening for Bro. Biggs. 
Bro. Boone followed the report in an instructive address. Bro. Duke also 
made an address of great beauty and tenderness, after which a cash col- 
lection amounting to $80.86 was made, after which the report was 
adopted. 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 7 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 

Report on State Missions was called for, and Bro. Kesler read the re- 
port as follows : 

STATE MISSIONS. 

We have slowly made our way to this time when State misssions 
means State-wide missions. We are one convention from the mountains 
to the sea, and in real unity of purpose and effort we are so well agreed 
on the present policy of State evangelization that it is no longer a ques- 
tion of debate. Our policy is that all parts of the State shall reach out 
at once and help the most destitute sections. South, East, West and 
Middle Carolina join hands in mutual help. This serves the double pur- 
pose of bringing about a sympathetic understanding between the differ- 
ent sections widely separated, and als6 of placing the whole brotherhood 
behind each point of need. Thus Western North Carolina has become a 
new land to us, for we all have had a part in the new awakening of the 
mighty forces slumbering there. Tneir zeal for building schools, and for 
progress in their churches generally is the joy of the whole State. The 
whole convention hears the hum of industry in the Piedmont section, 
and realizes the changed condition of thousands who have moved into 
the manufacturing towns. These, many of them, have moved in from 
the old country, it is true, but as they come into these new relations they 
must look to the State Board for help. And this is help that admits of 
no delay. In the East the conditions are old. This has broken like a 
revelation upon many of the people of the State. In some sections isms 
abound. The territory occupied largely by the Tar River Association is 
unusually free from these isms, but the body of the people are adrift on 
the wide sea of stubborn unbelief. The work is far from being done. 
Any one of the great sections mentioned could use with profit the whole 
$25,000 to be raised this year. The needs of the work call for an in- 
crease of $5,000 for another year. Hence we urge an increased contri- 
bution of 25 per cent, for the coming year, and also suggest a collection 
from all our churches between this and the convention, that we fall not 
behind in our share of the $25,000 for the work already done. 

M. L. Kesler. 

Bro. Livingston Johnson, corresponding secretary, followed in a thrill- 
ing address, after which the report was adopted. 

New churches making application for admission into our body were 
called for, and Vaughns and New Sandy Creek applied. A committee 
consisting of Brethren W. R. Cullom, G. L. Merrill and R. M. Johnson 
were appointed to examine their church covenant, articles of faith, etc., 
who afterwards reported as follows : 

Your committee on new churches have examined the covenant and ar- 
ticles of faith of the Baptist church at Vaughns and New Sandy Creek 
Baptist churches and found them entirely satisfactory. We therefore 
recommend that these churches be accepted into this body. 

W. R. CULLOM, 
G. L. Merrell, 
R. M. Johnson. 

The right hand of fellowship was extended to the delegates. 



8 MINUTES OF THE 

Committee on Order of Business reports as follows : Wednesday, 2:30 
p. m. , Periodicals; 3:30, Education ; 8:00, AssociationalMissions. Thurs- 
day— 9:30, Devotional Exercises; 10:00, Foreign Missions; 11:00, Home 
Missions ; 2:30, Sunday Schools ; 3:00, Aged Ministers; 3:30, Miscella- 
neous Business; 8:00, Temperance. 

Adjourned with prayer by Bro. Larkins. 

Wednesday 2:30— The Association was called to order and led in 
prayer by Bro. Marshall. Committee on Time, Place and Preacher was 
appointed as follows : G. L. Merrell, John H. Thorp and J. Walter 
Smith wick. 

REPORT ON PERIODICALS. 

"Reading makes a full man '" "Give yourself to reading." 
For the benefit of the Baptists of North Carolina there are three re- 
ligious papers published. The Biblica) Recorder, organ of Baptists of the 
State. It is necessary for the people to be always posted upon doctrine and 
upon the workings of the convention. The North Carolina Baptist, 
which has a peculiar as well as an important work among the people as 
a one dollar paper is ours. Charity and Children, which keeps us posted 
upon the conditions and necessities of the nursery of the convention. 
And without this knowledge as an appeal to sympathy I don't see how 
either a Baptist individual or 'church can grow. Then the Foreign Mis- 
sion Journal, an organ of the Southern Baptist Convention. With an 
almost unparallelled cheapness in our periodicals, and the rural free 
delivery placing them in easy reach of the people, it is almost inexcusa- 
ble for a Baptist home to be without one or all of these papers. This is 
a reading age, and it is the duty of parents to see that the minds of 
their children are not poisoned with red journalism. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. D. Larkins. 
The report on Periodicals was read by Bro. Larkins and Brethren Far- 
mer, of the Recorder, and Conrad, of the North Carolina Baptist, spoke 
to it, af er which the report was adopted. 

REPORT ON education. 

Your committee is glad to note in its report that interest in general 
education in our State was never so widespread nor so deep as at pres- 
ent. In this there is promise and hope. It is, therefore, timely to urge 
upon Baptists everywhere their duty as citizens to work earnestly and 
persistently for longer terms, better equipment and greater efficiency in 
our free public schools, to establish and maintain high schools under 
Christian influences, and to give moral and financial support to our de- 
nominational colleges and Theological Seminary. Baptists whose strug- 
gles for civil and religious liberty, the rights of citizenship and the 
higher rights of conscience, have made glorious many a page of history, 
will make no truce, much less lay down arms, in the righteous cause of 
education, until the humblest child in the most remote mountain district 
has access to good schools, and the opportunity to become an intelligent 
and useful citiz'.n. Nor should we be satisfied with a ministry inferior 
in training to the best possible for our colleges and seminary to send 
forth. The importance of education is not easily overestimated ; the 
contrai-y is lamentably too frequent. The word is so familiar that we 
do not stop to think of what it means. A distinguished educator, a lit- 
tle while ago, splendidly defined education as "any training by which are 
developed individual power and poise. By power is meant the capacity 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATl'^.X. 9 

clearly to concentrate and steadily accomplish a given end. But this 
force should be regulated by a sense of proportion and good judsimtnt 
which may be expressed by the word poise." Education as a finished 
product is broad culture founded on manly character. But the best sort 
of character exists not apart from supremely unselfish devotion to 
Christ, and the Christian college, the college having Christ as its founda- 
tion, and His service as its pure purpose, alone can bring into its full- 
ness such culture grounded in such character. Your committee believes 
that Wake Forest College, the Baptist Female University. Chowan Bap- 
tist Female Institute, Oxford Female Seminary and o^her institutions 
under Baptist control in North Carolina, are striving to serve our people 
in this high and blessed way, and richly merit their confidence and pat- 
ronage. The Baptist Female University is in urgent need of another 
dormitory. For want of room more than fifty girls who were ready and 
anxious to enter its classes this year have had to remain at home or go 
to other institutions. Then, too, a Music Hall is well nigh a necessity, 
if the institution is to do its best work. There remains urpaid al out 
814,000 of the Century Fund. All our pastors are urged to take a col- 
lection for this purpose during the year. The Board of Education. Prof. 
W. R. Cullom, corresponding secretary, is entitled to the sympathy and 
help of all our churches. 

H. H. Mashburx. 

Report on Education was called for, and in the absence of the report 
Bro. VV. K. Cullom made an able address. The report was then read by 
Bro. Mashburn, after which Bro. Vann, in his inimitable way set forth 
the needs and demands of the University. Pledges for said object were 
taken as follows: Rocky Mount, SlOO: Scotland Neck. SlOO; Stonv 
Creek, .S2.5; Bethel, S5.00; Bear Swamp, .S2.00: Antioch, S2.00; Enter- 
prise, S5.00; Green v-ille, S2.5; Hickory. i5.00; Marmaduke, S2.00: J. W. 

Rose, $5.00; Tillery, S5.00; Tarboro, ; Weldon, S25. Total. S306. 

Churches that did not make specific pledges promised collections by 
January 1st. The Exectitive Tomn'iittee for next vear was appointed 
as follows: N. Biggs, E. W. Shearin, T. B. Wilder, F. C. Ferguson, W. 
H. Ragsdale and T. Ai. Arrington. 

Adjourned with prayer by Bro. Merrell. 

W^edxesday, 8 p. M. 

The Association reassembled and was led in prayer by Bro. Edmund- 
son. The Committee on Digest of Church Letters was appointed as fol- 
lows: Josiaii Crudup, S. V. T. Cha^iblee. 

The Committee on Time. Place and Preacher reported as follows: 
Maple Springs, Tuesday after 1st Sunday in October, 1904, at 11 o'clock. 
To preach introductory sermon, T. J. Taylor; alternate, M. L. Kesler. 

G. L. Merrell. 
J. W. Smithwick, 
J. H. Thorp. 

Associational Missions next claimed the attention of the body. The 
report was read by Bro. Craig. 

REPORT ON ASSOCL\TIONAL MISSIONS. 

For a quarter of a century we have been engaged in A.ssoc'ational 
Missions in an organized way. Long before this so.: e of our l rethren, 
notaijly Bros. Hufham and Duke were actively engagtd in doing n-'S- 



10 MINUTES OF THE 

sion work within tiie bounds of the Tar River Association. In the last 
twenty-five years our growth has been marvelous. In spite of great 
opposition we have grown from twenty-nine to eighty-six churches. 
This year we have built two new churches and have two others started. 
While we have accomplished much and should be profoundly grateful, 
there remains much work to be done. 

NEEDS OF THE FIELD. 

In the upper part of our Association, we have about as many churches 
as we need, bur many of the churches need developing. Many of them 
are weak, but much stronger than they th nk. Ojc pastors have had to 
preach at too many churches and do manual labor in order to live. These 
noble men are to be com.mended for thtir work and service, but it is the 
opinion of your committee that our pastors should have fewer churches 
in order that more time could be devoted to each church, and more at- 
tention given to the various objects of our boards and that th church be 
developed along all lines of benevolence. In order to do this our 
churches will have to increase the salary of the pastors so they can 
claim his time. In the lower part of the Association, we nee i more 
churches, more men and more money. We are profoundly grateful to 
state that Bro. T. L. ivierrell has just completed a church in Edgecombe 
coa'i'.y, praicicaliy oat of debt. Phis matces the fifth church in Edge- 
combe. We ought to have at least fifteen. We are grateful to God that 
Bro. Crisp has begun a church in Martin county, and expects soon to 
have it finished. This church is in the midsi: of a thickly settled terri- 
tory, and theie is no other church nearby. Bro. Rose has finished a 
church in the growing town of Robersonville, and Bro. McLeod one in 
the lower end of Beaufort county. The Lord has abundan ly blessed 
our missionaries this year; near.y all report baptisms, one reporting 100. 
Last year our missionaries reported 188 baptism ; this year they report 
221. Truly, we believe that the hand of God is leading us and that He 
has laid upon us the great privilege of giving the people of Eastern 
North Carolina the gospel. Brethren, let us be faithful to do our duty, 
remembering that the eyes of God are upon us. Let us buckle on the 
armour and rest not until this land shall be taken for the Master. 

Braxton Craig, 
Committee. 

After some stirring speeches by Brethren Duke and Craig, the roll of 
churches was called and amounts as follows were pledged : 

Scotland Neck $250 00 Louisburg $150 00 

Henderson 100 00 Rocky Mount 100 00 

North Rocky Mount 65 00 Poplar Springs 56 25 

Maple Springs 40 00 Washington 65 00 

Weidon 55 00 Warrenton 50 00 

Williamston 40 00 Stony Creek 35 00 

Tarboro 32 50 Greenville 30 00 

Philadelphia 30 00 Roanoke Rapids 30 00 

Brown's 27 50 Corinth 25 00 

Dawson's pd 25 00 Elm City 25 00 

Enfield 25 00 Littleton 25 00 

New Bethel 25 00 Red Oak 25 00 

Sharon 25 00 Warren Plains 20 00 

Conoco.iary 20 03 Fishing Creek 20 00 

Gethsemane 20 00 t?pring Hope 20 00 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION 



11 



Hobgood $ 

Tillei-v 

Mt. Zion 

Hai-ris' Chapel 

Battleboro 

Cypress Chapel 

Hickory pd 

Oak Level 

Samaria 

Castalia 

Macon 

Vaughns 

Eagles 

Everetts 

Mt. Hebr n 

Pactolus 

Q ankie. . , .' 

South Henderson 

Cary Chapel 

Marrnaduke 

Bethlehem 

Elm Grove 

Robersonville 

Sulphur Springs 

Johns Chapel 

Total 



20 00 Hamilton 

18 75 Sandy Creek 

18 00 Reedy Creek 

17 50 Middieburg 

15 00 Cedar Rock 

15 00 Ephe?us 

15 00 New Hope 

15 00 Pleasant Grove... 

15 GO Bethel 

12 50 Peacli Tree 

12 00 Stanhope 

10 00 Antioch 

10 00 Enterorise 

10 00 Mildred 

10 00 North Henderson.. 

10 00 Plvmouth 

10 00 Rock Soring 

10 00 iMacedonia 

6 00 Conoho 

6 00 Turkey Branch.... 

5 00 Crocker's Chapel.. 

5 00 Halifax 

5 00 Social 

5 00 J. R. Wrieh^ 

2 50 New Sandy Creek 



.pd 



20 00 


18 


00 


16 00 


17 


50 


15 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


12 


50 


12 


50 


11 


00 


10 


CO 


10 


00 


10 00 


15 


00 


10 


00 


12 


00 


7 


50 


6 00 


6 


00 


_" 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 



.$2,010.00 



After which the report was adopted. 
Adjourned with prayer by Bro. Howell. 



Thursd.w, 9:30 a. m. 



The Association upon re-assembling was led in prayer service by Bro. 
K. P. Walker. The minutes of yesterday's session were read, approved 

and adopted. 

The report on Foreign Missions was read by Bro. Kesler for Bro. Tay- 
lor. 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

God, not William Care J', is author of missions; "for God so loved the 
woi'ld that he gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in 
Him should not perish, but have everlasting life." God is the author of 
missions and Jesus was the first missionary, for he came from heaven 
into this world "to seek and to save that which was lost." When He 
went back to Him that sent H-'m, He committed His work to His dis- 
ciples, and said unto them, "go ye, therefore, teach all nations, bap- 
tizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy 
Ghost." Being, therefore, the disciples of Christ, we are in the line of 
succession, and are acting under the great commission which he gave to 
them are b:)und by the comnand which he laid upon them, and if we are 
loyal to Him, must faithfully prosecute the work of seeking and saving 
the lost, which he c«*mmitted to his disciples. 

The mission of Christ was world-wide in its scope. Though He lived 
in Palistine and rarely went bevond the borders of His own coun^rj-. His 
loving heart embraced the whole world; His purpose was to save the 



12 



MINUTES OF THE 



who]e woild, and his command to His dirciples was "go ye into all the 
world." The Spirit of Christ is the spirit of world-wide ev?ngelisnr>. 

[f we have His spirit we will endeavor to t ear witness unto Him, not 
only in onr own church, in our own community, in our own Association, 
in our own country, but "unto the uttermost parts of the earth. " If 
this is not our purpose at d efforts, then we have not the Spirit of Christ, 
and "if any man have not the Spirit of Christ, he is none of His." 

Satan is a great enemy of God and is opposed to every effort that 
has for its end the glory of God. He is, therefore, the enemy of mis- 
sions, both home and foreign, and all who oppose missionary efforts at 
home and in foreign lands are in this re:ipect acting in full accord with 
the devil. 

In seeking to carry out the commission of our Lord we have for con- 
venience divided our mission work into various departments, viz: Asso- 
ciatioial, State, Home and Foreign Missions. The work of preaching 
the gospel to the lost in foreign lands is entrusted to a comirittee or 
board composed of prudent and godly men, who are giving their best 
effoits to this work. This board is located in Richmond, Va. The board 
IS very careful of the Lord's money, and during the past year so man- 
aged the money entrust? d *o it that only ten and a half cents out of 
every dolltjr was spent in the business of the board, and eighty-nine and 
a half cents out of every dollar actually went to the support of the mis- 
sionaries. 

To show the spirit of the men who are conduc'ing our foreign mission 
affairs, it may be well to mention that Dr. Willingham, the consecrated 
secretary of the boa'd, voluntarily relinquished five hundred dollars of 
h s salary in favor of the board. 

Our foreign mission work has been greatly blessed. For the past six 
years receipts have been equal to expenses, and there has been no debt, 
and the work has been continually enlarging. During the lastfi\e years 
eighty-five new missionaries have beer, sent out into the foreign field. 
The following table prepared by the board will show the progress made 
during the past six years: 

STATISTICAL TABLE. 





in 










u 








m 








a 


'S 


CU 


r^ 


ra 


A 


<A 


ffi 


OJ 


s 


u 


S 


01 

> 


-C 


m 


O 


o 




^ 




u 




S 






3 




i 


:z 


O 


m 


§ 



1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 



76 


117 


102 


701 


4760 


82 


128 


100 


845 


5347 


94 


133 


113 


1341 


6537 


102 


171 


127 


1009 


6773 


115 


171 


139 


1439 


7821 


127 


192 


157 


1790 


8880 



$124,249 69 
109,267 43 
140,102 30 
156,083 33 
173,439 49 
218,512 62 



Wp have missionaries in China, Africa, Japan, Italy, Mexico and Bra- 
zil, and are just opening a mission in the Argentine Republic. The table 
below indicates tne condition of our work in various fields: 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION 



13 







Mission- 


«3 
^ 01 


Unordained 
Native 










aries. 


■sS- 


Helpers. 














Ib 








COUNTRIES. 






.£3 


















M 




O 




-2 


0) 






S 






s 


p2 


£ 




^ 


s 


-(-> 
& 


S 






^ 


01 


o 


§ 


CD 


rt 

m 


§ 


China 


29 

7 

25 


24 
5 
3 


39 
5 
1 


12 

2 

22 


46 

16 

5 


21 
3 


663 

106 

60 


3401 


Africa 


544 


Italy 


661 


Mexico 


43 

48 

5 


8 

10 

6 


9 

11 

6 


12 
18 

1 


7 

14 

6 


■"2"' 

5 


135 

796 
30 


1251 


Brazil 


2903 


Japan 


120 


Total 


157 


56 


71 


65 


94 


31 


1790 


8880 







In 1898 we had a force of foreign and native workers of 193 whose 
labors resulted in 701 baptisms, or a fraction ov:^r three baptisms to 
evt-ry worker. We now have a force of 319 and rejoice in 1,790 bap- 
tisms for the year ending with April 1903, or nearly six bapti^ ms to the 
worker. We do not mak-^ a better average than this in our home work. 

God is greatly blessing this work, and richly l)lessing the churches at 
home that do most for it. The last convention instructed the board to 
work on a basis of $300,000 this year. What part of this amount will 
the Tar River Association conti'ibute? We ought to enlarge our gifts 
T,o this work. The field is white unto the iiarvest. The Master says un- 
to his peofile in the Tar River Associatir.n "go forward." What shall our 
answer be? 

T. J. Taylor. 

Bro. Crudup read the report on Woman's Missionary Society, after 
which Bro. K-sler opened the discussion with one '^f his characteristic 
addresses— tender, throbbing with emotion. He was followed by Breth- 
ren Crudup, Duke and Craig in earnest, burning woids, which stirred 
the souls of God's people. The report was adopted. 

REPORT OF WOMAN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Perhaps the strongest, most constant and most aggressive force foi 
good and against evil in our land is the Christian womanhood. The 
hands and hearts that make our homes and guide the iittle ones through 
the tender and impressible years of childhood will be largely the makers 
of the next g^'neration of Christian workers. The Woman's Work is co- 
day the natural ch-mnel for ihe enlistment into service and development 
of the spiritual gifts of our Baptist womanhood. This department of 
our deoominatirnal work is no longer an experment. Seventeen years 
of patient, self-sacrificing work on the par' of our noble women has 
demonstrated wnat mignty power lies in them when organized for the 
work of Christ. The Woman's Missionary Society is the organization of 
the women in our churches for the eniistmenc and stimulation and direc- 
tion of this mighty power for the work of world wide Missions. 

Wherever the societies have been organized and the work seriously 
and heartily undertaken the results accomplished have been most satis- 
factory and constiture the best commendation of the work. 



14 . MINUTES OF THE 

The contributions of these societies to the Boards of the Southern 
Baptist Convention last year amounted in round numbers to $90,000.00. 
The societies of our own State contributed, last year to the objects of 
the Convention $11,003.13. And the fourteen societies reporting at the 
last session of the Tar River Association reported contributions amount- 
ing- to $693.82. So the cash contribution for the Master's work, made 
by these societies, is a glorious result in itself. 

But undoubtedly a greater accomplishment still of the societies is the 
silent educational work done. By disseminating information about nmis- 
sions. at their meetings, through their public missionary entertainments 
and by distribution of the tracts issued by the Board; and by their con- 
stant activity for one object, the work of Missions beconries more real 
and more comprehensible, not only to themselves, but to the church at 
large and even to those outside the church. Non only so, but this ear- 
nest work of our good women brings hom.e to all of us the great truth 
that the missionary work began by Jesus Christ is still going on, and 
that we all may and should take part in it, both to go, and also to minis- 
ter to those whom He sends to preach His gospel. Their work is a 
stimulus to the whole church and to every department of its work. 

We therefore commend the Woman's Work to all our churches and 
urge our ministers to see that there is a Woman's Missionary Society 
organized in every church. 

JosiAH Crudup. 



MEETING OF WOMEN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETIES. 



The annual meeting of Women's Missionary Societies of the Tar River 
Association convened at Rocky Mount, October 7th, 1903, in the Metho- 
dist Protestant chui-ch, at 3:30, p. m. The meetmg was called to order 
by the vice president, Mrs. Josiah Crudup, of Washington, who read the 
96th Psalm, after which Mrs. Hall, of Lomsburg, led in prayer. 

On behalf of the Rocky Mount society, the delegates were given a cor- 
dial welcome by Miss Parker, of Rocky Mount, in a happily worded ad- 
dress. To this Mrs. Armstrong, of Hobgood, made a becoming response 
for the delegates. An original paper, "Reasons why the women of our 
churches should attend meetings of missionary societies," was read by 
Mrs. Parsons, of Washington. A letter from Dr. Willingham was read 
by Mrs. Cole, of Rocky Mount, and one from Dr. McConnell, by Mrs. 
Davenport, of Washington. 

The roll of societies was called and fourteen societies responded. Mrs. 
Bagley, of Scotland Neck, made a most interesting and instructive talk 
on Sunbeam work. After the reading of receipts, a short address on the 
importance of training the children in missionary work, was made by 
the vice president. 

Mr. Walker, of Henderson, made an earnest and appropriate address, 
after which the meeting was dismissed with prayer. 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 



15 



STATISTICAL TABLE OF WOMAN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 



Name of 
Society. 


Name of 
Secretary. 


c 
_o 

m 

C 
'S 

o 


en 
C 
.2 

■S 

a; 

S 

o 


m 
C 

.2 
CO 

§ 

-t-> 


.2 I 

m 

'5 
o 

CO 

< 


w 

y 

O 

S-i 

o 


15 

O 


m 


0) 
0) 

4-3 

U 

> 


Greenville 


Miss Annie Perkins 


Af, .-^O 


34 40 


19 .30 






$100 00 

54 20 
8 92 


40 




Henderson 


rvTr=; W. S. Rnrnsi-!14 00 


12 50 '27 70 






16 


Hickory. ..! Miss Alma Powell. . 2 27 
Hobgood . . .iMrs. G. L. Merrell. 4 75 
Louisburg;. .iMrs. R. A. Bobbitt. 13 50 
PoplarSp'g Miss Lizzie Whif^e 


2 21 4 44 

7 75 10 50 

71 00S20 50 










26 45 


49 45 8 
105 00! 25 


5 
1^ 


13 12117 .35 






30 47:36 
233 40130 

45 30(18 
13 18114 

31 70i24 




Scotl'dNeck^Miss Huldah .Josey 14.'^ 05 «« 00 


2 35 

7 60 

8 85 
11 50 






T^ 


Washington Mrs. P. S. Parsonsjl7 80 
War'n Pl'ns Miss Mattie Tucker 4 33 


16 40 
8 60 


3 50 




7 
7 


Weldon Mrs. W. E. Daniel. Ill 60 






7 























The above is only a partial account of the Woman's Missionary So- 
ciety's work in the Association. There are several societie- doing good 
wore that have not reported to the Vice-President at all. Hence their 
work does not appear in the table. It is hoped that hereafter all of the 
societies will make complete and regular reports. 

Mrs. Josiah Crudup, V. P. 



REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 



This has been a good year for the cause of temperance. The tide, 
which we trust shall rid the State of the whiskey traffic, is rapidly ris- 
ing 

The moral conscience is aroused as never before, and there is more 
prohibition territory and more counties having the whiskey evil under 
control than at any time in the histoiy of our State. 

The best of our citizenship are determined that this accursed traffic, 
which is subversive of the peace and happiness of our homes, detrimental 
to the progress of our churches, and in fact, against everything that 
makes for the betterment of our people, must go. 

The leaders of the Anti-Saloon movement— men of ability, and aggres- 
sive—have done, and are doing effective work in organizing and put- 
ting to work the moral forces of the State. 

There are many battles yet to be fought -and we urge that no one, 
who loves the Lord, shall fail to buckle on his armor and enter heartily 
in this battle against our common enemy. 

B. K. Mason, Com. 



16 



MINUTES OF THE 



REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

The Finance Committee reported as follows: Your committee report 
that we have received the following amounts: 

For Associational Missions $1,704.58 

For Foreign Missions 102.31 

For Home Missions 5.50 

For State Missions 54.58 

For Education 15.00 

For Orphanage 29.08 

For Aged Ministirs 12.81 

For Minutes , 82.54 

Total $2,006.40 

IVEY Allen, Chairman. 

Bro, N. Biggs, Treasurer of the Executive Committee, and A. G. 
Wilcox, Treasurer of the Association, offered their reports, which were 
audited by Bro. Thomas B. Wilder, who reported. 



REPORT OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 



The Tar River Association 



1903. 

Oct. 1. To cash paid Rev. 



In account with N. Biggs, Treasurer. 

J. E. Hutson $ 10 00 

C. E. Edwards 8 66 

G. W. Coppedge 60 00 

J. T. Ednmndson 50 00 

A. Cre-. 25 00 

A. G. Wilcox 25 00 

J. K. Howell 50 00 

N. L. Gaskint 41 66 

J. A. Garrett 15 00 

H. S. Adkins 10 00 

W. 0. Rosser 25 00 

B. K. Mason 75 00 

B. Craig 100 00 

F. S. Crutchfield 41 65 

Josiah Crudup 200 00 

G. A. Martin 125 00 

R. D. Carroll 100 00 

G. L. Merrell 125 00 

J. E, Hocutt 83 83 

T. J. Crisp 50 00 

G. T. Lumkins 125 00 

J. W. Rose -125 00 



By amount to balance. 



$1,470.30 
...239.85 $1,710.15 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 



17 



1902. 
Oct. 10. By amount fr 



CREDITS. 

om Association 

Greenville church. 
Bethlehem 
Quankie " 
A. G. Wilcox 



, $1,658. 1.'. 

25.0 i 

5.00 

5.'"U 

17. OC $1.7 0.1.5 



By amount due Association S 238. S5 

Examined and approved. 

Thos. B. Wilder, Aur:ir< r. 

Tar River Baptist Association, 

In accoui-'t with A. G. WiLCOX, Trra^urer. 



Oct. 1902. 



receipts 



To balance due A.-?.^ociatioi' at last ses.=;ion 8 o. 

Received Finance Cummi: tee for Foreign ?lIi.-^slon.- 40 

" Home Missitins 28 

" " " State Mi.ssioiiS 29 

" " " Education 35 

" " " Oiphanage. . . - 42 

" " " Aged Ministers 15 

" '• " Sunday Schools 7 

" " '• Church in Martin county 10 

" " " Minute Fund ' 80 

Cash collection for Orphanage IvO 

" " " Roanoke Rapids church deb: 13 

" A.ssociational .Missions 5 

" Aged Ministers 13 



From Greenville f 
" Red Bud 



Quankie 
Bethlehem 



Aurora church . . . . 
or Associational Mis 



Minutes 1 

State Missions 2 

Foreign Missions 1 

Ministers' Relief 1 

Orphanage 2 

Associational Missions 4 

" " 5 



00 
00 
17 
33 
85 



Total $ 531 4"; 



By amount paid Walters Durham for Foreign Missions $ 40 80 

" Home " 28 00 

" State " 20 69 

" " Education 35 98 

" " ' ■ " " Orphanage 42 44 

" " " " " Aged Ministers 15 29 

" " " *' " Sunday Schools 7 00 

" *' " " Cash col. for Aged Ministers 15 06 



18 MINUTES OF THE 

By amt. paid N, Biggs for church in Martin county 10 00 

" '• " " " Greenville Ai^snciational iVIissions 25 00 

" " " " " Roanoke Rapids church debt 13 00 

" " " " " Quankie Associational Missions 4 85 

" " " "Bethlehem " " 5 00 

" " " " Red Bud " " 12 00 

" '■ " " " Cash col. for " " 5 00 

" D. McLeod for Aurora 50 40 

" "A. Johnson cash collection for orphanage 100 00 

" Walters Durham for State M. Red Bud church 2 00 

" Foreign M. " " 100 

" " " " " Aged ministers " 1 17 

" " ■' " " Orphanage '■ " 2 33 

" E. E. Hilliard for minutes 55 00 

" " Stamps, stationery, mailing, manuscript 70 

"- Clerk's fees 25 00 

" " Blanks, church letters, mailing 1 03 

$ 527 74 
To balance due this day 3 73 

Total $ 531 47 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. G. Wilcox, Treasurer. 
Examined and approved, 

Thos. B. Wilder, Auditor. 

Delegates were elected to the Southern Baptist Convention as follows: 
T. M. Arrington ; alternate, N. Biggs. Delegates to the Baptist State 
Convention: R. P. Walker, Josiah Crudup and M. L. Kesler. 

The clerk was ordered to have the usual number of minutes printed 
and receive the usual compensation. 

Adjourned for dinner. 

Thursday, 2:30 p. m. 

The report on Home Missions was offered by Bro. A. T. King, who 
followed the report with an able and instructive address. He was fol- 
lowed by Bro. Howell, after which the report was adopted. 

REPORT OF HOME MISSIONS. 

The Home Mission Board located in Atlanta, Ga., is fortunate in se- 
curing D. B. Gray, who succeeds F. C. McConnell as Corresponding 
Secretary. 

A summary of the work found in the minutes of the Southern Baptist 
Convention shows that theie are 671 missionaries on the field, churches 
aid ssations3, 138, baptisms 8,969, total additions 18,690, churches consti- 
tuted 127, houses of worship built and improved 280, Sunday Schools 
organized 494, Bibles and Testaments distributed 17,903, tracts discribut- 
ed (pages) 3,014.888. 

The receipts from regular sources last year, ending April 30th, were 
$108,691.59, for Building and Loan Fund, $1,460.45; gain over year be- 
fore last, $9,671.75. 

"The faithfulness of the Baptist women of the South in their system- 
atic and organized efforts to aid in the promotion of all missionary en- 
deavor fostered by the Southern Baptist Convention is an inspiration to 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 19 

the Home Board in its important work. The board acknowledges, with 
gratitude to God, the support and encouragement it has derived from 
the loyalty of the offices and societies of the Woman's Missionary Union. " 
From the Woman's Missionary Union this Board received last year $19,- 
295.38. Value of boxes sent to missionaries, $31, 916. 46. 

We are not doing the work that ought to be d')ne. Many worth/ and 
highly hopeful fields are denied help from the Board for the want of 
funds. Every dollar given to this object last year could have been wise- 
ly used in the city of Baltimore. In order to better meet the crying 
need the Convention at Savannah instructed the Board to make still 
greater advance, recommending that Southern Baptists raise not less than 
$200,000 for the Home Board during this year. North Carolina pledged 
$10,000. The entire amount will not be anythmg like enough to send the 
gospel to tlie unsaved of our borders, as there are four states — Mary- 
land, Louisiana, Texas and Missouri — either one of which has enough 
destitution to call for all our efforts. It is the very nature of living 
Christianity to want to spread the news of Salvation. Love to Christ 
and love to man both compel it. May we obey the command of the Mas- 
ter and send the gospel to the unsaved of our large cities; factory fron- 
tiers and mountain districts as well as to the other important fields of 
the Board. 

Nor should we forget the negro. He is here to stay, hence should be 
educated and Christianized. "All over the South the negroes are anxious 
to receive the aid of our Home Mission Board in the prosecution o^^ work 
among their people after the pattern of work done by our Board gener- 
ally, viz: Such aid as will encourage them to do their own work, foster- 
ing such institutions as they may he able to establish, and developing 
such talent as the Lord may raise up among themselves." 

Our Home Board has a large and growing field, but many of our peo- 
ple do not realize the importance of cultivating it. They fail to appre- 
hend that for which the Board was organized, see its great and enlarged 
field, realize its aim of evangelizing the home field as a basis of supply 
for Foreign Missions, to grasp its ever increasing and imperative needs. 

May the God of home, as well -as of world wide Missions, help us all to 
do more this year for the Home Mission Board than ever before. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. T. King. 

The report on Sunday Schools was read by Bro. Kesler for the chair- 
man and, without discussion, was adopted. 

SUNDAY-SCHOOL REPORT. 

To the Tar River Association : 

Every church should have a Sunday-School, for therein lies great pos- 
sibilities of bringing the world speedily to Christ, and everj' effort 
should be made to get each member, old and young, to engage heartily 
in the work. We should elect officers and teachers whose lives are con- 
secrated to the Lord, whose hearts ai'e on fire with love for His cause, 
and will deny themselves of worldly pleasures that bring reproach on the 
cause of Christ, and injure their Christian influence. They should al- 
ways be at their "post of duty," if possible. Only those who are will- 
ing to make the sacrifice should enter into the work, for if they go into 
it in a half-hearted manner, they will make a failure. They should ask 
God's guidance and put their hearts into the work, and never srrow 



20 MINUTES OF THE 

wearv, but labor on, trusting in God, and in such work as this, will be 
fulfilled the scripture which saith: "He that loseth his life for my sake 
shall fi' d it." Most of those who are received into the churches are 
those who have been attending Sunday-schooi, where the "word of God" 
is taught consecutively from Saboath to Sabbath by consecrated men 
and women, therefore, their hearts are more susceptible to the great 
truths of the gospel. Seemg and knowing all these things, how can any 
church afford to be without a Sunday-school ? I suppose wherev?r a 
church is found without one, it is doing very 'ittle toward evangelizing 
the world, and a Missionary Baptist Church, that is only one in name, is 
a misnomer. One of the greatest desires of the writer is to have a 
Sunday-school organized in reach of every boy and girl in this "grand 
old State," and where there are no churches convenient, organize them 
in the public school houses, where possibly we may reach them. My 
prayer is that God will raise up men and women in every section of 
North Carolina, to carry on this grand work. What better occupation 
could one engage in than leading the dear boys and girls to the Savior? 
If we are instrumental in bringmg one of them to Him, and he or she be 
called to a foreign field, we may be mstrumental in saving many of 
those who are now in heathen darkness. Christ said : "Suffer little 
children to come unto me, and forbid them not, for of such is the king- 
dom of heaven." Let us do all in our power to reach them, while they 
are young, and their hearts are tender. 

In looking over the Minutes of the Tar River Association, of 1902, 
your committee finds that there are eleven Sunday-schools that do not 
report a secretary, and one with 127 members that reports neither a 
suoerintendent or secretary. Each church should elect the above named 
officers, and the secret-^ry should order a Sunday-school Record and Roll 
book from the Baptist bookstore, Raleigh, N. C. It costs only 30 cents, 
and if each school will see that this is done, there will be no need of 
such inaccurate reports as have been sent to former Association. In 
this age of enlightenment, the churches ought to see that a man is 
elected to this position, who is competent to keep the record, and let 
each pastor see that a correct report is sent to the Association. Your 
conmittee would also recommend the use of the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention literature, and especially the Bible Class Quarterly for advanced 
scholars, and the "Teacher" for each teacher in the school. He would 
also endorse "Kind Words." Give the children something to read, and 
be sw^e that it is pure and ennobling, for what they read, so will their 
lives be. The purer the literature, the purer the thoughts of the child. 
Some one has said : 

"Sow a thought, reap an act; 
Sow an act, reap a habit; 
Sow a habit, reap a character, 
Sow d character, reap a destiny" 

Your committee would also recommend most heartily "Charity and 
Children," and a monthly collection from each Sunday-school for our 
Orphanage, thereby givi g the children an opportunily to contribute to 
one of the greatest institutions ever estahlished by man, and by giving 
them "Charity and Children," and an opportunity of "giving" to the 
Orphanage. Brethren Boone and Johnson may make room for one 
thousand orphans, and the children will be taken care of. 

Respectfully submitted. 
W, H. Kimball. 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 21 

The next in order was the report on Aged Ministers, and the report 
was read by the Clerk for Bro. Barron, the committeeman. After 
stirring speeches by Brethren Upchurch and Walker, and a cash collec- 
tion of $17.00, the report was adopted. 

REPORT ON AGED BAPTIST MINISTERS RELIEF BOARD. 

To the Tar River Baptisr, Association in session at Rocky Mount, N. C. 

The undersigned begs to report:— The corresponding seci'etary states 
that they have twenty-three beneficiaries on the Board with more ap- 
plications to consider, that the work is increasing with $109.00 less in 
funds on hand than last year. Up to the second week in September, 
we had $574.00, this year at the same time $465.00, which prevents our 
giving as much to each beneficiary as we ought. He asks must this work 
suffer, we give them all you will allow us. 

The pastors have the key to the whole situation. If this charitable 
object was brought earnestly before their churches, the contributions 
would be increased. This work has not been made as prominent as its 
importance demands; from its urgent need, it should appeal to all with 
irresistible force and ought to receive a liberal support. 

St. Paul's charge to the elders at Ephesus appeals to us with equal 
force, "I have showed you all things, how that so laboring ye oughn to 
help the weak," and to renember the words of the Lord Jesus, how he 
himself said, "It is more blessed to give than to receive." 

For the financial work of the Board last year, see the report of the 
treasurer in the minutes of the last Convention at Durham. N. C, as 
for this year, I have no further information than that given above. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

J. S. Barrow. 
Louisburg, N. C, Sept. 22nd, 1903. 

Adjourned with prayer by Bro. A^'alker. 



22 



MINUTES OF THE 

DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS. 



CHURCHES. 





M 






<1> 


01 


x> 


^ 


B 


a 


a 


o 


S 


s 


1902 


1903 



1902 



1903 



Antioch 

Bear Swamp 

Battleboro 

Browns 

Bethlehem 

Bethel 

Cedar Rock 

Cedar Branch 

Castalia 

Concho 

Corinth 

Crocker's Chapel. . . . 

Cypress Chapel 

Conoconara 

Cary's Chapel 

Dawson 

Elm City 

Enfield 

Enterprise 

Elm Grove 

Ephesus 

Eagles 

Everetts 

Fishing Creek 

Greenville 

Gardner's 

Gethsemane 

Halifax 

Hickory 

Hobgood 

Harriss' Chapel 

Hamilton 

Henderson 

John's Chapel 

Littleton 

Louisburg 

Macon 

Macedonia 

Marmaduke 

Maple Springs 

Mt. Hebron 

Mt. Zion 

Middleburg 

Mildred 

North Rocky Mount. 

New Bethel 

New Hope 

Nashville 

North Henderson . . . . 

Oak Level 

Pactolus 

Peach Tree 

Plymouth 

Philadelphia 

Poplar Springs 

Pleasant Grove 

Quankie 

Rock Springs 

Robersonville 

Rosemary 

Red Oak 

Rocky Mount 



56 
162 

67 
140 

56 

40 



153 
58 



54 
110 
199 
52 
39 
45 
191 
150 
147 
53 
35 
131 
149 
49 
32 
34 
62 
21 
181 
68 
242 
404 
168 



130 

9 

46 

110 

209 



70 
160 

60 
145 

64 

41 
192 



136 

90 

32 

193 

20 

93 

43 

51 

129 

90 

63 

103 

111 

114 

25 

26 

58 



87 
28 
172 
17 
107 
52 
51 
126 
84 
66 
136 
131 
101 
23 



67 

125 

156 

58 

6 

86 

41 

108 

51 

142 

64 

113 

211 

60 

57 

46 

207 

146 

164 

57 

35 

149 

151 

39 

34 

85 

63 

22 

192 

67 

194 

385 

154 

65 

125 

9 



118 
247 



!$ 121 981 
: 7 93! 
j 117 65 
i 286 31 
5 00 
I 166 90; 



62 50! 
120 25! 

51 45 
238 77: 

5 50 
118 00 
147 03 
114 48 
197 92 
365 46 
436 68 

9 00 

52 00 
90 .50 

190 25 
92 00 
98 35 
1414 35 
332 66 
157 49 



143 191 
207 081 
296 10 
270 50 



93 21 

378 11 

4902 70 

113 04 1 

57 24, 
67 00 

297 38 1 
66 75, 
139 56 
306 99, 
54 83 i 
737 83 
305 92 

58 50, 
76 25 
22 071 
60 00; 
78 80 1 

135 35 I 
634 48 
193 93 I 
759 95 I 
119 00 



344 40 
413 90 
651 99 
203 80 
2063 661 



40 13 

41 76 
■".16 61 
337 80 

62 31 
150 34 
184 57 



51 49! 
57 31 



127 50 
92 93 

244 05 



7 25 

41 48; 
6 28l 



115 00 
178 44' 

83 02' 
180 46, 
499 13 
143 52 
129 72: 

51 00 
180 20 
163 15! 



134 67 j 
120 72; 

' go'iol 



116 88 
1634 481 
296 47 
141 41 



18 53' 
220 13! 



190 18 1 
221 26 
293 34 
199 48 
2167 76 
145 40' 
361 16, 
4913 75' 
180 34 

68 071 

79 00 
2"^' 50 

88 75 
166 80 
260 00 

54 75 
722 08 
619 64 

74 20 

118 85 
565 45 

119 41 
86 86 

116 21 
458 82 
209 10 
406 47 
488 00 
76 89 
234 05 
527 29 



11 05; 
67 30 

11 83! 

12 OOi 


22 66 i 
27 24! 



313 72 
15 70, 
42 60 

543 38! 
59 411 
8 06 



369 00 



179 60 
2237 19 



81 85 
"i'64 



16 56 



5 50 
3 00 



31 46 
16 56 



293 16 
1 60 

"27 io 



36 19 
16 08 



46 99 
14 18 


" "276 
71 02 


52 19 


"ie'gs 



46 99 

8 

15 75 



19 14 
175 66 



353 48 



110 35 
2420 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION 23 

DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS- (Concluded.) 



CHURCHES. 


a) 
£ 

1902 


£ 
1903 


6 
a 



Q 


Receipts. 


§ Receipts. 

CO 


6 

V 


c 


6 



a) 
Q 


Roanoke Rapids 

Riddick's Grove 


132 
21 


123 

18 

170 




9 
3 


1070 43 
23 47 


468 31 
26 92 
154 35 




3 45 


602 12 


Red Bud 












147 
147 
241 
258 
387 
52 
70 


152 
156 
249 
275 
374 
48 
67 
45 
48 
57 
35 
157 
35 
97 
130 


■"•5 

9 

8 

17 








"is ' 
4 
3 


307 24 
279 70 

122 51 

123 00 
3226 28 

41 68 
292 80 


334 74 
229 05 

163 15 
76 99 

4882 40 
48 41 
368 70 

164 43 
84 32 

419 72 
489 14 
638 07 
11 06 
875 66 
152 78 
983 50 
1324 04 
1300 56 
1541 61 
98 30 
365 00 


27 50 






50 65 


Samaria 

Sandy Creek 

Scotland Neck 

Sulphur Springs 


40 64 

1656 12 
6 73 

55 90 


'ie'oi 








53 
18 
33 
138 
33 
100 
127 




39 
2 
19 
2 

"3" 


5 
"3 " 


48 47 

714 00 

202 77 

481 66 

54 50 

1430 82 
235 58 

1230 60 
859 96 

1071 02 

1071 17 


35 85 

86 '37 
157 41 






294 28 


Tillery 

Tarboro 

Turkey Branch 


" "43 44 
555 16 




82 80 


Wilson 


"465 08 
229 54 
470 44 


247 10 


Washington 

Warrenton 

Weldon 


107 
147 
107 


111 
160 

78 
50 
56 


4 
13 


"29 " 




Vaughns 











Totals 


8,633 


8,707 


482 


251 


33760.06 


37191.74 


5,967.57 


1,625.32 



2 churches, viz : New Sandy Creek and Vaughan were admitted this 
year, making the total number of churches now in the Association 87. 
82 chui'ches reported this year, against 77 last year. 

42 churches report an increase of 482 members. 
26 churches report a decrease of 251 members. 

5 churches report same number of members both years. 
Thus 73 churches show a net gain of 231 members. 

43 churches report an increase of $5,967.57. 
32 churches report a decrease of $1,625.32. 

Thus 75 churches report a net increase of $4,342.25. 

JosiAH Crudup, 
S. V. T. Chamblee, 
Committee. 



24 



MINUTES OF THE 



PLEDGES. 



CHURCHES. 


it 

O W 

o 
o 
to 

< 


C 

o 


. 

c 
o 
'm 

o 
X 


M 

a 
o 

la 


d 

o 

1 
■a 


c 

o! 

o 


m 


1 


"3 

1 


Antioch 

Bethel 


$ 10 25 
12 00 
3 65 
10 00 


$ 2 50$ 


$ 


$ $ 3 52 


$ 


$ 55 

50 


Bethlehem 













50 


Battleboro 


1 00 




1 00 




1 20 


1 25 




6 75 
25 00 

5 60 
12 50 
15 55 


2 90 






90 














1 69 

60 

1 00 

1 75 






































































20 66 

5 00 

5 00 

25 00 

10 00 

25 00 

10 00 

5 00 

20 00 

10 00 

25 00 

15 00 
























1 00 








40 

50 

1 25 

1 00 

50 

25 

1 00 

1 00 

1 35 

50 

1 10 





































2 50 








2 50 












































Elm City 
































Enfield 


4 65 













. 




1 00 






2 00 


1 55 















15 00 
25 00 
20 00 
25 00 








2 50 
5 00 






65 
1 25 

1 00 

2 00 














































, 


Hahtax 


















15 00 
15 00 
20 00 
15 00 
50 13 

5 00 

25 00 

125 00 

12 00 

5 55 

5 00 
35 00 
15 00 
10 00 

5 00 
15 00 

7 35 
25 50 
10 00 














1 00 • • ■ • 








2 00 








1 50' 














1 00' 
















1 00 

































60 

1 00 

2 00 
1 50 

65 

75 

1 50 




L.ttleton 








































2 00 
















1 81 


1 81 






































3 50 








1 00 




Mildred 














Mt. Hebron 














1 00 




Mt Zion 


1 00 








1 00 




1 00 
50 

1 00 
50 








■ 






New Bethel 


68 14 




3 50 




5 00 
























25 00 
8 00 

10 00 

11 00 
15 00 
10 00 
30 00 
50 00 






27 00 






3 25 


i 66 

1 00 
1 00 
1 50 




Oak Level 

















1 00 


















1 75 
















1 50 













5 00 




1 CO 


















3 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


3 00 










15 00 
25 00 














i 66 

1 50 




Red Oak 
















Red Bud 

















Riddick's Grove 3 26 




















Roanoke Rapids 17 25 















1 00 





TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION 



2l 



PLED jES. - (Continued. ) 










CHURCHES. 


CO c 

.2" .2 
« d CM 

o ^ S^ 

< . (2 

5 00^ 


Home 

Missions. 

State 

Missions. 


Education. 


c 

& 

O 


M 

U 


3 
c 

i 


t 

^ 


Robersonville 


1 









% 50 
5 00 
1 00 




Rockv Mount 


60 00 


I 












10 00 






























23 00 












2 00 

1 50 

2 50 
1 00 
1 50 




Samaria 


12 501 

200 00: 


2 00 


1 08 







1 00 






10 00' 








5 00 


1 00 






20 00 





























5 00 












50 

50 

1 50 

65 

25 

50 

1 00 

1 25 

1 25 

2 00 
2 00 
2 00 




Staahop? 

StoTv Creek 


10 00 

25 00 5 00 
5 00 





is 00 




2 00 




"i'56 






2 00 50 
15 00 


50 


50 


50 


50 


50 




Tillerv 






30 00 
















35 00 ... 






2 00 










15 00 












Warrsnton. 


50 00 














50 00 














W^l ion 


50 00 9 87 
\\ 80 















Wilsm 
















1 30 












75 




Vaug-hns 

















Total 


1704 58 102 31 5 50 54 58 15 00 29 OS 12 81 82 54 



INDIVIDUAL PLEDGES. 



Poplar Spring, Sunday School and Colportage % 2 14 

Woman's Missionary Society, Wilson, Associational Missions 5 50 

F. ']. Ferguson, Associational Missions 20 00 

Mrs. F C. Ferguson " " 10 00 

G. M. Du e ^ " " 5 00 

W. H. Abernathy " " 2 00 

T. J. Crisp " " ^00 

G. W. May " " 5 00 

J. E. Hocutt " " 2 50 

W. H. White " " 5 00 

A. G. Willcox " " 5 00 

Mrs. P. S. Parsons " " 5 00 

Tola $69. 14 



26 



MINUTES OF THE 



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TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 



27 



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28 



MINUTES OF THE 




TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 



29 



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MINUTES OF THE 33 

RULES OF DECORUM. 



Believing it best to be governed by certain rules and regulations in 
conducting the business of this Association, we adopt the following: 

1. The Association shall be opened and closed with pra^-er. 

2. Not more than one person shall speak at a time, who shall rise 
from his seat and address the Moderator. 

3. The person thus speaking shall not be interrupted, unless he vio- 
lates some rule of decorum. 

4. The pei'son speaking shall adhere strictly to the subject, and in no 
wise, veflect on any other brother. 

5. No :brother shall absent himself from the Association without ob- 
taining permission from the body. 

Eu 6. No brother shall speak more than twice on the same subject with- 
out unanimous consent. 

7. No person shall whisper while a brother is speaking. 

8. The names of the deh gates shall be enrolled by the Clerk, and 
called as often as the Association requires. 

9. The Moderator may give his ideas on any subject before putting it 
to the vote, but is entitled to vote only in case of a tie. 

10. An order of business shall be made at the beginning of each ses- 
sion, and shall be changed only by vote of the body. 



CONSTITUTION. 



1. The Association shall be composed of the pastors and of the mem- 
bers chosen by the churches who shall produce letters certifying their 
app'^intment. Members thus chosen and convened, together with the 
pastors, shall be denominated The Tar River Baptist Association, 
which shall have no power over the churches, nor shall it infringe on any 
of their rights. 

2. The letters from the churches shall contain the number then in 
fellowship and of those baptized, received by letter, dismissed, excluded 
and died since last Association. 

3. The officers of the Association shall be a Moderator, Clerk, Treas- 
urer and Historian, who shall be chosen by the suffrages of the members 
present. 

4. Other churches, upon petition by letter and by delegates, and af- 
ter a satisfactory examination of their Articles of Faith, may be admit- 
ted to the body by a unanimous vote, when the Moderator shall give to 
their delegates the right hand of fellowship. 



34 TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 

5. Every church in this Association is entitled to one representative, 
but no church more than three. 

6. Every motion made and seconded shall be left to the discretion of 
the Association whether ir may be debated or not. 

7. The Association shall endeavor to furnish the churches with copies 
of its minutes. 

8. The minutes of the Association shall be read and approved, and 
shall be signed by the Moderator and Clerk before the Association ad- 
journs. 

9. Any church not representing itself in this body for three succes- 
sive sessions, by letter or delegates, shall be stricken from the roll of 
churches, unless satisfactory reasons are assigned. 

10. The Association shall withdraw fellowship from any church which 
shall be found disorderly in faith or practice. 

11. Visiting brothers from sister churches, or similar bodies, may be 
invited to participate in our deliberations. 

12. At each session of the Association delegates to the Baptist State 
Convention and to the Southern Baptist Convention shall be chosen by 
Vote. 

13. This Constitution is subject to alteration by a majority vote of 
the delegates enrolled at any session. 

14. The business of the Association shall be conducted according to 
Mell's Parlimentary Practice. 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



SEVENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 



OF THE 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION 

HELD WITH THE CHURCH AT 

MAPLE SPRINGS, FRANKLIN COUNTY, 
OCTOBER 4, 5, 6, 1904 

THE NEXT SESSION TO BE HELD WITH THE 
CHURCH AT TARBORO, ON TUESDAY 
AFTER FIRST SUNDAY IN OC- 
TOBER, 1905, AT 11 A. M. 

TO PREACH INTRODUCTORY SERMON: 

REV. G. T. LUMPKIN. 

ALTERNATE: - THOMAS J. JENKINS. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE : 

N. BIGGS, T. M. ARRINGTON, E. W. SHEARIN, 

O. L. PITTMAN. R. M. JOHNSON, THOS. B. WILDER. 



Minutes 

of the 

Seventy- Fourth Annual Session 

of the 

Tar River Association 



Held With the Church at Maple Springs, 
Franklin County, 

October 4, 5 and 6, 1904. 

The next Session to be Held with the Church 
at Tarboro, Edgecombe County, beginning 
on Tuesday, after the First Sunday 
in October, 1905, at 11 O'clock. 



To Preach Introductory Sermon, G. T. Lumpkins, 
Alternate, J. T. Jenkins. 



Officers: 
T. M. Arrington, Moderator, Rocky Mount, N. C. 
A. G.Wilcox, Clerk and Treas., Spring Hope. N.C. 



1904 
Rocky Mount Publishing Co.'s Print, 



2 MINUTES OF THE 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

To write on Aged Ministers J, D. Larkln. 

To write on Orphanage B. Craig. 

To write on Associational Missions J. D. Hufham. 

To write on State Missions H. M. Mashburn 

To write on Home Missions , G. T. Lumpkin. 

To write on Foreign Missions T. J. Taylor. 

To write on Sunday Schools J. T. Jenkins. 

To write on Education S. L. Morgan. 

To write on Temperance G. M. Duke. 

To write on Woman's Work Josiah Crudup. 

To write on Periodicals T. S. Crutchfield. 



PASTORS AND POST OFFICES. 



CRISP, T. J., Conetoe. 

ANDREWS, E. C, Durham. 

CARROLL, R. D., Williamston. 

COPPEDGE, G. W., Wakefield. 

CRAIG, B., RxxJky Mount. 

CREE, A., Embro. 

CRUTCHFIELD, T. S Roanoke Rapids. 

CRUDUP, JOSIAH, Washington. 

CULLQM, W. R., Wake Forest. 

DAVIS, M. P. Tarboro. 

DUKE, G. M., Mapleville. 

DUNN. BEN., Wise. 

DOWNEY, J. W., Henderson. 

EDMUNDSON. J. T., Raleigh. 

GASKINS, N. L., Enfield. 

HOCUTT, J. E. Bethel. 

HOWELL, .L K., Rocky Mount. 

HOLMES, G. W., EiDSom. 

JENKINS, T. J Wilson. 

KING, A. T., Greenville. 

LARKIN. J. D., Henderson. 

LEGGETT, B., ., Windsor. 

LOFTIN. I. N., *. . ..Henderson. 

LUMPKIN, G. T. Scotland Neck. 

MAY, G. W., . . Red Oak. 

MORGAN, J. W Weldon. 

MORGAN. S. L., Littleton. 

MASHBURN. H. H ..Littleton. 

MARSH. R. N., Oxford. 

MERRELL, G. L., Rocky Mount. 

NOWELL. W. C NaiShville. 

STRADLEY. .L A., Oxford. 

SLEDGE, J. W., Cedar Rock. 

TAYLOR. T. J Warrenton. 

UPCHURCH, C. A., Gary. 

WILLIAMS, C. C Royal. 

WILCOX, A. G., Spring Hope. 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 



PROCEEDINGS. 

Maple Spring, EYanklin Ck)., Oct. 4, 1904. 

The Tar River Association, met with the church nere today in its 
seventy-fourth annual session. The moderator called the body to 
order, and Brother Hufham led in prayer. Brother Baylus Cade 
read the 12th capter ot Romans, after which Brother T. J. Taylor 
preached the introductory sermon from 1 Chronicles, 29th chapter 
and 5th verse. "Who then is willing tO' consecrate nis service this 
day unto the Lxjrd?" 

At the close of the sermon the moderator appointed a finance 
committee consisting of Brethren Ivey Allen, J. C. Heal and C. F. 
Ellen. 

The roll of churches was called, tlie names- of delegates enrolled 
as follows: 

Antioch — John Parker, W. J. Collier. 

Battleboro — T. D. Wright. 

Bethlehem — Jesse Carter. I. E. Pepper. 

Bethel— J. E. Hocutt. 

Bear Swamp— Bat. Crawley, Watson Bowers. 

BrovN^n's— J. W. Smithwick, Willis Allen, John Allen. 

Castalia — R. H. Burns, S. J. Bartholomew, J. S. Batchelor. 

Carys Chapel— C. E. Hoyle, E. G. Adcock. 

Cedar Rock — S. J. Matthews, J. B. Fulghum, J. E. Poythress. 

Conoho — T. J. Crisp. 

Cedar Branch — By Letter. 

Corinth— J. L. Jackson, C. B. Ellington, H. G. Sherman. 

Conoconary— W. E. Barkley. 

Cypress Chapel— H. W. Wilder, W. F. Gay, Emmett Stallings. 

Dawson's- L. E. D'Berry, O. P. Stallings. 

Eagles — By Letter. 

Elm Grove — 

Enterprise— W. W. Bobbitt, Hardy Bobbitt 

Enfield — W. L. GasKins. 

Elm City— W. D. Carter. : 

Ephesus— L. M. Edwards, W. P. Lamb, S. S. Hendrlck. 

Everett's — J. A. Whitley. ■ 

Fishing Creek— J. C. Sledge, W. T. Shearin. 

Green-^nlle — By Letter. 

Gethsemane — O. L. Pittman, R. Maxks. 

Gardner's^ — W. H. Wright. 

Hamilton — ' 

Harriss Chapel— W. H. Mabry, S. W. Hamlet, J, T. Parker. 

Halifax — N. L. Gaskins. 

Henderson — T. P. Stewart. 
. Hobgood — A. C. Davis F. A. Ruffin. 

Hickory — W. &'. Dozier, F. W. Dozier. 

John's Chapel — By Letter. 

Littleton — S. L. Morgan. 

Louisburg — Ivey Allen, Thomas Wilder. 

Maple Springs— J. W. Strange. W. H. Stallings, J. H. Wester. 

Macon — T. M. Allen J. M. Colman. 



4 MINUTES OF THE 

Crocker's Chapel — C. G. Ros.6. ■ : i i 

Macedonia — J. C. Taylor. B. F. Edwards. ! 

Marmaduke — Stephen Duke, F. M. Duke, W. D. Gooch. 

Middleburg— W. H. Kimball, S. G. Chanipion, W. E. Wilson. 

Mildred— T. J. Crisa ; 

Mt. Hebron — E. C. Denton. 

Mt. Zion — W. T. Cooper, M. L. Grifton, W. E. Kenneday. 

Nashville^ — Leon T. Vaughn, B. G. Alford. 

New Bethel- G. W. Holmes, S. M. Hicks, G. T. Askew. 

New Hope — T. J. Crisp. 

New Sandy Creek — Thomas West, E. C. Andrews. 

West Rocky Mount — G. L. Merrell. 

West Henderson— B. F. Ellington, W. T. Gupton, S. G. Walters. 

Oak Level — T. J. Crisp. 

Pactolus — J. E. Hocutt. 

Peach Tree — .J. H. Hollingsworth, H. A. Hlnes, &'. C Edwards. 

Poplar Springs — J. H. Cheares, J. R. Wright. 

Pleasant Grove — W. A. Baines. 

Plymouth — By Letter 

Philadelphia— A. C. Griffin, G. V. Frazler, Q. Hedgepeth. 

Quankee — ; 

Ro€ky Mount — E. W. Shearin. T. M. Arrington. 

Reedy Creek — IS. H. Neal, Thomas Harriss, Rom. Neal. 

Riddick's Grove — I 

Red Oak— J. C. Beal, G. W. May. 

Roanoke Rapids — T. S. Crutchfield. j 

Rock Spring — J. L. Cheaves, J. M. Nowell, J. B. Strickland. 

Robersonville — By Letter. i 

Rosemary — J. B. Ferrell. > ! 

Sandy Creek— J. J. Foster. - * j 

Samaria — D. S. Cone. 

Scotland Neck— J. W. House, R. W. Johnson, B. F. Gray. 

S'haron — I. N. Loftin 1 

Stanhope— S. R. Pierce, C. C. Pierce. 

Stony Creek— C. F. Ellen, Charlie High. 

Social Plains — H. B Hagwood, G. O. Alford. 

South Henderson— B. B. Collins, J. N. Loftin. i 

Spring Hope — W. B. Wheeless. ' 

Sulphur Springs— D. P. Askew, T. H. Aycock. ' ' 

Tarboro — M. L. Harriss, M. P. Davis. . , ! 

Tillery — .T. K. Howell. 

Turkey Branch — A. E. Hull. ' 

Vaughan's— .T. J. Marshall, B. O. Rlggan. '■"■ ' 

Warrenton— T. J. Taylor. 

Warren Plains — G. R. Frazler. ' \ ' 

Washington — Josiah Crudup. 

Weldon — J. W. Morgan, J. L. Harriss. 

Wilmingtouh— S. A. Newell. 

Wilson— L. A. Drake, Z. T. Broughton, L. Moya 

Having completed the roll of churches, the Association wag per- 
manently organized by the re-election of Brother T. M. Arrington 
as moderator, A. G. Wilcox, clerk and treasurer, and G. M. Duke 
historian. 

The following committes were appointed: 

On order of busines3, B. Craig. J. W. Morgan and J. A. Coppedge. 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 5 

On religious exercises G. M. Duke and deacons of Maple Springs 
church. 

Brother G. M. Duke, the pastor of Maple Springs church, delivered 
an address of welcome, which was responded to by Brother G. f. 
Lumpkin, 

The moderator extended an invitation to visiting brethren to par- 
ticipate in the business of the meeting, and brethren B. Cade, N. L. 
S'haw, J. W. Bailey and W. C. Tj^ee present/ed themselves and were 
cordially received by the moderator. 

New pastors who had come into the Association since the last 
meeting were requested to address the body^ whereupon S. L. Mor- 
gan, I. N. Loftin, M. P. Davis, J. W. Downey responced with bri'^f 
addresses. 

Adjourned for dinner with benediction by Brother Howell. 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 

Association called to order and led in prayed by Brother Davis. 

Committee on order of business made a partial report as follows: 
2:30, Periodicals; 3:15, Orphanage. 

The hour for special order having arrived and the report on 
Periodicals not being ready, on motion of Brother Hufham, the 
order of business was suspended, and the report on th* Orphanage 
read by Brother B. Craig as follows: 

REPORT ON ORPHANAGE. 

Nineteen years ago next November, the first orphan was receiv- 
ed at our Orphanage. During this time more than eight hundred 
orphans have been received. More than five hundred have gone cut, 
and about two hundred and eighty are being cared for now. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The Orphanage has eight doriciitories and the ninth is bein built. 
Besides these we have a printing office, infirmary, central building 
(school building and chapel). Mills Memorial building, a home for 
the General Manager and a home for the Treasurer, who is also 
Superintendent of the farm. The farm contains about three hun- 
dred and fifty acres of land, with the usual farm buildings, stock and 
machinery. Since the last report the well has been completed, 
and there is an abundance of water. 

ITS' NEEDS. 

The first thing the Orphanage undertakes to do is to furnish as 
nearly as possible, a home for the child, to give him warm clothes 
and good food, and to convince him that he is not alone in the 
world. 

The Orphanage undertakes to prepare the child for the duties 
of life. The school advantages are especially fine. The farm, ma- 
chine shop and shoe shop and printing office, furnish employment 
for the boys and teach them to work at profitable trades. The girls 
are taught how to sew and keep house, and any girl after having 
finished the course of study at the Orphanage can get a first grade 
certificate to teach school. 

The Sunday school and church advantages are not surpassed In 
the state. 



6 MINUTES OF THE 

ITS WORK. 

The Orphanage needs more buildings, and a complete sewerage 
system, all of which calls for larger contribution. Just now the 
Orphanage is afflicted with fever. Forty cases have been reported, 
and. the disease is not abated. Two deaths were reported last 
week. This will greatly increase the expenses. Therefore we earnestly 
advise that all of our churches and Sunday schools take collec- 
tion immediately to relieve the great strain just at this time. We 
recommend that all of our Sunday schools take monthly collections, 
and have some definite amount fixed to raise. That our Surulay 
schools take Charity and Children, which can be had for CO cents a 
copy in clubs of ten or more. The paper is well worth the money. 
It is one of the brighest papers in the state. We further recommen"! 
that all our churches take one collection a year for the Orphanage. 
Twenty-six churches failed to contribute last year. Your commit- 
tee earnestly request that there be no blanks in Orphanage columu 
next year. BRAXTON CRAIG. 

He followed his report with an inspiring address, and took a col- 
lection for the Orphanage amounting to ?101.73. 



REPORT ON PERIODICALS. 

"The pen is mightier than the sword." The literature of a peo- 
ple has been called the dial of their progress. The printing pres3 
constitutes one factor of a quartette of forces, which forms the 
foundation of the progress and hope of modern civilization, viz., 
the pulpit, the platform, the school, and last, but not least, the 
printing press. Reading is the greatest source of information. Peo- 
ple will read something. Never 'in any age of the world has there 
been as great demand for books and periodicals as now. There i? 
a thirst for knowledge, such as the world never saw. Let us a3 
Christians be quick to seize this mighty force, the printing press, 
and make it an engine of power for good, rather than an instru- 
ment for evil and a tremendous source of wickedness, which, in 
many instances it is already. Especially let us as Baptists utilize 
this opportunity for the glory of God and the advancement of our 
denomination. A denominational paper may be said to meet a 
fourfold need: 

1. It is a source of good literature, and as such it is inidispensible 
to meet the demands of our homes for good, wholesome reading 
and general denominational culture. 

2. It is a medium of information, giving an account of what our 
great denomination is doing in every part of our beloved state, and 
keeping us in close touch with the onward march of our people 
in their work of evangelization, education, and missionary and 
general spiritual growth and advancement. 

3. It is a method of promoting denominational unity. No agency 
is so necessary and so indispensible and potent to the unity of our 
work as our denominational papers. 

4. It is an organ of education. We must be abreast of the times 
in thought and general culture. Our people should be taught to 
look to our periodicals as the chief source, standing side by side 
with the pulpit, of advanced thought and progress. 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 7 

Therefore, we call attention first of all, to the Biblical Recorder, 
the organ of our convention in this State. We take great pleasure 
in the groiwth of the paper during the past few years. The en- 
largement and general improvement speak well for the people 
whom it serves. It is not without significance that our paper has 
a large circulation. We desire that the subscription list be en- 
larged until 15,000 copies of the paper shall be required weoklv 
tiO supply the demand; and that the paper shall always represent 
us. What would we be without a paper? Having such a paper, we 
desire that it shall be supported in a manner that v/ill always make • 
It represent us worthily; to carry to other Baptists an impression 
worthy of us, and to proclaim to the world what we are, what we 
propose to do and what we would be. TO' this end every pastor 
and delegate in this '.'Ody is urged to stand by our organ, to seek 
for it a larger support, and to unite with the editor in high en- 
deavor to improve it continually. 

We commend also the North Carolina Baptist, a paper sound, 
loyal and a helpful factor in our denominational work. For temper- 
ance and against the liquor trafiic, it has been specially aggressive, 
and its work is bearing fruit in a rapidly growing public sentiment 
against the evil. 

We would also further commend most heartily tO' the churches 
composing this Association Charity and Children, a most excellent 
paper and the organ of our Orphanage. A purer and cleaner and 
more high-toned paper does not come from the press of North 
Carolina. 

We most earnestly urge our pastors to^ induce their people to 
take the Foreign Mission Journal, published at Richmond, Va., 35 
cents a year, single copy; 25 cents in clubs of ten. Our peoiple need 
information about Foreign Missions and the Journal is the best 
source of such information, to v/hich we have access at this time. 

We recommend the Sunday schooi literature, published by the 
Sunday School Board of the Southern Baptist Convention at Nash- 
ville, Tenn. To use this literature is to satisfy our own forces and 
patronize our own people. "In union there is strengia." 

R. D. CAEHOLL. 

Report on Periodicals- was read by Bro. S. A. Newell and Bro. 
J. W. Bailey, editor R,ecorder, addressed the Association. Brief re- 
marks were also made by Brethren Hufham, Shaw, Lumpkin, Mar- 
shall, Howell, and the report was adopted. 

Tlie Committee on New Churches, was appointed as follows; 
H. H. Marshburn, W. H. Kimball, A. C. Griffin and Brother T. B. 
Wilder was appointed Auditor, and the Association adjourned with 
prayer by Bro. W. C. Tyree. 

Wednesday Morning, 

9:30 a. m. 

The Association was led In religious exercises by Bro. G. T. 
Lumpkin . 

The Minutes of yesterday were read and afte^ coTrection were 
adopted. 

Bro. Arch Johnson, representing Charity and Chilclren and the 
Orphanage, was present a.nd recognized by the ]\Todera.tor. Also 
Bro. J. T. Jenkins, the new pastor of the church at Wilson. 



8 MINUTES OF THE 

The Committee on Time, Place and Preacher for the next Asso- 
ciation, was appointed, consisting of G. L. Merrell, R.. M. Johnson 
and Z. T. Broughton. 

Committee on Digest of Church Letters, consisting of Josiab 
Crudup, B. Craig and S. L. Morgan, was appointed. 

Special order having arrived for State Missions, the report was 
read by Bro. J. W. Morgan, which, after discussion by Bro. Morgan 
and Bro. Grudup, was adopted. 



REPORT OF STATE MISSIONS. 

The writer of this report, coming tO' Nortii Carolina from another 
section of the country, is inclined to commend the Baptists here 
for the zeal with which they are prosecuting the work of evan- 
gelizing their own State. Last year, at the call of thieiir Secretary, 
we saw them go forward to $25,000, and this year we expect the 
$30,000 mark to be reached. When however, we consider the con- 
ditions that confront us we not only understand the ca.use for this 
effort, but we see abundant reasons why we should put forth for 
greater exertions along this line than we ever yet have done. 
Among these reasons may be mentioned, (1) the rapid material 
progress which our State is making, and with which we must keep 
pace;- (2) the influx, consequent upon our growing prosperity, of a 
foreign element, ever increasing in numbers and depravity; and 
(3) the ceaseless vigilance and tireless energy of strongly intrench- 
ed, and highly organized religious denominations- with which we 
are engaged in a holy rivalry for possession of the Master's vine- 
yard. These, and other reasons that might be given, should stimu- 
late us to enlarge our work in order that we may take advantage 
of the opportunities so rapidly being presented. Many doors are 
opening to us, but if we do not enter them at once, others will. 

Especially should the Tar River Association heed this call. From 
the time the Board was organized it has been doing work in this 
Association. At present more money is spent by the Boaxd in 
this Association than in any other in the State, and next year larger 
appropriat.ions will be asked for than ever before. Last year 
we gave but $600 to the State work, while the Board spent more 
than twice this amount within the borders of our Association. That 
the Board may be enabled to meet the increasing demands that 
are being made upon it, not only in our own Association, but in the 
State at large, we recommend, (1) that the stronger churches in 
our Association as rapidly as possible become independent of the 
Board; (2) that all our churches during the coming year increase 
their contributions to State Missions; and (3) that this increase be 
secured by adopting the New Testament rules for systematic giv- 
ing, 1 Cor. 16:1, 2. 

Associational Mission being the next order of business, the re- 
port was read by Bro. J. D. Hufham for Bro. G. M. Duke. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONS. 

After twenty-six years of labor in this great mission field it may 
be worth while to look backward and see what God hath wrought. 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 9 

At the time that the Association took up the burden there were 
thirty-two churches. In these cliurches there were 2,900 members. 
Now there are ninety-two churches and about 9,000 members. At 
that time there was no church on the line of railroad between Wil- 
son and Weldon. Now there are five. In Edg^ecombe there v/as 
only one church, and that was ready to die. Now there are five, 
.each of them as strong numerically as that first church was. Along 
the Roanoke there was only one self-sustaining church from. Wel- 
don to Plymouth. Now there are seven churches. In Pitt county 
there was but one church. Now there are six; some of them very 
strong. In Martin and Beaufort counties and in the: upper part of 
Halifax county the record runs in the same way. To hear of these 
things is like reading a chapter from the Acts of the Apostles. 

This work, great in its scope and grand in its results, was sus- 
tained mainly by prayers and offerings of the older churches in the 
upper part of the Association. The blessing of the Lord has rested 
in rich measure on these noble givers and workers. They have 
been blessed not only in their own souls, but also in their church 
work at home. They have grown in numbers and liberality, in gen- 
eral efhciency and constantly enlarging influence. 

During the year just closed the work has gone steadily forward 
and the favor of the Lord has rested on His consecrated and 
faithful laborers. Brother Crutchfield in addition to his pastorate 
at Roanoke Rapids has been preaching" at Rosemary, the site of a 
large mill for the manufacture of silk where there is a Mission 
church. An excellent meeting has just been held and several have 
been added to the church. Bro. Morgan has recently established a 
promising mission a few miles out of Weldon. Bro. Gaskins has 
labored faithfully at Enfield, Halifax, Turkey Branch and Alsop's 
Chapel. On parts of this field the prospects are encouraging in a 
high degree. Bro. Edmondson has been preaching at Vaughan's and 
Harris' Chapel, but we are without particular information as lo 
results. 

Bro. Craig has labored at some podnts around Rocky Mount and 
has baptize:d one. Bro. Wilcox has also bestowed very faithful 
labor at several points in Nash county. The sa,me may be said of 
Bro. Coppedge. Bro. Merrill has built two houses of worship in 
Edgecombe and they are paid for. Bro. T. J. Crisp has a house of 
worship well under way at an important point in Martin county. 
The few brethren at that place have made many sacrifices and they 
are entitled to aid from the-ir brethren in more favored localities'. 

Bro. Henderson has been preaching at Gethsemane and Spring 
Hill Five have been baptized at the latter place. Bro-. Loftin has 
been serving as missionary pastor of the church at the cotton mill 
in South Henderson, and Bro. Downey at the mill in North Hender- 
son. At both places there have been signal displays of God's 
pov/er to save. Besides these Bro. Davis has been laboring at Tar- 
boro, Bro. J. K. Howell at Robersonville, Biro. Hocuit at four impor- 
tant places in Martin co.unity,Bro. Crndup at Washington and Au- 
rora, and Bro. Carroll at a mission near Williamston. From this field 
five new churches have been admitted into your body at this ses- 
sion. 

We have hastily reviewed the year's work and the quarter of a 

century before that. Through all those years we have made 

•steady and gratifying progress. We have now reached a point 

at which we must enlarge our operations or suffer loss. This 



10 MINUTES OF THK 

means that the contributions must be increased. Gkwl Sieems to be 
(Sailing us urgently to go fordward. Let us heed the call. 

G. M. DUKE, 
Chairman. 

After discussioTi by Bro. Hufham, Bro. Duke and Bro. Craig, a 
roll of the churches was called and pledges takes for the next As- 
sociational vear as follows: 

&;co.tIand Neck, $300.00; Louisburg, $125.00; Rocky Mount, 
$100.00; Henderson, $100.00; Wilson $100,00; North Rocky Mount, 
170.00; Greenville, $60,00; Weldon,' $60.00; Washington, $50,00; 
Warrenton, $50.00; Poplar Springs, $50.00; Roanoke Rapids, $37.50; 
Stony Creek, $35.00; Tarboro, $35.00; Philadelphia, $35.00; Browns, 
$30.00; New Bethel, $30.00; Dawsons, $30.00; Maple Springs, $30.00; 
Cedar Rock, $25.00; Littleton, $25.00; Sharon,' $25.00; Cypress 
Chapel, $20.00; Elm City, $20.00; Gardner's, $20.00; Sandy Creek. 
$20.00; Warren Plains, $20.00; Mt. Zion $18.00; Battleboro, $15.00; 
Gethsemane, $15.00; New Hope, $15.00; Red Bud, $15.00; Spring. 
Hope, $15.00; Macon, $15.00; Peach Tree, $12.50; Castalia, $10.00; 
:5]agles, $10.00; Ephesus, $10.00; Mildred, $10.00; North Henderson, 
$10.00; Pactolus, $10.00; Plymouth, $10.00; Stanhope, $10.00; Bben- 
ej^er.. $10.00; L. M. S. Wilson, $10.00; Corinth, $25.00; Enfield, 
$25.00; Hobgood, $25.00; Red Oak. $25.00; Williamsfton, $25.00; 
Conoconary, $20.00; Fishing Creek, $20.00; Nasihville, $20,000; Til- 
lery, $20.00; Hickory, $18.00, Middleburg, $17.50; Bear Swamp, 
$15.00; Hamilton, $15.00; Reedy Creek, $15.00; felamairia, $15.00; 
Harris' Chapel, $15.00; Bethel, $12.50; Rosemary, $12.50; Gary 
Chapel, $10.00; Enterprise, $10.00; Everetts $10.00 Mit. Hebron, 
$10.00; Oak Level, $10.00; Pleasant Grove, $10.00; Rock Springs, 
$12.00; Vaughan's, $10.00; Joyner's Chapel, $10.00; Mecedonia, 
$8.00; Marmaduke, $7.00; Sulphur Springs, $7.00; Conoho, $6.00; 
Robersonville, $5.00; Mountain Grove, $5.00; A. C. Griffin, $5.00; 
G. W. Sledge, $5.00; W. C. Cullom, $5.00; Mt. Zion, M. S., $5.00; 
Hobgood, M. S., $5.00; Crocker's Chapel, $2.50; G. C. Hedgepeth, 
$2.50; Mrs. Mary Champion, $1.00; South Henderson, $12.00; Tur- 
key Branch, $6.00; Bethlehem, $5.00; Social Plains, $5.00; Aurora, 
$5.00; Mrs. Annie Armstrong, $5.00; Ladies' M- S- Sandy Creek, 
$5.00; Maple Springs, M. S., $5.00; Poplar Springs, M. S., $5.00; Mid- 
way, $4.00; Halifax, $2.00; New Sandy Creek, $2.00; Mrs. John 
Uz-?le, $2.00; Mrs. Bessie Strange, $1.00 — making a total of $2, 
288.50— after which the report was adopted. 

Committee on New Churches made their report recommend- 
ing the following vjhurches: Ebenezer, Midway, Joyner's Chapel, 
Mountain Grove and Aurora be received as members of the Tar 
River Association which report was received and adopted, and the 
Moderator gave the right hand of fellowship to the delegates. . 
ON ORDER OF BUSINESS. 

The committee on order of business made their final report as 
follows : 

Wednesday, 2 p. m. — Foreign Missions; 3.15 Home Misisiions; 
4, Miscellaneous Business. 

Thursday, 9.30 a. m. — Prayer and praise; 10, a. m., Woman's 
Work; 10.30,. Education; 11, Sunday Schools; 11.45, Historian's 
Report; 12,, Temperance; 12.30, Aged Ministers; 1 p. m.. Miscella- 
neous Business; which report was adopted. 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION, U. 

Adjourned for dinner, benediction by Brother Duke, 

Wednesday, 2 p. m. 
Association convened and was led in prayer by Brotlier Merrill, 
Special order for Foreign Missions having arrived, the report was 
read by Brother T, J. Taylor. 



REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

Jesus Christ came into the world to save th© world. The spirit 
of Christ means world-wide evangelization. When Jesus finished 
hia work he comnian<led his; disciples,, "Go teach alT nations, bap- 
tizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son and of the 
Holy Spirit." In obedien'oe to this command, and in accordance 
with the spirit of the commission we hereby resolve to go forward 
in the great work of carrying the gospel that saves to all nations, 

T. J. TAYLOR, 

This was followed by a very learned address by Brother W. G. 
Tyree, the Vice-President of the Foreign Mission Board for North 
Carolina, after which the report was adopted. 

Home Missions was taken up and Brother J. K. Howell read the 
report, after which discussion was had by Brother Howell and 
Brother B. Cade and adopted. 



.REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

The Home Mission Board does work in all the Southern fe'tat&s 
and territories and in Cuba. The Board is deeply impressed 
with the magnitude and importance of their work. Large cities are 
growing up to be supplied with the gospel and houses of worship. 
Large country fields are being opened up for Christian work by rail- 
roads running through them. The nation of Cuba is at our doors 
to be evangelized and led tO' Christ. A foreign population is press- 
ing into much of our territory that needs our care and attention. 
A large mountain section is calling for help to build up much need- 
ed schools, and we have the Indians and Negroes among usi to help 
and bless. May these fields, white for the harvest, that the Master 
has put upon us, bring forth our prayers, work and gifts that we 
shall help the Convention raise its pledge of twelve thousand dol- 
lars, and heartily and faithfully enter into this great work of the 
Board, which will require the united efforts of all our Southern 
States. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. K. HOWELL. 

The treasurer of the Association, Brother A. G. Wilcox, then offer- 
ed his report, which, upon motion, was received and adopted. 

Tar River Association, In account with A. G. Wilcox, Treasurer. 

Oct., 1903. 

To balance due Associa $ 3.73 



12 MINUTES OF THE 

Received of Finance Committee for Foreign Missions.... 102. :;i 

Received of Finance Committee for Home Missions 5.50 

Received of Finance Committee for Btate Missions 54.58 

Received of Finance Committee for Education 15.00 

Received of 5'inance Committee for Orphanage 29. OS 

Received of Finance Co'mxmittee for Aged Ministers 12. al 

Received cash collection for Aged Ministers 17. uO 

Received cash collection for Orphanage 30.8G 

Received for Minute fund 82.50 

Marmaduko for Baptist Female University 2.00 

Red Bud for Associational Missions $12.00 

Red Bud for Orphanage 2.20 

Red Bud for Minutes 1.40 

Cash collection for Associational Missions 3.00 

Received from Cedsr Branch for Associational Missions.... 5.00 

Received from Cedar Branch for Minutes 1.00 



Total $379.97 

CONTRA. 

By amount pa.id Walters Durham Foreign Missions- $102.31 

By amount paid Walters Durham, Home Missions 5.50 

By amount paid State Missions 54.58 

By amount paid Education 15.00 

By amount paid Orphanage 29.08 

Amount paid Aged Ministers 12.81 

CasJi collection 17.00 

J. B. Boon, cash collection, Orphanage 30. 8G 

R. T. Vann from Marmaduke, B. F. U 2.00 

Jesse Herbert, Printing Minutes 60.00 

Clerk's fee 25.00 

Stationery,, stamps, mailing minutes 1.00 

Blank Church Letters and mailing same LOG 

Paid N. Biggs, Associational Missions Red Bud 12.00 

Paid N. Biggs, Associational Missions. Cedar Branch 5.00 

Paid N. Biggs, Associational Missions, cash coIlectTon 3.00 

Paid S. H. Averitt from Red Bud 2.20 

'j'o balance due Association this day l.f:7 



$379.97 

Respectfully submitted 

A. G. WILCOX, ' Treas. 
Examined and approved. 

THOS. B. WILDER, Auditor. 
Oct. 5. 1904. 



Brother T M. Arrington. the moderator, va? elected as a dele- 
gitc lo Mio Soiitliern Baptist Ccnvenuon and Brotlier T J. Taylor 
as alternate 

Delegates to the Baptist State Convention consisting of Breth- 
ren G "?I. Duke. W. H. Kimball, and J. T. Jenkins were elected and 
alternates; B. Craig, G T. Lumpkins and A. G. Wilcox. 

Associ.ition tho!;! adjourned. Benediction by Brother Jenkins. 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 13 

Thurs'Jay morning, 

&.30 o'cloclc. 
Af socialioi'\ n'.et and was ied in devotional .service by Brothor 
Howell. Minutes of yesterday read and approved. Moderator an- 
nounced standing oomniittees for next year (See page 1.) / 



REPORT ON WOMAN'S WORK. 

Report on Worrian's AAT'ork was read by IJrother .Tosiah Crudup, 
and after an address by said brother the report was adopted. 

It is the pleasure of this Association to again g-ive to the Woman's 
Work our most cordial commendation. Heathenism and sin have 
ever borne hardest on woman^ and Christian women have ever 
stood with the foremos-„ in prayers, in self-sacri.Tce, :n labors for 
the spreading of the gospel. It is only within recent years, ho>v- 
ever, that tlieir efforts liave been organized. BYom its organization 
tlxe Woman's Work has .steadily and rapidly grown, not only in 
increased contributions in money from year to jear, Dut in the con- 
stant widening of its sphere of activity 

Last year the societies of North Carolina contributed over 
$12,000.00. and the societies of the South contributed over $112,000 
to the objects claiming the support of Southern Baptists. The ob- 
ject of the Wo]nan's Missionary Union, as^ stated m their consti- 
tution, is: 

1. To distribute missionary information and stimulate effort, 
through State Central Committees, where they exist and where 
they do not, to encourage the organization of new societies. 

2. To secure the earnest, systematic co-operation of women aii.;l 
children in collecting and raising money for missions, 

Tr.e figure.^- sho-w ta^ii- s\iccess in the accomplishment of the sec- 
ond object. We believe that thev havp been qtiite as successful in 
the accon.plishment of ihe Hrst object, namely, informing and Ftiin- 
ulating to missionary effort. We would recognize the magnificent 
worls. that our good women are accovjiplishing through the socie- 
ties, and would assure tbem that we rejoice in it with all our heart. 
Thy}- are laboring with us in the gospel and God is Dlessing tieir 
labors, and we would ring out to all our people, and especially to 
our pastors, the apostle's injunction, "Help those women which la- 
bored with me in the gospel." Help the societies, where organized, 
and organize societies in churches that have them not. 

RespecLtully submitted, 

JOSIAH CRUDUP. 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher, reported as follows: 
Tarboro the place, time Tuesday after first Sunday in October, 
1905, at 11 o'clock. To preach opening sermon, G. T. Lumpkin; 
alternate, J. T. Jenkins; G. L. Merrell for committee. Report 
adonted. 

The report on education was the next thing in the order of busi- 
ness and Bro. Loftin read the report for Bro. Gaskins. The report 
Y^f&s amended by striking out certain features pertaining to hig'^i 
schools, compulsory education, etc., and as amended, was adopted. 

Your committee i& glad to note an increased interest in educa- 
tion, not only along denominational lines, but throughout the State. 



14 MINUTES OF THE 

The Baptist cause in North Carolina has progressed in proportion, 
is we liave espoused education. Christianity, apart from enlighten- 
ment, avails buit little, so far as it relates to the establishment of a 
permanent, desirable status of society and the general development 
of mankind. - - 

Out educational Institutions need no words of praise to com- 
mend them to the people since they have repeatedly exemplified 
their merits by the lines of noble sons, who have devoted their en- 
'ergies to every phase of society which malies foir the well being of 
the state. 

' Since the ministers' domain isi broad and includes a relationship, 
either directly or indirectly lo every phase of life, we, therefore, 
believe in a broad, liberal and educated ministry and heartily com- 
tnend to our people the work of the Board of Education at "Wlalte 
Forest College, under whose auspices ministerial education is fos- 
tered. 

We believe in education by denominational enterprise, where 
such effort will promote denominational interest, and to this end 
we cheerfully recommend to our people, for their loyalty, patronage 
and support. Woke Forest College, the Baptist Female University, 
Chowan Baptist Female Institute, Oxford Female Seminary and 
other institutions under Baptist control in North Carolina. 

Bro. Cade was given a collection for his mountain school amount- 
ing to $8.1G. 

Bro. Hufham offered the following resolution which was adopted: 

Whereas, The next session of this body will be the 75th anni- 
versary; and. 

Whereas, The years that have gone have all been marked by the 
goodness of the Lord in guiding us and in bringing forth holy 
living, large endeavor and great achievement; therefore, be it, 

Resiolved, That we deem it fitting at our next session to make 
grateful recognition of the glorious past ahd prayerfully turn our 
faces to a yet more glorious future. 

Resolved, That M. P. Davis, G. T. Lumpkin and B. Craig be ap- 
pointed to arrange for memorial exercises at our next session, in- 
cluding a commemoration address, and hour of praise and suppli- 
cation, and such other exercises as may occur to them. 

Treasurer of Executive Com,mittee offered his report which was 
adopted. 

Finance Committee reported as follows: Your committee reports 
that we have received the following amoimts: 

Associational missions $2,051.97 

Foreign missions 134.17 

Home missions 22.06 

State missions 26.83 

Education 56.21 

Orphanage 91.86 

Aged ministers 28.98 

Minutes 94.18 

Sunday school and colportage 2.00 

$2,508.26 
IVEY ALLEN, 
Chairman. 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 15 

THE TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION IN ACCOUNT WITH NOAH 

BIGGS, TREASURER. 

1904. 

Oct. 1 To cash paid Rev. G. W. Coppedge $ 60.00 

Oct. 1 To cash paid Rev. J. T. Edmondson 50.00 

Oct. 1 To cash paid Rev. T. J. Cris,p ^ 91.25 

Oct. 1 To cash paid Rev. J. K. Howell^ 50.00 

Oct. 1 To cash paid Rev. T. S. Crutchfleld 83.32 

Oct. 1 To cash paid Rev. J. A. Garrett 125.00 

Oct. 1 To cash paid Rev. I. N. Loftin 125.00 

Oct. 1 To cash paid Rev. J. W. Etowney 125.00 

Oct. 1 To cash paid Rev. G. L. Merrell 350.00 

Oct. 1 To cash paid Rev R. D. Carroll 18.75 

Oct. 1 To cash paid Rev. N. L. Gaskins 200.00 

Oct. 1 To cash paid Rev. A. G. Wilcox 50.00 

Oct. 1 To cash paid Rev. J. E. Hocut 250.00 

Oct. 1 To cash paid Rev. J. K. Henderson 100.00 

Oct. 1 To cash paid Rev. Harriss .. 50.00 

Oct. 1 To cash paid Rev. J. E. Hudson 25.00 

Oct. 1 To cash paid Rev. B. K. Mason 8.35 

Total ; , n,761.87 

Cr 

1903 

Oct. 1 By balance due association I 239.85 

Oct. 8 By cash from association 1,709.58 

Oct. 8 By cash Edgar Barkley 2.50 

Oct. 8 By cash A. G. WUcox , 20.00 

Total .$1,971.93 

By balance due association $ 210.26 

Examined and approved, October 5, 1904., 
THOMAS B. WILDER, . 
Auditor. 



-The next thing in order was Sunday schools, and Brother 
Cruitchfield read the report for Brother Hilliard. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

The Sunday School is an open field for great and effective Chris- 
tian work. More and more it is an acknowledged factor in the work 
of the church; and so its various departments are enlisting th3 
talents of our best and ablest men. 

The great aim of the Sunday School is to induce the people, both, 
young and old, to study the Word of God. And tiiere is cause for 
thanksgiving for the growing influence and power of this depart- 
ment of Christian work. The more the Sunday School is encour- 
aged and the more general the work the more is learned of the 
Bible, and the more the people learn of the great and living truths 



16 MINUTES OF THE 

of the Bible the stronger the church of Christ on earth and the 
safer the institutions for good which are made possible by the 
church's power. 

The Sunday School then becomes a co-operative rorce with the 
church as a safeguard for the interests that foster the u est and high- 
est type of citizenship. 

Besides serving as a breakwater against the floods of evil whicn 
would sweep over community, State and National life here at home, 
the Sundey School greatly aids the work of sending the gospel of 
Christ to heathen lands. The Bible is missionary in its teaching, 
and to become surcharged with Bible truth, is to esipou'se the spirit 
of missions to the full ; and this is the chief aim of the Sunday 
School. 

The opportunities in the Sunday School today are the very bugle 
call tO' God's people to take this land for Christ. Ana in taking this 
land for Christ we swell the ranks of those who are batling against 
evil and idolatry in foreign lands, and so help girdle the globe witn 
the holy gospel of God, which is the good news of salvation to all 
who shall hear it. 

He is indeed a drone in the working church of Christ whose sym- 
pathies and best energies are not actively enlisted in the Sunday 
School of his church. It is the place for those who know the truth 
to attain unto their own highest developmient in teaching it to eth- 
ers; and it is the place for those who are ignorant of the truth to 
learn the fear of the Lord, which the Bible tells us is "the beginning 
of v/isdom." 

It is hereby suggested and recommended that all practicable and 
possible means be employed which will quicken the interest in Sun- 
day Schools with all the members of the churches of this body. 
Every church that possibly can should maintain an evergreen Sunday 
School, using such helps and literature as will best promote the 
successful STudy of the Bible. It is indeed a great field of Chri-s-tian 
usfulness and influence in which child and parent, the young and the 
old, may profitably and joyfully meet on common gr-juind in leairning 
the greatest of all truth, which lifts us nearer to God on earth and 
prepares us for that inheritance which fadeth not away in the 
Great Bevond. 

E. E. HILLIABD. 

After speeches by Brethren Broughton, Hufham, Kimball, Cade, 
Craig, Morgan and Bailey the report was adopted. 



Report of Historian was called for, and Brother Hufham read the 
report for Brother Duke as follows: 

Brother Moderator and Brethren: — Writing history is to me a' 
new experience and I find it slow work. I have, however, gathered 
some material and commenced the work, and hope by next Associa- 
tion, under the blessing of God to have the history completa 
Respectfully, 

G. M. DUKE. 

Brother Craig made a statement in regard to a church in Martin 
county and collection in cash and pledges taken as follows: N. 
Biggs, $10; T. M. Arrington, $10; O. L. Pittman, pd. $5; Red Oak, 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. I7 

$5; Stony Creek, $5; Dr. Johnson, $5; Wilson, $5; Sunbeams Rocky 
Mount, $5; G. L. Merrill, $3; J. W. Bailey, $5; J. T. Jenkins, $1; 
G. T. Lumpkin pd. $1; W. S. Dozier $2; John Coppedge, $1; J. :^. 
Harriss, $1; B. F. Gray, $1, J. D. Hufham, $2; M. P. Davis, $1; Mrs. 
John Uzzle pd. $1; Mrs. Sledge pd $1; G. M. Duke, $10; Wilson Sun- 
beams, $1; Ed. Shearin pd. $1; Cash, $4.80; Bro. Lumpkin, $5; Mrs. 
A. M. Hall, $1; Bro. Griffin, $1; W. T. &!hearin pd. 50c. 
Total, $97.30. 

The report on Temperance was read by Brother May. 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 

Paul reasoned about righteousness, temperance and the .iudgmen< 
to come. Temperance in all things is enjoined upon us by the scrip- 
tures, but in speaking of wine Solomon said: "Look thou not upon 
the wine when it is red, when it giveth its color in th3 cup, when it 
moveth itself aright. At the last it biteth like a serpent and sting- 
eth like an adder," 

There are many forms of intemperance, but none press upon our 
people like alcohol, and all have their ciigin in it. The burden of 
our pastors still is the drinking members. 

The prouLotion of temperance in our State means prosperity along 
all lines, and the elevating of oui State to the sphere which its 
brawn and brain make it capable. Mere than rine tenths of our 
State's area is under prohibition, but there ai ; thousands of moth- 
-ers who look to the night with horioi for the^r sons are still exposed 
to the influence of the saloon. 

Present Ifegtslation against the salocn is gc&d as Tar as it goes, 
but it is too narrow, it is not co-exteasiv 3 with the State's area, and 
nothing short of North Carolina free from Hs ix)wer will satisfy us. 

We should work unceasingly to ele^t men who will strengthen and 
broaden present law, and follow them with petitions and our influ- 
ence to the "legislative hall, so that they may lock out for our inter- 
est and that of future generations. 

G. W. MAY, 
Committee. 

He followed the report with a fine addrecs. Brother J. W. Bailey 
spoke on the subject, after which the report was adopted. 

The report on Aged Ministeirs was offered by Bro, Lumpkin. 

REPORT ON AGED MINISTERS. 

Your committee notes with pleasure an increase in contributions 
to this wor.hy cause, both in the Tar River Association and the 
State at lanre. There has been an increase in the number of ben- 
eflciaries. Twenty-three families are paitially supported by this 
Board in the State. For last year tht disbursements to these fam- 
ilies amounted to $1,427.80. The largest amount given any benefi- 
ciary during last year was $67.50, This is not all they deserve, no" 
indeed is i*-, all they need. More money is needed to supply the 
needs of these faithful but aged ministers of Chr'sc. A more deserv- 
ing work of charity does not present itself to the Baptist people 1;? 
our State. Much tf the best we possess today we owe to the earn- 
est, untirina: effo \ i of these old veterans of the cross. Your com- 



18 MINUTES OF THE 

mittee makes bold to say that there is no work of beneflcene in our 
catalogue which will elicit greater sympathy or heartier response if 
faithfully and earnestly presented to our people. Our Baptist peo- 
ple are not .ingrateful. Acquaint <-hem with the facts and the needs 
and they will respond. Your committee would call special attention 
to the permanent interest bearing fund now at the disposal of the 
Board, and suggest that a handsome thing it would be for some of 
our brethren to remember these old veterans in their wills and add to 
this special fund. 

Your committee recommends that the Tar River Association make 
an effort to raise ?250 for Aged Ministers during the next A&socia- 
tional year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. T. LUMPKIN, Committee. 

He followed with an address. Dr. Johnson also spoke on the 
subject and the report was adopted. 

Brother Hufham secured the following additional subscriptions to 
Associational Missions: G. M. Duke, $10; B. Crrarg, $10; W. FI. 
Bowers for J. D. H., $10; J. D. Hufham, $10; O. L. Pittman, J. M. 
Colman, $10; N. Biggs, $10; W. H. White, $5; Poplar S'pring, $5; 
N. B. Bergeron, $5; A. G. Wilcox, $10; Ed. Shearin, $2; Corinth, $5; 
Peach Tree $2.50; Macon, $2.50; Bro. Jackson, $5; Wm. Jackson, 
$2.50; A. C. Davis, pd. $1. Total, $105.50. 

The fo'llowing resolution of thanks was offered by Brother Craig, 
which was adopted by a risang vote: 

WHERE.'^S, the present session has been a great, gathering of 
brethren in the Lord, and whereas our gatherings have been charac- 
terized by harmony and brotherly love, and whereas, the church and 
community have giveni to us the sweetest hospitality, therefore, 

Resolved, That we hereby tender our thanks to Almighty God 
for his goodness to us during the session. 

Resolved. That our thanks are due and are hereby tendered to 
the pastor and the members of the church, and to the citizens of 
the community for their thoughtfulness and courtesy and unvary- 
ing kindness. 

Resolved, That our thanks are due and hereby tendered to our 
brethren at Louisburg and Spring Hope for many kindnesses, and 
especially in aiding delegates and visitors on their way to and from 
this session of the Association. 

The Clerk was ordered to have the usual number of minutes print- 
ed and to receive the usual compensation for his services. 

"Blest be the Tie that Binds," was sung, and after a fervent prayer 
by Brother Duke the moderator declared the Association adjourned 
to meet with the church in Tarboro on Tuesday after the first Sun- 
day in October, 1905. 

T, M. ARRINGTON, 
A. G. WILCOX Moderator. 

Clerk and Treasurer. 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 
DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS 



19 



CHURCHES. 


1 
g 

s 

1903 


to 

1 

s 

1904 


9> 

u 

a 


1) 

ca 

0) 

u 




m 

ft 

1903 


m 

ft 

'5 


W 
1904 



a 


10 



Q 




70 


65 




5 


$ 40 13 


66 45 


26 32 


$ 




Battleboro 


60 
160 
41 
64 
145 
51 
87 


45 
167 
43 
67 
136 
61 
90 
132 
192 
49 
28 
185 
15 
131 
141 
20 
14 
81 
120 
56 
116 
97 


7 

2 
3 

"'"io 

3 
132 


15 
9 


116 61 
41 75 

150 34 
62 31 

337 80 
83 02 

127 50 


90 18 

32 50 
156 67 

71 22 
300 56 

98 37 
118 50 
1 00 
132 61 
161 76 

43 90 
205 85 
4 00 
128 70 
198 67 
112 70 
771 00 
1029 41 

57 25 
343 34 

76 00 
141 48 


'e'ss 

8 91 

"is'ss 
'""i'66 

"4"66 

13 70 
18 21 

"77i'o6 

530 28 

6 25 

199 82 


26 43 
9 25 


Bethel 










37 24 








9 00 








192 
52 
28 

172 
17 

107 

126 
23 




184 57 
178 44 
92 93 
244 05 

"iis'oo 

180 46 
163 15 

"499 is 

51 00 
143 52 
129 72 
180 20 


51 96 






3 


16 68 


Conoho 


49 03 




13 

""24 
15 

""ii 


2 

3 

3 

11 
10 
20 

7 


38 20 


Crocker's Chapel 








Kagles 


50 45 


Elm Citv 


84 
131 

66 
136 
104 








Enfield 




En terprise 


53 72 




38 72 








67 

156 

58 

125 

6 

51 

108 

142 

86 

41 

64 


76 
155 

42 

169 

6 


9 
""44 


i 

16 


116 68 
296 47 
141 41 
1634 48 


123 62 

337 67 

76 52 

2077 80 

12 45 


6 94 
41 20 

"443'32 
12 45 










64 89 






Halifax 








51 
3 


199 48 
293 34 
2167 76 
190 18 
221 26 
145 40 






117 

139 

86 

38 

43 

102 

126 

209 

67 

72 

196 

47 

60 

33 

33 

64 

148 

160 

32 

174 

70 

70 

107 

139 

60 


9 


141 50 

1924 31 

151 66 

297 22 

53 60 
198 56 
552 18 
1497 00 

86 10 
213 40 
530 00 
143 83 
185 38 
4 40 

60 00 

88 10 
167 00 
151 74 
114 00 
322 72 

95 80 
106 35 
249 24 
666 94 
109 39 


""75"% 

""ios'se 

191 02 

"is 63 

33 06 

289 50 

64 83 

""4'46 
4 00 
88 10 
78 25 

"■"7i'40 

"ioio 

8 06 


151 84 




243 46 


Hickory 


38 52 




'■'162 

13 

'""io 

12 

i 

3 
33 

■ " "64 
2 

" " '23 
31 

20 
22 


3 
21 






91 80 






Littleton 


113 
211 

60 

207 

46 

57 


2 

" "ii 


361 16 
4913 75 
68 07 
180 34 
250 50 
79 00 
260 00 






3416 '(ij 




















74 62 


Mid way 




Mildred 


39 


2 


66 00 










146 
64 
34 

151 
39 
50 
85 

149 
63 
22 

192 

154 
67 

194 

385 
65 


4 

2 

""io 

3 
22 

3 
13 

2 

i 

65 


88 75 
166 80 

42 60 
619 64 

15 70 

98 30 
560 25 
722 08 
119 41 

86 86 
116 21 
488 00 
458 82 
209 10 
406 47 

76 89 




Mt. Zion 


15 06 






New Bethel 


396 92 












316 20 




55 14 




10 02 








189 
141 
65 
214 
384 


" "26 


136 68 
132 64 
336 06 
131 21 
729 06 


2C 7 
322'59 






355 36 




122 76 




77 89 








76 89 


Red Bud 


1 161 


iei 


iig 90 


iig 90 





20 MINUTES OF THE 

DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS. -(Concluded.) 



Red Oak 

Reedy Creek 

Riddick's Grove.. - 
Moanoke Rapids... 

Robersonville 

Rock Spring 

Rocky Mount 

Rosemary 

Samaria 

Sandy Creek 

Scotland Neck 

Sharon 

Social Plains 

South Henderson. 

Spring Hope 

Stanhope 

Stony Creek 

Sulphur Springs. . 

Tarboro 

TiUery 

Turkey Br nch . . . 

Vauffhns 

Warsaw Plains. . . 

Warrenton 

Washington 

Williamston 

Wilson 

Weldon 



Total 87 07 



118 
170 
18 
123 
9 
125 
247 



249 

275 

374 

156 

58 

58 

67 

45 

152 

48 

157 

S5 

35 

56 

130 

160 

111 

97 



115 
175 

16 
125 

11 
130 
270 

53 
251 
279 
364 
167 

53 

91 

4' 

45 
162 

74 
174 

32 

24 

61 
134 
162 
120 

99 
300 

90 



9668 



"5 

2 

2 

5 

23 

53 


3 

2 


179 60 
151 35 
26 92 
468 31 
527 29 
234 05 
2257 19 


2 
4 

""ii 

5 
34 


""16 
""26 


163 75 
76 00 

4S82 40 

22b 05 

84 32 

419 72 

368 70 

164 43 


10 
26 
17 

5 

4 
2 
9 
2 
300 
12 


3 

11 

:::::: 


334 74 

43 41 

638 07 

4S9 17 

11 06 

365 00 

152 78 

1300 56 

1324 04 

875 66 

983 50 

1541 61 






37191 74 



205 85 

146 01 

2 25 

727 86 

51 00 

202 81 

2237 42 

2C'4 11 

228 89 

154 54 

3894 83 

373 05 

49 07 

102 55 

146 28 

87 56 

336 57 

102 97 

736 35 

267 06 

40 84 

77 00 

188 38 

1107 80 

1165 81 

710 02 

1278 13 

2217 50 



30952 57 



28 25 






8 34 




24 67 


259 55 







476 29 





31 24 


23 




204 11 




65 74 




78 54 






987 57 


144 00 






35 25 




35 25 




317 17 




76 87 


i 83 




54 56 




98 28 






222 11 


29 78 






288 66 


35 60 






192 76 




158 23 




165 64 


294 63 




675 89 









5 churches, viz., Aurora, Ebenezer, Joyner's Chapel, Midway and 
Mountain Grove, were admitted this year, making the total number 
of Churches in the Association 92. 

82 Churches reported last year a membership of 8707. 

87 Churches report this year a membership of 9668, making a net 
gain of 961. 

5 Churches failed to report at this session. 

The Churches reported a decrease of $6,239.17 this year. This is 
due to the fact that last year Louisburg and Scotland Neck were 
building, and a number of our Churches made special collection last 
year for the Baptist University for Women. 

The Churches report more for missions than ever before, 

JoSIAH CHUDUP, 

Braxton Craig, 
Morgan, 

Committee. 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 



21 



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MINUTES 



OF THE 



SEVENTY=FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION 



OF THE 



Tar River. Association, 

HELD WITH THE CHURCH IN 

TARBOR^O, N. C, 

Octobei-3, 4,5, 1905. 



THE NEXT SESSION TO BE HELD WITH THE 
CHUR.CH AT RED OAK, NASH COUNTY, 

Tuesday after the First Sunday in 
October, 1906, at II a, m. 

To Preach Introductory Sermon, - - - S. L. MORGAN. 
Alternate. J. D. LARKIN. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: 

N. Biggs. E. W. Shearin, T. C. Ferguson, . W. H. Ragsdale, 

T. M. Arrington, O. L. Pitman, T. B. Wilder, 

B. F. Briggs. 



OFFICERS: 



T. M. ArringtdN. ^Moderator, - - - Rocky Mount, N. C. 
A. G. WiLLCOX, Clerk and Treasurer, - - Spring Hope, N. C. 

1905. 

ENFIELD LEDGER PRINT, 

ENFIELD. N. C. 



STANDING COMMITTES. 

Aged Ministers Ivey Allen 

Orphanage G. T. Lumpkin 

Education G. W. May 

Temperance T. J. Taylor 

Periodicals J. E. Ayscue 

Woman's Work T. S. Crutchfield 

Sunday Schools J. E. Hocutt 

Associational Missions B. Craig- 

State Missions J. D. Larkin 

Home Missions G. L. Merrell 

Foreign Missions J. T. Jenkins 

PASTORS AND POST OFFICES. 

AYSCUE, J. E. , Greenyille 

BOBBITT, WALTER, Vaughns 

CRAIG, B. Rocky Mount 

CREE, A., Embro 

CRISP, T. J., Conetoe 

CARROLL, R. D., Williamston 

COPPEDGE. G. W. , Wakefield 

CRUTCHFIELD. T. S. , Roanoke Rapids 

CRUDUP, JOSIiVH, Washington 

CULLOM, W. R. , Wake Forest 

CULLOM. J. R., Bunns 

DAVIS, M. P. , Tarboro 

DUNN, BEN, Wake Forest 

DUKE, G. M. , Mapleville 

EDMUNDSON, J. T. Raleigh 

HENDERSON, J. K. , Scotland Neck 

HOCUTT, J. E. , Nashville 

HUNTER, A. D. , Gary 

HOWELL, J. K. , Rocky Mount 

HOWELL, J. D., Hobgood 

HOLMES, G. W. , Epsora 

JENKINS, J. T. , Wilson 

LARKIN, J. D. , Henderson 

LUMPKIN, G. T. , Scotland Neck 

LOFTIN, J. N. , Henderson 

MAY, G. W. , Rocky Mount 

MARSHALL. O. N. Henderson 

MASHBURN, H. H. , Louisburg- 

MORGAN, S. L. , Littleton 

MORGAN, J. W. , Weldon 

MERRELL. G. L. , Rocky Mount 

NOWELL, W. C. , Nashville 

PACE, J. R. , Oxford 

SLEDGE, J. W., Cedar Rock 

TAYLOR, T. J. , Warrenton 

WILLIAMS, C. C. , Spring Hope 

WILLCOX, A. G. , Spring Hope 



Minutes of the Tar River Association. 



PROCEEDINGS. 

Tarboro, October 3, 1905. 

The Tar River Association met with the church here to-day in its 
seventy-fiftli annual session. The Moderator called the Association 
to order, and was led in prayer by Brother T. J. Taylor, after which 
Brother G. T. Lumpkin preached the introductory sermon. Text : 
John 8th chapter, 32d verse. 

The roll of churches was then called and the followino' responded by 
letter and deleg'ates : 

Antioch — L. L. Hamill. 

Aurora — 

Battleboro— S. A. Ward, T. D. Wright. 

Bear Swamp — Richard Collins. 

Bethel — J. T. Eubanks. 

Bethlehem — Jesse Carter. 

Brown's — J. W. Smithwick. 

Gary's Chapel — By Letter. 

Castalia — W. R. Drake. 

Cedar Branch — H. G. Madden. 

Cedar Rock — Thos. W. Wheeless. 

Conoconary — Jacob Ellen. 

Conoho — Jas. L. Casper. 

Corinth— W. D. Fuller. 

Crocker's Chapel — E. H. Crocker, T. J. Lewis, C. G. Rose. 

Cypress Chapel — By Letter. 

Dawson's — C. E. Pope. 

Eagles — Albert Anderson, Orlander Pollard. 

Ebenezer— K. O. Weeks, E. J. Hurdle. 

Elm City— A. J. Rowland, W. W. Barnes. 

Elm Grove — E. R. Rockley, A. C. Williams. 

Enfield — S. S. Alsop. 

Enterprise — W. W. Bobbitt. 

Ephesus — W. H. Abernathy, Sam Hendricks, W. M. Warren. 

Everett's— J. A. Whitley. 

Fishing Creek — W. W. Rosser, W. F. Shearin,~Geo. Ward. 

Gardner's — T. P. Shearin. 

Gethsemane — O. L. Pitman, J. C. Marks. 

Greenville — W. H. Ragsdale. 

Halifax — 

Hamilton — By Letter. 

Harriss Chapel — G. M. Hamlet, C. S. Shearin. 

Henderson — J. D. Larlvin. 

Hickorv— T. E. Powell. J. L. Alford, S. B. Dozier. 

Hobgood— J. D. Howell, F. A. Ruffin. 

John's Chapel — G. L. Finch. 

Joyner's Chapel — B T. Pearce, G. L. Pearce. 

Littleton— E. C. Bobbitt, S. L. Morgan. 

Louisburg — IveyAllen, W. M. Boon, Thos. B. Wilder. 

Macedonia — J. C. Taylor, J. L. Tyson. 

Macon— By Letter. 

Maple Springs — W. H. Stallings. 

Marmaduke— M. T. Duke. 

Middleburg— 

Midway— C. T. Perry. 

Mildred— 



4 Minutes of the Tar River Association. 

Mountain Grove — W. D. Dawsey, Willey Ayskew,Thos.Tiiarrington 

Mt. Hebron— S. T. Gupton. 

Mt. Zion — Cleveland Foster. 

Nashville— L. T. Vauohn. B. G. Alford. 

New Bethel— G. W. Holmes. 

New Hope— G. R. Dew. 

New Sandy Creek — By Letter. 

North Henderson— O.'N. Marshall. 

North Rockv Mount— F. C. Fero'uson, G. L. Merrell. 

Oak Level— J. W. Bone, T. A. Bone. 

Pactolus — By Letter. 

Peach Tree— J. C. Wheless, J. H. Mitchell, W. F. May. 

Pleasant Grove — G. A. Martin. 

Plvmouth— E. Ludford. 

Philadelphia— M. C. Griffin. 

Poplar Spring-s — S. J. Alford, J. A. Pippin. 

Quankee — G. VV. Green. 

Red Bud — By Letter. 

Red Oak— A. H. Whitley, J. M. Griffin. 

Reedy Creek — By Letter. 

Riddick's Grove — 

Roanoke Rapids— T. S. Crutchlield. 

Robersonville — Spfer Cochran. 

Rock Sprino— B. F. Wilder. 

Rocky Mount- T. M. x-Vrrington, E. W. Shearin, T. R. Bullock. 

Rosemary — J. W. Ferrell. 

Samaria — W. B. Bei'geron, J. H. Woodard, B. O. Cone. 

Sandy Creek — 

Scotland Neck — E. E. Hilliard, Hugh Johnson, R. C. Josey. 

Sharon — Bv Letter. 

Social Plains— J. T. Alford, H. N. Wheeler. 

South Henderson — By Letter. 

Spring- Hope — G. A. Martin, A. G. Willcox. 

Stanhope — S. R. Pierce. 

Stony Creelv— John H. Griffin, J. A. Newell, E. S. Harper. 

Sulphur Springs — By Letter. 

Tarboro — C. J. Austin, W. E. Shearin, Fred Williams. 

Tillery— J. K. Howell. 

Turkey Branch — A. E. Hull. 

Vaughns — J. T. Edmondson. 

Warren Plains — Bv Letter. 

Warrenton— T. J. Taylor, W. D. Weldon, J. W. Allen. 

Washington — E. L. Dawson. 

Weldon — J. L. Harriss, Sedden Goode. 

Williamston — J. W. Anderson, S. A. Newell, J. B. Quartermas. 

Wilson — H. J. Hester, Z. T. Broughton, D. R. Petway. 

The roll of churches being completed the Association was permanent- 
ly organized by re-election of the former officers, T. M. Arrington, 
Moderator ; A. G. Willcox, Clerk and Treasurer, and G. M. Duke. 
Historian. 

Moderator appointed Brethren E. L. Dawson, W. W. Rosser and S. 
R. Pierce on Finance Committee, Brother M. P. Davis and Deacons of 
church on Religious Exercises. 

On motion a committee, consisting of Brethren Lumpkin, Mashburn 



Minutes of the Tar River Association. 5 

and Jenkins, was appointed to report to this Association on the advis- 
ability of employing- an Associational evangelist. 

On motion of Brother T. J. Taylor, a committee consisting- of 
Brethren Lumpkin, Ivey Allen, R. D. Carroll and W. H. Ragsdale, 
was appointed to confer with a committee appointed by the Union of 
Unions at Scotland Neck to bring to the attention of the Association 
the question of establishing x-Vssociational Schools, and report to this 
body on that subject. 

A^isiting brethren invited to seats and accepted by Brother E. E. 
Bomar, Assistant Secretary of Foreign Mission Board ; Brother J. W. 
Noble and W. H. Riddick, of AYest Chowan; Brother J. G. Dukes, of 
Wilmington Association : J. H. King, of Neuse Association. 

New pastors recognized and welcomed among us and Brother Askew, 
of Greenville, and Brother Eubanks, of Bethel, made brief responses. 

Adjourned for dinner. Dismissed by Brother Jenkins. 

Tuesday, 2 o'clock. 

Association led in prayer by Brother Eubanks. 

Committee on order of business made partial report as follows : 2:.30, 
Siuiday Schools : 3:15, Periodicals ; 4:00, Temperance. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 
Believing that the Sunday School is the church engaged in studying 
and teaching the Scriptures, that this work is clearly authorized in the 
Bible, that it is one of the richest and ripest fields of Christian endeav- 
or at the present time, that in many homes Bible teaching to the chil- 
dren is seriously lacking, that our State Convention is seeking wisely 
to emphasize it as a factor in our development, and that for us as 
churches and associations it presents a, wide-open door of splendid op- 
portunity, your committee would earnestly recommend : 

1. That all our churches put more life, energy and consecration 
into this imperative teaching vrork committed to them. 

2. That every Sunday School be kept open, if possible, for every 
Sunday in the year. 

3. That special effort be made by pastors, superintendents and oth- 
er workers to enlist in tlie Sunday School, the adult members of the 
churches as well as an increased attendance on the part of the chil- 
ren. 

4. That we encourage the organization of branch Sunday Schools 
and Mission Schools wherever practicable, so that a Sunday School 
may be accessible to every man, vronian and child within the bounds 
of our Association. 

5. That each school send fall reports to the Association so that the 
Sunday School table in the minutes may contain a complete report of 
everything done by the school. 

G. Tliat our schools provide themselves with Baptist literature (as 
that furnished by our Sunday School Board of Nashville, Tenn. ), or- 



6 Minutes of the Tar River Association. 

dering the same throug'h our Baptist Book Store, Raleigh, N G. , ten 
or fifteen days before it is needed for distribution. 

7. That we arrange with our efficient State Sunday School Secre- 
tary, Elder Right C. Moore, of Raleigh, to hold within our territory 
during the year, one or more Sunday School Institutes, with a view to 
training our officers and teachers and improving our Sunday School 
condition. 

8. That we have a Sunday School Convention by utilizing our 
Union Meeting in April (or July), 1906, devoting it entirely to the 
consideration of Sunday School topics and the unifying of our Sun- 
day School forces. 

9. That we heartily endorse the Sunday School Department of the 
Baptist State Convention, that we recognize "Sunday School Mis- 
sions" as one of our regular objects of benevolence, and that we 
pledge ourselves to contribute towards its maintenance and enlarge- 
ment. 

10. That we believe that when we have carried out the above sug- 
gestions as Baptists in the Tar River Association, we have contrib- 
vited in the largest and most efficient way toward the betterment of the 
Sunday School interests in our State and in the world. 

JOHN THOS. JENKINS, 
Committee. 
Report on Sunday Schools was read by Brother Jenkins and after 
discussion by said Brother the report was adopted. 



REPORT ON PERIODICALS. 

The press has long been one of the most potent factors in the forma- 
tion and development of noble character, and in promoting the inter- 
ests of the different enterprises in which Christian people have been 
engaged. It has also been used by the agencies of evil and had its 
destructive effects. And to-day the output of literature, both good and 
bad, is perhaps greater than ever before, and we observe the truthful- 
ness of the Scriptural statement : "Of the making of many books there 
is no end. " Hence the quest of the day is not for something to read, 
but what to read. 

This is as true and important with reference to patriotic literature as 
to books. There is no lack of periodicals of a high order, and we are 
thankful that our Baptise people are abreast of the times in the pro- 
duction of denominational literatui^e. 

The great need now is to get our people as a whole to reading this 
literature. Hence we heartily recommend the periodicals published by 
the denomination, and desire to specially commend some of them. 

The literature published by our Sunday School Board in Nashville, 
Tenn., is well suited to the needs of our Sunday Schools, and we rec- 
ommend its use. 

The Home Field and The Foreign Mission Journal, publislied by our 



Minutes of the Tar River Association. 7 

Home and Foreign Mission Boards respectively, are both indispen- 
sable to those who would keep themselves posted as to the work which 
is being- done through these two most important agencies. 

More especially would we urge the importance of our people reading 
the publications within our own State. 

The North Carolina Baptist is doing excellent work in helping to 
spread desirable information and to keep the spirit of progress and 
enthusiasm alive 

Charity and Children performs its functions in connection with our 
orphanage work successfully and admirably. 

Most important of all is the Biblical Recorder, which has long stood 
and still stands as the exponent of the religious thought of our people. 
This paper should be read in every Baptist home in the State, and is 
worthy of a wide circulation beyond our bounds. 

We desire to call the attention of our pastors to The Baptist Review 
and Expositor, published by the faculty of our Seminary in Louis- 
ville. " • T. S. CRUTCHFIELD, 

Committee. 

Report on Periodicals was read by Brother Crutchfield and after dis- 
cussion by Brethren Craig, Sledge andlBroughton. Report adopted. 



REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 

We are confronted with a gigantic evil in the form of the liquor 
traffic. That this evil is doing its deadly work at a fearful rate is evi- 
dent to every intelligent Christian and citizen in the land. Public con- 
science is now aroused on this subject as it has not been in the history 
of the State. 

The spirit of the Bible is being infused into the hearts of our people, 
and they are blending their energies and efforts together for the estab- 
lishment and maintenance of temperance in the true sense of the word. 
We recommend that pastors and teachers use all legitimate means to 
foster and strengthen the temperance spirit and sentiment that have 
grown so in our State during the past few years. The Christian peo- 
ple have been in the lead in this movement in the State. Intemperance 
is destructive to everything that is good among us : our homes, our 
churches, our schools, our fathers, our brothers and our children. It 
hinders the progress of the kingdom of our Lord. 

Your committee would most earnestly urge upon you as individual 
Christians the importance of being true to your Master, your churcli- 
es, your homes, and your children and your souls. Plant yourself 
squarely on the Bible on this question, and preach it from the pulpit 
and teach it in your Sunday Schools, talkitaroundyour lire-sides, and 
live it in your lives. Be always on God's side. 

R. D. CARROLL. 

Report on Temperance was read by Brother Carroll and without dis- 
cussion was adopted. 



8 Minutes of the Tar PvIaer Association. 

A beautiful g-avel bearing the inscription : "Order is Heaven's First 
Law" was sent to the Association by Brotlier J. D. Christian, and 
g-racetulljr presented by Brother Braxton Craig and accepted in 
behalf of the Association by the M^oderator, whereupon Brother T. J. 
Taylor offered the following resolution, which was unanimously 
adopted : 

Resolved, That we accept with grateful appreciation the beautiful 
gavel presented to this Association by our beloved Brother J. D. 
Christian, of Rocky Mount Church. 

REPORTS ON STATE MISSIONS. 

It is not possible in a report like this to overstress the importance 
of State Missions. It is common place but tremendously true to say 
that that part of our IMission work which has for its purpose the evan- 
gelizatioi:! of the whole State bears a direct and fundamental relation 
to every part of the work. It is estimated that missionaries in the eip- 
ploy of the Board have in the last 20 years baptized nearly 30,000 peo- 
ple, that nearly one-third of the churches in the State have been or- 
ganized or aided by the Board, and that these churches contribute 
two-thirds of all the money now given to Missions by North Carolina 
Baptists. The facts overwhelmingly entitle the Board to the entire 
confidence and hearty co-operation of all our churches in carrying on 
its great and rapidly growing work. As already hinted ai the history 
of State Missions is full of glorious achievement, and in this connec- 
tion temptingly invites a more extended review than present limita- 
tions will allow. The progress made in the last fexv years is especial- 
ly gratifying. In 1900 there was r&ported for State Missions $18,- 
530.14, in 1904, $29,494.94, showing an increase of about 59 per cent. In 
1900 the Tar River Association gave to this work $456.00, and in 1904 
$591.86, showing an increase of only about 30 per cent. Or if the 
amounts appearing in the minutes for State Missions and Associational 
Missions be combined this Association gave in 1900, $1,833.03, and in 
1904, $2,573,57. showing an increase of only about 40 per cent. In the 
same period the increase in contributions to Foreign Missions in the 
State was 109 per cent, and Home Missions about 44 per cent, while in 
the Tar River Association the increase to the objects was only about 
24 per cent and 2i per cent respectively. 

Why this failure of the magnificent old Tar River to keep abreast 
of the State in its growing benevolence ? Does the fact that more than 
half of our churches give nothing to State Missions — unless Associa- 
tional Missions can be counted as State Missions — have anything to 
do with the answer '? If we fail to give due attention to this feature of 
the work may we not expect to fall behind all along the line"? What 
do you say, brother messenger, and what will your church say when 
you get back home '? 

Brother Mashburn read report on State Mission and after interest- 



Minutes of the Tar River Association. 9 

ing- and instructive speeclies bj' Brethren Masliburn and Johnson, 
Brother Taylor ottered the following resolution, which with the report, 
was adopted : 

Resolved, That the churches of this Association undertake to raise 
by the first of December, one thousand dollars for State Missions, and 
that the pastors bring this resolution to the attention of their church- 
es, and take collections. 

Brother Davis for his church and city extended to the delegates and 
visitors a refil hearty welcome, which was responded to by Brother S. 
L. Morgan in a few well chosen remarks. 

Brother Craig called the attention of the body to the fact that our 
beloved Brother G. M. Duke was prevented from attending this meet- 
ing on account of the serious illness of his daughter, and moved that 
Brother T. J. Taylor lead the Association in prayer for Brother Duke 
and his afflicted family, which was unanimously adopted, and the body 
united in an earnest prayer for our Brother. 

The Moderator appointed the following committees on Associational 
Schools : G. T. Lumpkin, R. D. Carroll, Ivey Allen, W. H. 
Ragsdale. 

On New Churches— J. K. Howell, O. L. Pitman, G. L. Merrell. 

Digest of Church Letters — B. Craig, R. M. Johnson, T. S. Crutch- 
field. 

On Order of Business— G. T. Lumpkin, T. J. Taylor, W. H. Rags- 
dale. ' 

Auditor— T. B. Wilder. 

Committee on Order of Business made a full report as follows : 

Wednesday, 10 o'clock. 

Devotional Exercises. 

10:.30— Foreign Missions. 

11:30 — Associational Missions. 

2:30 — Home Missions and Orphanage. 

7:45 — Devotional Exercises. 

8:00— Education. 

Thursday, 10 o'clock. 

Devotional Exercises. 

10:30— Woman's Work. 

11:00 — Aged Ministers, adopted. 

Adjourned by Brother May. 

Tuesday night. 

Association met and Brother Hocutt led the Devotional Exercises. 

At the request of the Moderator our venerable Brother Hufham pre- 
sided over the Memorial Services celebrating the founding of our As- 
sociation, seventy-five years ago. In the absence of Brother Duke, 
Brother Hufham told the story of the Association's past history, and 
Brother J. W. Bailey followed in an able address on the Baptist in 
the State. 



10 Minutes of the Tar River Association. 

By a rising vote the Association thanlved Brother Bailey for his ad- 
dress and requested its publication. 

Brother John Brewer. Brother Livingston Johnson and Brother J. 
W. Bailey, over- welcomed to seats. 

Adjourned. Prayer by Brother Sledge. 

Wednesday, 10 o'clock. 

Association re-assembled and spent half hour in devotional exer- 
cises, led by Brother !\Iashburn. 

T\linutes of yesterday read and adopted. 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher, report as follows : Place, 
Red Oak : Time, Tuesday after first Sunday in October, at 11 o'clock; 
S. L. Morgan to preach Introductory Sermon: Brother J. D. Larkin, 
Alternate: John T. Jenkins. Committee. 



REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

Seventy-five years ago our fathers organized the Tar River Associa- 
tion for the purpose of carrying out the last command of our blessed 
Lord, '"Go ye into all the world and preacli the gospel to every 
creature." Our people have never lost sight of the object for which 
the Association was formed. Twenty-six years ago the Association 
undertook the larger things in the vv'ork of seeking and saving the lost, 
and while the v^'ork was confined to the destitution in our bounds, the 
regions beyond Avere not forgotten. But little, however, in comparison 
with what we ought to have done, has been done for the purpose of 
bringing the world to Christ. But surely now the time has come for 
enlargement. 

The large and inviting fields in China. Japan, Africa. Italy, Mexico, 
Brazil and Argentina call upon us to enlarge our gifts to Foreign Mis- 
sions. The heathen, as never before, are willing to hear the gospel. 
This fact places us under obligations to enlarge our gtfts to Foreign 
Missions. In this country there is one ordained preacher to every six 
hundred people. In China there is only one ordained missionary to 
nine hundi-ed thousand heathen. This terrible fact loudly calls upon 
us to enlarge our work in foreign lands. 

God has greatly blessed us in this work in the last ten years. In 
1895 we had 91 missionaries, in 190.5 we have 181 : then we had 85 
churches, now we have 194 ; then 22 church buildings, now 132 ; then 
1,503 Sunday School scholars, now 5,496: then 581 baptisms for the 
year, now 2,231 ; then after fifty years work 3,493 members, now 11,423. 
The Lord has greatly blessed our work and this progress calls upon 
us "to go forward." God points to the foreign field and says "go !" 
Surely we will not refuse to obey his command, but in loving 
obedience we will "go forward," by praying more for Foreign Mis- 
sions, and by giving more to God for the saving of the heathen. "Let 
us go up and possess the land for we are well able. " 

T. J. TAYLOR. 



Minutes of the Tar River Association. 11 

Hour for special order havino- arrived, Report on Foreign Mis- 
sions was read by Brother T. J. Taylor, which was followed by an able 
address from Brother E. E. Bomar, after which a resolution was pass- 
ed that the Association raise during- the year $1,500, for said object. 
The report was adopted. 



REPORT ON ASSOCIATTONAL MISSIONS. 

It has been twenty-eight years since your body took up theburdenof 
supplying- every part of your territory with the preaching of the gos- 
pel . At that time it was a great undertal^ing and apparently impossi- 
ble of accomplishment. But it was manifestly inspired from Above 
and through all the years the favor of the Lord has rested on it. We 
have come to understand that this has been the most important enter- 
prise entrusted to us. It has lain at the basis of every other cause. 
Foreign Missions, Education, the Orphanage, Sunday Schools. 
Periodicals have all prospered within our borders in proportion as we 
have bestowed vigorous and well directed labor on our vast home field. 

The year just closing has not been dill'erent from those which have 
gone before. There have been twenty-one men in different parts of the 
iield for longer or shorter periods. Owing to heavy and continuous 
rains during the time for protracted meetings, the season of harvest 
with the preacher, the ingathering has not been so great as it has 
sometimes been, but enough has been accon-iplished to show that our 
God has been in the worlc and with the workers. 

In the lower party of Beaufort County Elder Duncan McLeod has 
undertaken to build a house of worship at Aurora, an interesting and 
important station. The house is in a state of forwardness. 

In the town of Washington Elder Josiah Crudup has been the mis- 
sionary pastor for several years. How wisely and faithfully he has 
labored, only the records of the last day can show. His retirement 
froixi the field is a distinct loss to the whole Association. 

Elder ;M. L. Harris has been engaged as missionary pastor at seve- 
ral places in Edgecombe County. He has been with us just long- 
enough to make us regret that he must not stay longer. At Ebenezer, 
a new church, there has been a gracious revival and twelve persons or 
more have Vjeen baptized. At Crisp, where he has also been mission- 
ary pastor, there has been an excellent meeting and a number 
of baptisms. 

Elder M. P. Davis, missionary pastor, has labored earnsstly, cour- 
ageously and untiringly in Tarboro and not without good success. 
He goes from us to tha West Chowan Association and his removal will 
be sensibly felt in the sphere of his influence. 

Elder J. K. Henderson has given his time partly to Halifax County 
and partly to Edgecombe. His work has borne blessed fruit but it is 
not of the sort for a statistical table. 



12 Minutes of the Tar River Association. 

In Halifax Coui-ty there have been five men eng-ag'ed. Elder L. L. 
Morgan has operated in the region around Littleton. 

Elder J. T. Edmondson has been missionary pastor at Vaughn and 
the church has had growth during the year. 

Elder T. 3. Crutchfield is still missionary pastor at Roanoke Rapids 
and Rosemary. These are important towns and he is sowing seeds 
from which there must surely come a great and gracious harvest. 

Elder W. S. Brooke has been operating in the country around Scot- 
land Neck. It is his first year. 

Elder N. L. Gaskins has continued as missionary pastor at Halifax 
and also at Turkey Branch . 

In Martin County that godly and steady worker, Elder T.J. Crisp, 
has held two stations. At one of them he has organized a church and 
built a house of worship. 

Elder J. E. Hocutt was employed for a short time in Martin County 
and in Pitt. 

Elder A. G. Willeox was for a brief season at Robesonville. 

Elder J. K. Howell succeeds him at that place and also labors as 
missionary pastor at Cedar Branch. 

Elder J. T. Eubank is now engaged at promising places in the coun- 
ties of Martin and Pitt. 

In Nash County Elder J. AY. Sledge has been honoring his Master 
by patient and believing labor. 

In South Rocky Mount G. L. Merrell has been giving much time and 
well directed labor. It is probable that he will build a house in that 
important borough during the year. 

In Vance County Elder J. W. Downey was removed from prosper- 
ous labors at North Henderson by a call to Durham. 

Elder I.N. Loftin is still doing efficient labor at South Henderson. 

In /Wilson County Elder S. AV. Oldham has been engaged at Elm 
City and inviting points in the neighborhood 

Elder G. W. Coijpedge, veteran warrior, has been laboring on, the 
borders of this county. 

This rapid review of the field and the workers is full of inspiration. 
It reveals the presence and potency of Divine guidance and Heavenly 
power. Our watch-v»^ord and battle-cry should be that of the old Ger- 
man warrior as he lay prone on the field of strife, "Forward brutren, 
forward I" "Forgetting the things which are behind and reaching 
forth unto those v.'hich are before," let us press toward the mark for 
the complete conquest of our own beloved land for our dear Lord. 

Note — Brother John Sledgehaslaboredduringyear the lat Crocker's 
Chapel, where he feels the favor of the Lord has been upon his labors. 
At two school houses in Nash County and at one in Franklin County 
Elder A. G. Willeox has labored with the tokens of the Lord's favor 
upon him. 



Minutes of the Tar PavER Association. 



13 



Associational Missions was tb-e next object claimino- the attention of 

the body, and Brother Hufham read the report and addressed the body 

on the subject, after which the roll was called, and the following 

amounts pledged : 

amounts pledged. 



Scotland Neck 

Louisburg 

Rocky Mt 

Wilson 

Henderson 

North Rocky Mt 

Greenville 

Warrenton 

Weldon 

Brown's 

Washington 

Stony Creek 

Poplar Sp'gs 

Roanoke Rapids .... , 

Philadelphia , 

Tarboro , 

Williamston 

Dawson.s 

Bethel 

Littleton 

Maple Springs 

Red Oak 

New Bethel 

Spring Hope 

Tillery . . . ." 

Sharon 

Enfield 

Ebenezer 

L. M. S., Scotland N . 

Bear Swamp 

Rock Spring 

Rosemary 

Antioch 

Aurora 

Gary's Chapel 

Gastalia 

Cedar Branch 

Corinth 

Eagles 

Everetts 

Gethsemane 

Joyner's Chapel 

Macedonia 

Marmaduka 

Mildred 

Mt. Hebron 

Mountain Grove 

Oak Level 

Pactolus 

Peach Tree 

Pleasant Grove 

Plymouth 



.300.00 
150.00 
125.00 
125.00 
115.00 
100.00 
75.00 
To". 00 
60.00 
50.00 
50.00 
40.00 
40.00 
,37.50 
35.00 
35.00 
35.00 
30.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
15.00 
15.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.50 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
18.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
12.50 
15.00 
10.00 



Reedy Creek 10.00 

Stanhope 10.00 

Vaughns 10.00 

T. J. Taylor 10.00 

M. P, Davis 10.00 

O. L. Pitman 10.00 

L. M. S., Spring Hope. 5.00 

S. S. Williamston 5.00 

Mission Study Class . . . 5.00 

Sunbeams, Scotland N. . 5.00 

L. M. S., N'thR'ky Mt. . 5.00 

Weldon S. S 5.00 

W. M. S., Elm City.... 5.00 

Piney Grove 5.00 

Grover Hedgepeth 5.00 

Tarboro BaraccaClass. 5.00 

Infant Class, Greenv'e. 5.00 

Infant Class, N. R'ky Mt 5.00 

Nashville S. S 5.00 

Farmville M. Society .. 5.00 

So. Rockv Mt. . .• 5.00 

Afriend for Dr Hufham. . 5.00 

Littleton M. S 5.00 

S't'd N. Baracca Class. 5.00 

Mrs. O. L. Pitman 5.00 

J. L. Sledge 5.00 

J. H. Britt 5.00 

Stonv Creek S. S 5.00 

Afr'dforDr Hufham, pd. 5.00 

W. H. Ragsdale 5.00 

N. Biggs 5.00 

F. C. Ferguson, pd 5.00 

T. M. Arrington 5.00 

Mrs. G. A. Martin 5.00 

O. L. Pitman, ]xl 5.00 

T. S. Crutch field 5.00 

C. C. Williams, pd 5.00 

A. G. Willcox 5.00 

J. H. Thorpe 25.00 

N. Rocky Mt. S. S 2.5.00 

Cedar Rock 25.00 

Conoconary 20.00 

Cypress Chapel 20 00 

Elm City 20.00 

Gardner's 20.00 

Hamilton 20.00 

Macon 20.00 

Middleburg 20.00 

Mt. Zion 20.00 

Nashville 20.00 

Sandy Creek 22.00 

Warren Plains 20.00 



14 



Minutes of the Tar River Association. 



Battleboro 15.00 

Enterprise 15.00 

Ephesus 20.00 

Fishing- Creek 15.00 

Harriss Chapel 15.00 

Hickory.... 18.00 

Hobg-ood 15.00 

New^'Hope 15.00 

North Henderson 15.00 

Red Bud 15.00 

Samaria 15.00 

South Henderson 15.00 

A ladv 15.00 

A. G. Cox 10.00 

T. L. Vernon 10. 00 

W. M. S. Rocky Mt. . . . 10.00 

J. D. Larkin 10.00 

W. M. S., Warrenton.. 10.00 

L. M. S., Greenviile... 10.00 

J. D. Hufham. pd 10.00 

J. T. Eubanks 10.00 

J. G. Dukes, pd 10.00 

Speed 10.00 

Baracca C. N. R'kv Mt 10.00 

Rockv Alt. S. S 10.00 

Infant C, Scotland N. . 10.00 

W. E. Bowers, pd 10.00 

Ed Shear in 10.00 

Quankee 8.00 

Sulphur Springs 7.00 

Conoho 6.00 

Turkey Branch 6.00 

Bethlehem 5.00 

Elm Grove 5.00 



Crocker's Chapel 5.00 

Midway 7.00 

New Sandy Creek 5.00 

Social Plains 5.00 

\Y. M. S. , Hamilton 5.00 

Miss Z. A. Eagles, pd. . 5.00 

L. M. S , Hickory 5.00 

L. M. S.. Mapleville... 5.00 

W. W. Barnes 5.00 

L. M. S., Poplar Sp'gs. 5.00 

Roberson\ille 5.00 

T. A. Boon, pd 5.00 

Dr. Johnson 5.00 

Rockv Mt. Baracca C. 5.00 

G. A. Martin 4.00 

J. E. Askew 5.00 

B. F. Brigo-s 5.00 

Riddick's Grove 2.50 

J. E. Hocutt 2.50 

Peach Tree S. S 2.50 

CJradle Roll, Scotland N. 2.50 

Miss Bessie Strange... 2.00 

J. W. Robbins 3.00 

W. G. Edwards, pd . . . 2.00 

J. W. Smithwick. pd .. 1.00 

Henry Parker, pd 1.00 

A friend l.CO 

Cradle Roll, Littleton.. 1.00 

J. C. Wheless 1.00 

J. T. Jenkins 1.00 

T. E. Powell 1.00 

J. W. Anderson 1.00 

Total « 3002.50 



Adjourned. 

Wednesday, 2:.j0 o'clock. 

Association upon re-assembling was opened with prayer by Brother 
Williams. 

The following- report was otfered by Brother Lumpkin, which after 
remarks by Brother Lumpkin, was unanimously adopted : 

Whereas, a great destitution still prevails in our Association, and 
whereas, the demands after evangelistic work are so great that the pas- 
tors are not able to do all the work, therefore your committee recom- 
mends : 

First, That the Tar River Association shall employ an Asso- 
ciational evangelist at a salary of $1,000 and expenses. 

Second, That said evangelist shall be under the supervision of the 
Executive Board of the Association, and that he shall tttrn all money 
received for services over his expenses to said Board, which money 
shall be used to pay salary. 

Third, That a committee of three be appointed to secure at this 



MlXUTES OF THE TaR PaVER ASSOCIATION. 15 

Association ov as soon as possible individual pledges to meet the 
deficiency in his salary if there be any. 

Fourth, That the Executive Board be empowered to employ the suit- 
able man for the above work : G. T. Lumpkin. H. H. Mashburn. J. T. 
Jenkins. After which report on Associational Missions was adopted. 

The Committee on New Churches report that Speed Church, located 
at Speed, Edgecombe County, and Piney Grove, near Jamesville. in 
Martin County, send letters asking for membership in the Tar River 
Association. Your committee having examined covenant articles of 
faith of these churches find them regularly organized ]Missionary Bap- 
tist Churches ai\d recommend that they be received as members of this 

bodv. 

J. K. HOWELL. 

G. L. MERKELL, 
O. L. PITMAN. 

Committee. 



Churches received and delegates welcomed by ^Moderator. 
Report on Education was called for. and in absence of report, 
Brother Lumpkin, for Committee on Associational School, read the 
following report, which after being fully discussed by Brethren Lump- 
kin. Ragsdale. Lineberry, May, Davis and Hufham. was unanimously 
adopted : 

There has come to your committee a proposition from the trustees of 
AVinterville High School, Winterville. N. C. to adopt that school as 
one of our Associational schools, becoming one-half owner of the 
school, and having power to elect one-half of the trustees upon certain 
conditions named in the offer. 

Your committee recommends that a committee of three be appointed 
to consider more fully this proposition as to the terms and merits of 
the oifer, to bring to the attention of the churches of the Association, 
and to present a definite report with recommendations. _at the next 
meeting of the Tar River Association. 

G. T. LUMPKIN, 
IVEY ALLEN. 
J. W. RAGSDALE, 
R. D. CARROLL, 

Committee. 



Delegates to Southern Baptist Convention appointed T. J. Taylor, 
G. AV. ^lay, alternates. Delegates to Baptist State Convention ap- 
pointed T. M. x\rrington, J. D. Hufham. G. M. Duke. 

Chairman of Finance Committee ofl'ered his report, which was adopt- 
ed as follows : 



16 Minutes of the Tar River Association. 

Received for Associational Missions $2,073.62 

Received for State Missions 22. 88 

Received for Home Missions 18. 17 

Received for Foreign Missions 16.47 

Minute fund 87. 31 

Aged ministers 19.50 

Orphanage 50.34 

Education 26.15 

$2,314.44 
INDIVIDUALS. 

J. W. Sledge $ 5.00 

A. G. Willcox 10.00 

W. H. White 5.00 

Calhoun Griffin 5.00 

Miss Bessie Strange 1.00 

Mrs. Champion •. . 1.00 

Gro ver Hedgepeth 2. 50 

$ 29.50 29.50 

$ 2,343.94 
Adjourned. Prayer by Brotlier Mashburn. 

Wednesday night. 
The Association was led in prayer and praise service by Brother 
Barnes. 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

The object of the Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention is, to '"elicit, combine and direct the energies "of Southern Bap- 
tists into one united effort to evangelize our Southland, to develop the 
Baptist forces into efficient, intelligent church workers and to concen- 
trate our powers and means upon a more concerted and determined ef- 
fort to make the religion of Jesus Christ triumphant in the earth. 

The work is a colossal one and is as important as it is great. For 
upon its success or failure hangs the future of our denomination at 
home and abroad. If Home Missions can meet the demands of our 
Southern States in the next few years, then the purest doctrines of 
God's Word, the best representative of the New Testament church, the 
highest type of Christianity and the mightiest religious force of earth 
will be developed and established for the evangelization of the world. 
Here will be built up a mighty tower of Baptist influence and power 
which will contribute greatly to the consummation of the prophet's 
dream when '"the knowledge of the Lord shall cover the earth as the 
waters cover the deep." 

The necessity and importance of su3h a board is seen in the many 
sided problems of missionary endeavor in the South, the varied needs 
of different States and communities and the peculiar demands of these 
dift'erent problems. It happens that the largest fields of labor are lo- 



Minutes op" the Tar River Association. 17 

cated where Baptist forces are weaker, hence the demands are greatest 
where the supply is least. 

This unequal apportionment, effected by Nature and commercial in- 
terests, has begotten a divorcement of needs and supply and the neces- 
sity of a plan of adjustment of these is self-evident. 

The State Board cannot adjust these for it is bound by local inter- 
ests, and in not a few States, the demands are too great for the weak 
forces. Louisiana, for instance, with the greatest foreign population 
and city problem is the weakest of all the States. 

The Home Board is the only solution to the problem, for it is bound 
by no local interest ; it comes in touch with all the great problems and 
appeals to the wealth and strength of the entiire convention to assist 
in meeting the demands of these weaker fields. It possesses the power to 
concentrate the effort upon the phase of the work demanding immediate 
attention. 

The importance of the work is manifest. It conserves and enlarges 
the base of supply for world-wide endeavor. It enlarges the influence 
of the Baptists in the world, for the South is the Baptist stronghold. 
Here the world will look for the worth and purity of Baptist principles 
and polity. What we are and do in the South will give an estimate of 
what we are worth to the world. The Home Mission Board is an or- 
ganized effort to make Baptist principles triumphant and keep them 
pure at home. And what Baptists do for the South is a key to what 
they will do for the world. 

Again the success or failure in the work of evangelization of the 
South will determine the environment of our posterity. 

The Home Mission Board is a constant eft'ort to develop a pure un- 
adulterated Christianity for our sons and daughters. . The results of 
their past eft'ort fully justify the claims and commend its work to our 
consideration. 

At the convention in May, 1905, the report showed that 718 mission- 
aries were employed and wholly or partially supported, 88,016 ser- 
mons were preached, 10,551 conversions recorded, 219 churches insti- 
tuted, and 539 Sunday Schools organized, besides other work of visit- 
ing, tracts distributed, prayer meetings held, etc. 

In consideration of the importance of this work of the gracious 
blessings of God upon the work, and the unusual demands of the hour, 
your committee regrets to report so small an increase in offerings and 
laments the fact that such manifest indifference to so g'^eat a move 
exists in our Association, and recommends for the coming year : 

First, that our churches will give a larger place to Home Missions 
in our thought, our prayers and our benevolence. 

Secondly, That the pastors will preach on this work, secure sub- 
scribers to the "Home Field," distribute tracts and thus better inform 
the people as to the importance and work of the Home Board. 

Thirdly, That the Tar River Association during the Associational 



18 Minutes of the Tar River Association. 

year will endeavor to raise the sura of $1,000 for Home Missions. And 
that your committee on Home Missions will write bo each pastor of the 
Association presenting- the claims of Home Missions and calling atten- 
tion to this resolution. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. T. LUMPKIN, 

Committee. 
Report on Home Missions was read by Brother Lumpkin, who fol- 
lowed the report with a very able and inspiring address, after which 
the report was adopted. 

It was moved by Brother Ragsdale that our Moderator, T. M. Ar- 
rington, be made chairman of Committee on Associational School. 



REPORT ON ORPHANAGE. 

This has been a year of sore trials to our Orphanage. We had a 
terrible scourge of fever, and just as our children were about well, we 
had the misfortune to loose our barn and horses by fire. A little later 
the hail came and greatly damaged the crop. 

All of these things caused the General Manager to report a debt at 
the annual meeting. After the fever it was deemed wise and absolute- 
ly necessary to put in a complete system of sewerage, and it is now 
necessary to rebuild the barns. All of this will incur a debt of about 
$10,000. To meet this our churches and Sunday Schools are requested 
to make extra efforts during the coming year, and it is suggested that 
every church in the bounds of the Tar River Association hold a 
thanksgiving service and on that day a heroic effort be made to lift 
the debt. 

On the first day of September Brother Boone retired as General 
Manager after ten years of faithful service. The Baptist of the State 
owe to him a great deal. He was faithful, he planned well and wisely, 
and richly deserves the plaudit of "well done. " Brother M. L. Kesler 
(our own Kesler) was elected as Mr. Boone's successor. North Carolina 
has no truer man than Kesler. He is the right man. The trustees 
made no mistake in placing him at the head of our Orphanage. He 
needs your prayers as well as your contributions. In this hour of 
need let all the churches rally to our beloved Orphanage. 

THE AIMS OF THE ORPHANAGE. 

In the first place we try to provide as far as possible a real home 
for the Orphans. No one can take a mother's place, but we do the best 
that we can. We try to impress v;pon the child that we love him. In 
the next place we try to prepare the child for all the duties of life. We 
teach the child to be self-supporting and train him to be a help and 
honor to his State. The Orphanage is a home and a training school 
and is worthy of our hearty sup])ort. We have at the Orphanage 



Minutes of the Tar River Associatiox. 



19 



about 300 and this number will be increased to about 325 or 340. Last 
year's ininutes show that the churches and Sunday Schools gave 
$3,277.35, this year about $5,000. Can't we give $6,000 next year ? 

BRAXTON CRAIG, 

Committee. 

The report on Orphanage next claimed the attention of the Associa- 
tion and report was read by Brother Martin for Brother Craig, and 
after an address by Brother Martin, Brother Taylor addressed the 
Association and took a collection amounting to $232.73 in cash 
and pledges : 

T. M. Arrington.... $ 10 00 

N. Biggs 10 00 

T. J. Taylor 10 00 

Ruben Sanders, pd. 10 00 

Red Oak 10 00 

Brown's 10 00 

Spring Hope S. S. . . 10 00 

Tarboro 10 00 

T. W. Riddick. pd.. 10 00 

A. G. Willeox 10 00 

W. M. S.. Warrenton 10 00 

New Bethel 10 00 

Stanhoue 5 00 

W. \V. Barnes 5 00 

W. M. Warren, pd.. 5 00 

J. D. Larkins, pd. . 5 00 

Adjourned. Prayer by Brother Hufham. 

Thursday, 10 o'clock. 
The Association met and led in praise sei vice by Brother Craig. 
Minutes read and approved. Special order being Education. 



O. L. Pitman, pd. . . . 


5 00 


R. C. Josev, pd 


5 00 


Mrs.C. J. Austin, pd. 


5 00 


W.M. S.,^. R'kvMt. 


5 00 


Fishing Creek 


5 no 


Pleasant Grove 


5 00 


Mrs. F. C. Ferguson 


5 00 


Battleboro 


5 05 


Weldon S. S.- 


5 00 


T. A. Boone, pd 


5 00 


AVilson 


5 00 


Warren Plains 


5 00 


Mrs. John Allen, pd 


4 50 


Cash 


50 




$ 205 00 



REPORT ON EDUCATION 



One cannot fail to observe that there is sweeping over our country a 
new wave of enthusiasm for higher education. Rockefeller's recent 
gift of ten million dollars to the General Education Board is only 
characteristic of the great awakening on the subject of higher educa- 
tion. Baptists every whei'e are sharing largelj- in this awakening. Our 
Baptist brethren at the North are now engaged in raising a special 
fund of five hundred thousand dollars for the equipment and endow- 
ment of native schools on Foreign Mission fields. The Baptists of the 
South are everywhere realizing as never before the need of a forward 
movement in education, and especially in education under Baptist au- 
spices. More and more the conviction is deepening that, apart from 
higher education, Christianity cannot be vigorous and aggressive. 
More and more are we realizing that, if Baptists are to lead the hosts 
of God, they must lead also in education. 

Baptists of North Carolina are justly proud of their schools. We 



20 Minutes of the Tar River Association. 

boast of Wake Forest College, of the Baptist University for Women, 
of Chowan Baptist Female Institute, of Oxford Seminary, and of a 
score of Baptist academies and high schools, which are doing invalu- 
able service for the denomination in our State. 

But your committee would respectfully point out three great needs 
that confront North Carolina Baptists in their work of education : 

1. A more thorough system of Baptist high schools and academies, 
which shall lay hold of Baptist boys and girls, and shall serve as 
stepping stones to our Baptist colleges. Baptists cannot afford to 
surrender this important work to the Graded Schools, for they tend to 
turn the eyes of our young people, not toward our Baptist colleges, 
but rather toward the State schools. In order to keep our young peo- 
ple loyal to the Baptist faith, they must be brought up in Baptist 
schools. 

2. Denominational ownership and control of our Baptist schools: 
Hitherto we have left the great work of Baptist education to individu- 
als here and there. As a rule these individuals have done noble work, 
and we honor them. But we cannot overlook the fact that private cap- 
ital is usually inadequate to build and equip such schools as are 
worthy to the Baptist denomination. Moreover, such schools have 
seldom been permanent. Private schools, therefore, can never com- 
mand the full confidence, nor secure the adequate support of the denom- 
ination. Your committee therefore looks with great favor on the prop- 
osition to bring the Winterviile High School under the protecting 
wings of the Association. It does not meet the needs of the whole of 
our great Association, but it is a step in the right direction. 

3. The affiliation of Baptist schools into a system that will recog- 
nize and conserve their comrnon interests: This seems to be the great- 
est need. We should have not only a chain of denominational acad- 
emies under denominational control, but their courses of study should 
be definitely adjusted to fit into the curricula of our Baptist colleges. 
Steps should be taken, therefore, to bring the Baptist schools of our 
Association and of the whole State into such a related system as will 
secure some uniformity in their aims and methods of work, will tend to 
do away with destructive competition, and will invite more largely the 
confidence and support of the Baptist people throughout the State. 

Such a scheme is not fanciful, but is in line with the policy pursued 
by the Baptists in other States. 

Your committee, therefore, recommends accordingly : 

1. That our Association, for the present, lend its moral support to 
the erection and equipment of Baptist schools within its bounds. 

2. That it take steps to bring one or more of such schools under its 
ownership and control. 

3. That it invite the State Convention to take under consideration 
the matter of affiliating the Baptist schools of the State into a system. 

S. L. MORGAN. 



MiXUTES OF THE TAR PiIVER ASSOCIATION. 21 

Brother S. L. Morg'an read report and after being- discussed by 
Brethren Morgan, Hufham, Craig- and Davis the report was adopted. 

Executive Committee for next year was appointed as follo-,vs : 
N. Bigo-s. E. W. Shearin. F. C. Ferguson. W. H. Ragsdale, T. M. 
Arrington, O. L. Pitman, T. B. Wilder and B. F. Briggs. By special 
motion the Moderator, T. M. Arrington, was added.! 

Committee to raise money for Associational evangelist : G. T. 
Lumpkin, J. T. Jenl;:ins and T. J. Taylor. 

Committee to report on yjroposition from Winterville High School to 
next session of the Association : T. M. Arrington, G. M. Duke and 6. 

T. Lumpkin. __.„_________ ._ 

REPORT ON AGED MINISTERS. 

We note with a great deal of sadness the insufficient provision the 
Baptists of North Carolina are inaking for their aged Ministers. 

While there may be some progress in the contributions to this cause 
yet at this rate of progress it will take years to put the Board in a po- 
sition to give more than a mere pittance to these soldiers of the Cross, 
who hava given their lives to the Baptist cause of North Carolina. 

To neglect the aged Ministers is a gross ingratitude and ingratitude 
is the character theft of any institution. 

Brethren increase your contributions to this great cause. 

We recommend that all churches take a collection for this object 

during December. 

Respectfully submitted, 

' J. D. LARKIN. 

Report on aged ?»Iinisters was read by Brother Davis for Brother 
Larkin. and after a most appropriate tall<; from Brother Hufham, the 
report was adopted. 

It was moved by Brother Wilder that the Clerk add to the Minutes, 
the dates, time of meeting, place, etc., of the Association from its or- 
ganization to date. Carried. 



REPORT ON WO.MAN'S WORK. 

During the past year the Woman's Work has been very successful. 
By their excellent labors, coupled with the spirit of self-sacrifice and 
devotion to duty the women of the Tar River Association have made 
this one of the best years in the history of their organizations. The 
report shows progress along every line of work. Contributions are 
larger than they were last year, and the societies feel encouraged to 
know that Baptist women are becoming more deeply and widely inter- 
ested in the work of the organizations. 

But not being satisfied with the present achievements, believing that 
the work has just begun, the societies propose to do much more next 
year than they have done heretofore. To this end they have adopted 
the followitTo- plan : 

1. A systematic effort to form JMissionary Societies in every chuixh. 



22 



Minutes op the Tar River Association. 



(a. ) Ask the pastors to help to create a missionary atmosphere. 

(b. ) Appoint a committee consisting- of one lady from each Union 
to assist the Vice President in visiting' the churches for the purpose of 
organizing Societies. 

2. The Seci'etary of Auxiliary shall each year, after the Association, 
be requested to send names and addresses of all Missionary Societies 
in the Association to the Corresponding Secretary of each Board (Drs. 
Grey, Willingham and Livingston Johnson) so that we may keep in 
touch with the different Boards and that they may send literature to 
such Societies. 

3. That concerted eiTort be made to develop a missionary intelli- 
gence and enthusiasm in the whole Association. 

4. That each Union be requested to have a Woman's Auxiliary in 
connection with the Union. 

5. That the Woman's Auxiliary request the Association to give us 
tvFO pages in the Minutes for a full report of our work. 

6. That each Society be urged to send delegates to the annual meet- 
ing in December at Raleigh. Each Society being entitled to one dele- 
gate to be entertained. (Instruct delegates as to how to vote about 
change of time for annual meeting. ) 

7. That the Societies of this Association pledge themselves to raise 
$1,200 for the next Convention vear. 

JOHN E. AYSCUE. 

Brother Ayscue read the report on Woman's Work and after an ad- 
dress by said Brother the report was adopted. A statistical report 
shows their work for the vear : 



WOMEN'S WORK— Statistical Report. 



SOCIETIES OF THE 
CHUECHES 


il 5 




■r. 


"Z, "r. 
•X '^ 

< 


il 


X 

r— X 

< i 


■r. y 


'X 

1.2 


CO 

c 





Greenville ^V. M. S ... 


2-2 10 
1 5(1 
7 90 
4 4:2 
4 20 
li 06 
4 00 


26 00 
2 78 
9 21 
.3 70 
1 90 
9 45 

14 50 


31 15 












111 90 


191 15 


Hickurv ^Y M S 


1 3S 












5 66 


Littleton W jNI R 


3 12 

4 35 
2 20 
7 05 
7 00 














20 23 


Alaple Spring's 


5 00 
5 00 












17 47 














13 30 


Poplar Springs 












23 16 






5 00 










30 50 


Rorkv Mount 
















Rock.v Mount W M S. . . . 
i;uc-kv Mount Y W MS.. 


2o 00 

r 00 














52 00 


'si '66 


77 00 














38 00 


( )ak Level 






. .1 






6 50 


Scotland Neck W MS.... 
Scotland Neck Y AV M S. 
Scotland Neck Sunljeam 


52 20 
5 50 

37 27 
(i 80 
2 3ft 
4 72 
4 75 

10 25 

11 75 


37 93 
2 00 
9 00 
7 40 
4 IS 
2 25 

'26" 66 
20 55 


9 70 

4 15 

5 00 
3 56 

"i S5 
19 5C 
11 70 


13 50 

7 5t 




10 15 


161 71 


260 00 
2 79 


545 19 
23 94 
51 27 


Tarboro M' 51 S 


2 60 
2 35 






1 




20 30 


Tarboro Y W M S . .. 






1 




9 42 


















Warren Plains W M S. . . 














6 60 


Warrenton \V iSI S 

Washington W M S 


6 55 








100 00 


1 00 

2 50 


150 75 • 
54 05 


Washinjiton Sunbeams.. 










7 57 


Wilson W M S 


18 10 


20 20 

191 65 


2 55 
121 2b 


10 00 
53 50 








50 1^1 

mz 71 


1 00 
410 19 


101 95 


Total 


5 01 


10 15 




1401 53 









]MlNUTES OF THE TaR RlVER ASSOCIATION. 23 

Treasurer of Executive Committee and of the Association offered tlieir 
reports, which after being- audited by Brother Wilder, were adopted. 
The Tar River Association in Account With Noah Biggs, 

Treasurer. 

To cash paid Rev. B. Craig $ 10 00 

To casli paid Rev. J. E. Hudson 25 00 

To casli paid Rev. S. W. Oldham 350 00 

To cash paid Rev. G. W. Coppedo-e 40 00 

To cash pa id Rev. J. W. Sledge 40 oO 

To cash paid Rev. T. J. Crisi> 125 00 

To cash paid Rev. J. K. Howell 65 00 

To cash paid Rev. J. K. Hendei'son 250 00 

To cash paid Rev. M. L. Harris 320 76 

To cash paid Rev. J. T. EubanlvS 133 00 

To cash paid Rev. J. T. Edroondson 100 00 

To cash paid Rev,* W. Y. Brooks 200 00 

To cash paid Rev. A. G. Wilcox 81 00 

To cash paid Rev. R. D. Haymore 16 00 

To cash paid Rev. C. G. Lowe ... 12 50 

To cash paid Rev. J. E. Hocutt 41 25 

To cash paid Rev. Duncan McLeod 50 00 

To cash paid Rev. T. L. Verner 541 60 

Credits. $ 1,913 67 

By cash on hand last Association $ 210 26 

By cash from the Association -. . . . 2,051 97 

$ 2,262 23 

By cash of Pactolus 750 

By cabh of New Hope .330 

By cash of Elm City 455 

$ 2,277 78 
1.913 66 

By cash on h a nd '• $ 364 11 

Examined and approved October 4, 1905. 

THOMAS B. WILDER, Auditor. 
Tar River Association in Account With A. G. Willcox. 
October, 1904. 

To balance due Association $ 1 37 

Received of Finance Committee for Foreign Missions 134 17 

Received of Finance Committee for Home Missions 22 06 

Received of Finance Committee for State Missions 26 83 

Received of Finance Committee for Education 56 21 

Received of Finance Committee for Orphanage 91 86 

Received of Finance Committee for Aged Ministers 28 98 

Received of Finance Com. for Sunday School andcolportage. . 2 00 

Received of Finance Committee for Minutes 94 00 

Casli collection for Orphanage ... 101 73 

Casli collection for churches in Martin County 25 50 

Cash collection for B. Cade 8 16 

Received of Mildred for Associational Missions 5 00 

Received of Mildred for Minutes 1 00 

Cash for Associational Missions 1 00 

Total $ 599 87 



24 Minutes of the Tar River Association. 

Contra. 

By am't pd. Walters Durbaix) for Foreign Missions 

Amount paid Walters Durham for Home Missions 

Amount paid Walters Durham for State Missions 

Amount paid Walters Durham for Education 

Paid Walters Durham for Orphanage 

Paid Walters Durham for Aged Ministers 

Paid Walters Durham for Sunday Schools and colportage. 
By am't pd. Arch Johnson, cash collection, Orphanage.... 

Amount paid B. Craig for churches in Martin County 

Amount paid B. Cade for Murphy school 

Amount paid Jesse Herbext for Minutes 

Amount paid W. Biggs for Assn'l Missions, Ivlildred 

Paid W. Biggs, cash for Associational Missions 

Clerk's fee 

Blank church letters, etc 

Expenses, postage, on manuscript . . . , 



$ 134 16 


22 06 


26 83 


56 21 


9186 


28 98 


2 00 


101 73 


25 50 


8 16 


67 50 


5 00 


1 00 


25 00 


115 


2 50 



$ 599 65 
A. G. WILLCOX. 



To balance due Association, this day 

Piespectfully submitted, 

October, 1905. 
Examined and approved October 4. 1905. 
THOMAS B. WILDER, Auditor. 

The Clerk was instructed to have Minutes printed and receive 
usual compensation. 

Committee on Digest of Church Letters oiTered his report, which 
was adopted. 

A motion was made and carried that Brother Duke receive help to 
get history of Association if need be. 

Brother Lumpkin offered the following report, which was adopted by 
a rising vote : 

Whereas. God has greatly blessed this session of the Tar River As- 
sociation. 

Whereas, The splendid evidences of growth make our hearts glad, and 

Whereas, The members of the Tarboro church and the good people 
of this town have opened to us their hearts and homes and have enter- 
tained us with such magnificent hospitality and thoughtfulness. 
Therefore be it 

Resolved. First, That we give praise and gratitude to God for His 
goodness and blessings. 

Secondly, That we extend a unanimous vote of thanks to the pastor 
and members of the Tarboro church and to the good people of this 
community for their hospitality. 

"Blest Be The Tie That Binds" was sung after which the Moderator 
declared the Association adjourned to meet with church at Red Oak, 
Nash County, on Tuesday after first Sunday in October, 1906, at 11 
o'clock. 

Praver bv Brother Hufham. 

T. M. ARRINGTON, 
A. G. W^ILLCOX, Moderator. 

Clerk and Treasurer. 



MINUTE.S OF THK TaR RlVJCK AS.S()C'IAT10X. 
DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS. 



CHURCH 
Ant ioch 




T- 

— 2 
59 


a; 


■j: ; 
CO ' 
Oj 

3 
Q 1 

6 


(•;(; 45 


a; 

5 ^ 

4.. 

04 00 




T. 
••> 


45 


Aurora 




74 




Battleboro 

Beai* Swamp 


45 

1()7 

4.'] 

(37 

136 

(>1 

90 

132 

192 

49 

28 

185 

1.3 

131 

141 

20 

14 

SI 

120 

.Ki 

110 

07 


49 

172 
37 
67 

127 
()2 
87 

129 

192 
56 
28 

185 
18 

125 

146 
35 
30 


4 

5 




90 IS 

32 50 
156 67 

71 22 
300 56 

98 37 

118 .50 

1 00 

132 (il 

161 76 

43 90 


112 90: 

23 65| 

134 39 


•>o 


8 
20 


8.5 


Bethel 


6 


■^s 


Bethlehem 






Browns 

Cary 's Chapel. . . 
Castalia 


"i 


. 9 

"".3 
3 


.308 71; 

94 77I 
115 80 


8 


15 


'"ii 


()0 




70 


Cedar Branch.. . . 
Cedai" Rock 


23 70| 
"147' 50: 


22 


70 




Conocanary 

Conoh<j . . . 


1 




26 


('orinth 






205 85 
4 00 

128 70 
198 67 
112 70 
771 (.0 
lo2!i 41 

343 34 

70 00 

141 4K 


225 85i 

23 40 

128 88- 

276 14 

111 12 

139 36' 

599 (>5 

51 00 

;!5 .50 

148 .35 

114 0(> 


20 00 

19 40 

18 

77 47 




Crocker's Chapel 
(Jy press CI] a pel. . 
Dawsons 


3 

5 
15 
16 


(i 
. . . . 






"1 

631 

429 

6 

307 




Kayles 

Elienezer 


58 
64 


Elm ' 'itv 


78 
118 




70 


I'jlm G ro vt-' 






•>5 


Enlield 


(i2 

110 

99' 2 


-0 


35 


84 


Ei)hesus 

Eve'^etts 




1 1 


40 






FishinjJ' Creek . . . 

Gardeners 

Gethsemane 

Greenville 


70 

1 r,:, 

42 

Ki!) 



los 

42 
171 



12S 

14:5 

VI3 

.55 

102 

121 

201 

92 

7! 

191 

56 

t)0 

62 

33 


'"i3 
•1 


1 


123 62 

337 ()7 

76 52 

2077 80 

12 45 

141. 50 

1924 31 

151 66 

297 22 

53 ()0 

19.S ,",(i 

.■).-)2 18 

1497 0( 

86 10 
21 '5 40 
530 00 
143 83 
185 38 
4 40 

60 00 

88 10 
167 00 


113 97 

39(; 24 

1.58 44 

2106 59 


58 
81 
28 


• ) 1 
92 
79 


9 65 


Halifax ... . 




Hamilton 


47 

11 

4 

7 

12 

"2." 

!) 
"29 


2 

.) 
8 

() 


251 17 

1()5 55 

17.55 58 

170 57 

56 89 

(53 20 

34 50 

1119 03 

1500 00 

95 47 
210 04 
220 00 

96 25 

"440 41 


251 17 

24 05 

"'l8'84 

9 " (';o 

.566 85 
3 0( 
9 ;57 



"436'oi 


' ' 240 




Harriss Chaiiel . . 

Henderson 

Hickory 

Hoby-ood 

John's Chapel . . . 
Joyner's Chaiiel . 
Littleton . . . 


117 

13!) 
8() 

.■{^ 

43 

102 

120 

209 

()7 

19b 
47 
(iO 
33 
.3.3 
04 

148 


73 


164 


06 


Eouisburg- 




Macedonia 

Maeoji 

Ma])]e Sprinys. . . 

Marmaduke 

Middleburg 

Midway 


i'.lO 
47 


06 

58 


Mildred 




Mountain Grove. 


80 
158 


16 
10 




65 00 
7 20 




23 

1 159 


10 


Mount Hebron . . . 




80 



2() 



.Minutes of the Tar River Association. 



DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS-Concluded. 



Mount Zion 


160 
32 


160 
30 






151 74 
114 00 


154 13 

309 68 


2 39 
195 68 




Nashville 




2 




New Bethel 


174 


157 




17 


322 72 


458 87 


136 15 




New Hope 


70 


80 


io 




95 80 


217 75 


111 95 




New Sandv Creek 


70 
107 


65 
117 


"in 


5 


106 35 
249 24 


72 79 




33 56 


North Hender.-.on 


396 67 


147 43 




N. Rocky Mount. 


139 


148 


9 




666 94 


808 59 


141 65 




(^ak Level 


60 


56 


.... 


4 


109 39 


99 53 




9 86 


Pactolus 








Peach Tree 


189 


i79 




10 


136 68 


165 28 


28 60 




Philadelphia 


214 


200 




14 


131 21 


137 00 


5 79 




Piney Grove 




119 








800 50 
14:'. 30 


800 50 
10 66 




Pleasant Grove. . 


141 




Or) 


132 64 




Plymouth 


05 
384 


05 

369 






336 06 
7 "^9 06 


437 35 






Poplar Springs. . 
Quankee 




15 


•?91 71 




57 

209 

83 

178 


57 
48 

"3 






6 25 

83 00 

334 45 

176 08 


6 25 

"i28'6o 

30 07 




Red Bud 


161 
115 
175 


"32 


119 90 
205 85 
146 01 


36 90 


Red Oak 




Reedv Creek 




Riddick's Grove. 


16 
125 


16 
125 






2 25 








Roanoke Rapids. 


727 86 


828 07 


ioo 21 




Robersonville . . . 


11 


11 






51 00 


90 00 


39 00 




Rock Spring- . . . . 
Rockv Mount 


130 


118 




]^0 


202 81 


224 85 


1 22 04 




270 


303 


33 




2237 42 


2510 07 


272 f.5 




Rosemary 


53 


69 


16 




204 11 


225 54 


21 43 




Samaria 


251 


298 


47 




228 89 


160 90 




07 99 


Sandv Creek 


279 


304 


25 




154 54 


41 28 




113 26 


Scotland Neck. . . 


364 


376 


12 




3894 83 


3989 17 


94 34 




Sharon 


167 


152 




i5 


373 05 


442 79 


69 74 






53 
91 


73 
94 


20 
3 




49 07 
102 55 


96 82 
215 00 


47 75 




South Henderson 


112 45 




Speeds 

Spring- Hope 




16 


16 






792 69 


792 69 




47 


48 


1 




146 28 


433 81 


287 53 




Stanhope 


45 


51 


() 




87 56 


114 00 
500 08 


26 44 




Stonv Creek . . . . 


162 


172 


10 




336 57 


163 51 




Sulphur Springs. 


74 


94 


20 




102 97 


143 88 


40 91 




Tarboro 


174 


185 


11 




736 35 


844 46 


110 11 




Tillerv 


32 


37 


.) 




267 06 


226 72 




40 .34 


Turke-^' Branch. . 


24 


29 


.) 




40 84 


32 39 




8 45 




61 


(il 






77 00 








Warren Plains . . 


134 


151 


17 




188 38 


298 08 


109 70 




Warrenton 


162 


17S 


16 




1107 80 


2532 43 


1424 63 




Washingttjn 


120 


117 







1165 81 


1148 26 





i7 55 


Weldon 


90 


136 


46 




2317 50 


200() 35 




211 15 


Willi amston .... 


99 


104 


;) 




710 02 


901 10 


191 08 






.300 
9660 


342 
10206 


42 

757 


211 


1278 13 
30952 57 


5485 (il 
37850 64 


4207 08 




Totals 






Last year 87 churches i-eported 9660 members. This year 48 chur- 
ches report a gain of 7.36 members. Four new churches report a mem- 
bership of 21. 2(i ch lurches report a loss of 211 members. 9 churches 
which rei>orted last year failed to hand in any letter. 6 churches re- 
port same as last year. We have a net gain this year of. 546. making 
a lotal membershi]^ of 1020(i. .'! churches have failed to r-epor-t for t\\-(> 



Minutes of the Tar River Association. 27 

years. These churches, when last reported, had a membership of 64, 
which would increase our total to 10270. 

31 churches reported a decrease in contributions of -$3314.17 12 
churches failed to report any contributions. 49 churchrs reported a 
gain in contribution of $10126.98. 2 new churches reported a contribu- 
tion of $1592.69, making a gain over last year of $6898.07, and making 
a grand total to all objects of $37850.64. 

We have in the Association, 94 churches. 

B. CRAIG. ) 

T. S. CRUTCHFIELD U'ommittee. 

R. \V. JOHNSON 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION— Times and Places of Meeting. 

1. Sandy Creek, Franklin County, commencing on fourth Sunday 
in October.' 1831. 

2. Maple Spring, Franklin County, commencing on Tliursday be- 
fore fourth Sunday in October, 1832. 

3. Hickory Chapel, Nash County, Thursday before fourth Sunday 
in October, 1833. 

4. Brown's, Warren 3ounty. Saturday before fourth Sunday in 
October, 1834. 

5. Red Bud. Franklin Countv, Fridav l:)efore fourth Sundav in 
October, 1835. 

(i. Shiloh, Franklin County, 23-25th of October, 1836. 

7. Peach Tree. Nash C'ounty, Saturday before fourth Sunday in 
October. 1837. 

8. Reedy (^''reek. Warren County. Friday before fourth Sundav in 
October, 1838. 

9. Plat Rock. Franklin Countv. Saturdav before fourth Sundav in 
October, 1839. 

10. Bear Swamp. Halifax C'ountv. Saturdav before fourth Sundav 
in October, 1840. 

11. Louisburg, Saturday before first Sunday in October. 1841. 

12. Gardner's, Warren County, October, 1842. 

13. Poplar Spring, Franklin Countv. Fridav befoi-e first Sundav in 
October, 1843. 

14. Brown's. Warren Countv, Saturdav before first Sundav in 
October, 1844. 

15. Maple Spring. Franklin County. Saturday before first Sunday 
in October, 1845. 

16. Sandy Creek, Franklin County. 2-4th of October, 1846. 

17. Enon, Warren Countv, Fridav before first Sundav in October, 
1847. ' " ■ 

18. Hickory, Nasli County, Friday before first Sunday in October, 
1848. 

19. Haywood's, (now Corinth) I''rankliii ('ounty. Friday before first 
Sundav in October. 1849. 



28 Minutes of the Tar Kiver Association. 

20. Red Bud. Franklin Countv, Friday after first Sunday in Octo- 
ber. 1850. 

21. Warrenton, Friday befoi^e first Sunday in October. 1851. 

22. Flat Rock, Franklin County. Friday before first Sunday in 
October, 1852. 

23. Peach Tree. Nash County, Friday before fourth Sunday in Au- 
gust, 1853. 

24. Reedy Creek. Warren County, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
August, 1854. 

25. Perry's Chapel, Franklin County. Friday before fourth Sunday 
in August, 1855. 

26. Salem. Wilson County, Friday before fourth Sunday in Au- 
gust, 1856. 

27. Gardner's. Warren County, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
August, 1857. 

28. Poplar Spring, Franklin County, Friday after third Sunday in 
Augu:;t, 1858. 

29. Sharon, Warren County. Friday before fourth Sunday in Au- 
gusi,, 1859. 

30. Franklinton. Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 1860. 

31. Maple Spring, Franklin County, Friday before fourth Sunday 
in August, 1861. 

32. Brown's, Warren County, Fridav before fourth Sundav in Au- 
gust, 1862. 

33. Red Bud. Franklin County, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
August. 1863. 

34. Minutes for 1864 lost in consequence at the confusions of the 
Civil War. 

35. Hickory Chapel, Nash County, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
.September, 1865. 

36. Bear Swamp. Nash County, Frid&y after first Sunday in Octo- 
ber. 1866. 

:J7. Cypress Chapel. Franklin County, Friday before first Sunday 
in October, 1867. 

38. Red Oak. Nash County. Friday before first Sunday in October, 
1868. 

39. Sharon. Warren County, Friday after fourth Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1869. 

40. Poplar Spring. Franklin <"ounty. '^I'hursday before hrst Sunday 
in October, 1870. 

41. Haywood's, ( now Corinth ) Franklin County, Thursday before 
first Sunday in October, 1871. 

42. Sandy Creek. Franklin County. Thursday before first .Sunday 
in October. 1872. 

43. Wilson. Fi'iday before lirst Sunday in October, 1873. 

44. Philadelphia, Nash County, October l-3rd, 1874. 

45. Reedy Ci-eek, Warren Countv, Thursday before first Sunday in 
October, 1875. 

46. Henderson. Septem.ber 28-.30th. 1876. 

47. Pleasant Grove, Nash County, October 4-6th, 1877. 

48. Conoconary. Halifax Countv. October 10-12th. 1878. 



Minutes of thk Tar River Association. 2i) 

49. Louisburg-, October 9-12Lh, 1S7P. 

r>0. Peach Tree, Nash County, October 6-8th. 1880. 

51. Antioch. Halifax County, 1881. 

52. Littleton. October 5-7th, 1S82. 

53. Iioek Spring'. Fi'anlclin County. October ll-i;>th, 1SS;5, 

54. Mount Zion, Franlclin County, October 9-llth. 1884. 

55. Wilson, October S- inth, 1885. 

56. Brown's, Warren County, October 7-9th. 188(5. 

57. Samaria, Nash County, October 4-6th, 1887. 

58. Maple Spring. Franklin County, October ll-l.')th. 1888. 

59. Gardner's. Warren County. October 10-12th, 1889. 
(iO. Greenville, October 9-llth. 1890. 

()1. AVarreuton. October 8-lOth. 1891. 

62. Louisburg, October 5~7th, 1892. 

63. Philadelphia. October 5-7th. 1893. 

64. Scotland Neck. October ll-13th. 1894. 

65. Wilson. October 9-llth. 1895. 

66. Po))lar Springs, Octobar 7-9th, 189(i. 

67. Stoney Creek, October 5-7th, 1S97. 

68. Welclon. October 4-6th, 189S. 

69. Warren Plains, October .3-5th, 1899. 

70. Spring. Hope, October 16-18th, 1900. 

71. Corinth, October 8-lOth, 1901. 

72. Washington, October 6-8th, 1902. 

73. llocky Mount, October (i-8th. 1903. 

74. Maple Springs, October 4-(ith, 1904. 

75. Tarboro. October ;i-5th. 1905. 



■ RULES OF 13Ecori::m. 

Believing it best to be governed by certain rules and regulations in 
conducting the business of this Association, we adopt the following : 

1. The As.sociation shall be opened and closed with prayer. 

2. Not more than one person shall speak at a time, who shall rise 
from his seat and address the Moderator. 

3. The person thus speaking shall not be interrupted, unless he vio- 
lates some rule of decorum. 

4. The p;erson. speaiving shall adhere sti'ictly to the subject, and in 
nowise reflect on any other brothei'. 

5. No brother shall atisent himseit from the Association without ob- 
taining permission from the body. 

6. No brother shall s]ieak mcu'e than twice on tlie same subject 
without unanimous consent. 

7. No pers'jn shall whisper while a brother is speaking-. 

8. The names of the delegates shall be enrolled by the Clerk, and 
called as often as the Association requires. 



30 Minutes of the Tak Rivek Associattox. 

y. The Alociei-'ator may give his ideas on any subject before putting 
it to the vote, but is entitled to vote onlj'- in case of a tie. 

10. An order of business shall be made at the beg-inning of each ses- 
sion, and shall be changed only by vote of the body. 



COISTSTITUTIOISr. 

1. The Association shall be composed of the pastors and of the mem- 
bers chosen by the churches v.'ho shall produce letters certifying their 
appointment. Members thus chosen and convened, together with the 
pastors, shall be denominated The Tar River Baptist Association, 
which shall have no power over the churches, nor shall it infringe on 
any of their rights. 

2. The letters from the churches shall contain the number then in 
fellowship and those baptized, received by letter, dismissed, excluded 
and died since last Association. 

3. The officers of the Association, shall be a Moderator, Clerk, 
Treasurer and Historian, who shall be chosen by the suffrages of the 
members present. 

4. Other churches, upon petition by letter and by delegates, and 
after a satisfactory examination of their Articles of Faith, may be ad- 
mitted to the body by a unanimous vote, when the Moderator shall 
give to their delegates the right hand of fellowship. 

5. Every church in this Association is entitled to one representa- 
tive, but no church more than three. 

<i. Every motion made and seconded shall be left to the discreiion 
tion of the Association whether it shall be debated or not. 

7. The Association shall endeavor to furnish the churches wiiii 
copies cf its Minutes. 

8. The Minutes of the Association shall be read and approved, and 
shall be signed by the Moderator and Clerk before the Association ad- 
journs. 

9. Any church not representing itself in this body for three succes- 
sive sessions, by letter or delegates, shall be stricken from the roll of 
the churches, unless satisfactory reasons are assigned. 

10. The Association shall withdraw fellowship from any church 
which shall be found disorderly in faith or practice. 

11. A'isiting brethren from sister churches, or similar bodies, may 
])e invited to participate in our deliberations. 

V2. At each session of the Association delegates to the Baptist State 
Convention and to the Southern Baptist Convention shall be chosen 
by vote. 

13. This Constitution is subject to alteration by a majority vote of 
the delegates enrolled at any session. 

14. The business of the Association shall be conducted according 
to Mell's Parliamentarv Practice. 






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MINUTES 



Seventy-Sixth Annual Session 



HELD WITH THE CHURCH AT 

Red Oak, Nash County, N. C, 

October 9, tOand U, 1906. 



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i 



The next iSes&^ion to be held with the church in Henderson, beginning on 
Monday night after tlie ti'St i^unday in October 1907. To preach Introductory 
sermon, Rev. G. W. May, Alternate, Rev. J. T. Jenkins. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: 



N. Biggs, E. \V. Shearin, F. C. Ferguson, O. L. L'ittnian, F. C. Ellen, T. M. J 
Arrington. 



f 
h- 

OFFICERS: 
f T. M. ARRINGTON, Moderator, 

A. G. WILCOX, Clerk and Treasurer, 



ROCKY MT. 1 
BRINKLEYVILLE. 4 



QOr^DSBORO, N. 0. 
NASH BROS., FKIN'TERS AND BfXnKRS, 
IflOe. 

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i Kiiillliiiiiii'alii I I. ilih ■iiijl ;ii-iidiliiiiiiiiiIliiii»Fj 



Seventy-Sixth Annual Session 






li 



HELD WITH THE CHURCH AT 



County, N. C, 

October 9, 10 and U, 1906. 



The next Session to be held with the church in Henderson, beginning on 
Monday night after the fi-'St Sunda.v in October 1907. To preach Introductory 
sermon, Rev. Gr. W. May, Alternat(\ Rev. J. T. Jenkins. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: 

N. Bigg.?, E. W. Shearin, F. C. Ferguson, O. L. Pittiuan, F. C. Ellen, T. M. 
Arrington. 



OFFICERS: 



T. M. ARRINGTON, Moderator, 

A. G WILCOX, Clerk and Treasurer, 



Rocky Mt» 
Brinkleyvillb. 



GOLDSBOEO, N. C. 
NASH BROS., PRINTER.? AND BINDERS, 
1906. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Aged Ministers H. A. Willis 

Orphanage Braxton Craig 

Ministerial Education L. L. Morgan 

Temperance J. T. Jenkins 

Woman's Work J. E. Ayscue 

Periodicals . , J. E. Hocutt 

Sunday Schools T. J. Taylor 

Associational Missions G. M. Duke 

State Missions C. G. Lowe 

Home Missions R. D. Carroll 

Foreign Missions J. M. Mercer 



PASTORS AND POST OFFICES. 

Ayscue, J. E Greenville 

Bobbitt, W. W Littleton 

Brooks, C. V Tarboro 

Craig, Braxton Rocky Mount 

Cree, A Embro 

Crisp, T. J Conetoe 

Carroll, R. D Williamston 

Coppedge, G. W .* Henderson 

Cullom, W. R Wake Forest 

Duke, G. M Mapleville 

Eubanks, I. T Bethel 

Fox, E. Lee 

Henderson, J. K , Roanoke Rapids 

Hocutt, J. E Nashville 

Howell, J. K Rocky Mount 

Howell, .J. D Hobgood 

Holmes, G. W Epsom 

Hunter, A. D Gary 

Jenkins, J. T Wilson 

Jones, J. W Wake Forest 

Larkins, J. D Henderson 

Lowe, C. G Enfield 

Lumpkin, G. T Scotland Neck 

May, G. W Rocky Mount 

Marshall, O. N Henderson 

Merrell, G. L Rocky Mount 

Morgan, S. L Littleton 

Mangum, O. R Wake Forest 

Mercer, J. M Washington 

Nobles, J. W Plymouth 

Poe, E. D Wake Forest 

Rogers, J. L Whitakers 

Sledge, J. W Stallings 

Stradley, I. R Oxford 

Taylor, T. J Warrenton 

Vernon, T. L Tarboro 

Willis, H. A Weldon 

Williams, C. C Spring Hope 

Wilcox, A. G Brinkleyville 



Proceedings, 



Red Oak, Nash County, October 9, 1906. 
The seventy-sixth annual session of the Tar River Association met with 
the church here to-day. The Moderator called the body to order and Bro. 
G. M. Duke led in prayer and read a scripture lesson. Bro. S. L. Morgan 
preached the introductory sermon. Text: Matt. 28th chapter, 18th, 19th 
and 20th verses. After sermon the roll of churches was called and delegates 
enrolled as follows: 

Antioch— Richard Parker, J. Draper. 

Aurora — 

Battleboro— T. D. Wright, H. B. Ferrell, G. Ward. 

Bear Swamp— .1. W. Bowers, Arthur Porter, J. W. Crawley. 

Bethel— J. T. Eubank. 

Bethlehem — Jesse A. Carter. 

Brown's — J. W. Smithwick. 

Gary Chapel — By letter. 

Castalia — S. J. Bartholomew, George W. Boon. • 

Cedar Branch — L. A. Sykes. 

Cedar Rock— J. A. Wheeless, T. H. Sledge. 

Conoconary — J. Ellen, Thomas Westray. 

Conoho— f. J. Crisp. 

Corinth — H. Shearman. 

Crocker's Chapel — E. Crocker. 

Cypress Chapel — By letter. 

Dawson's— O. C. Stallings, O. P. Stallings. 

Eagles — Orlando Pollard, A. Anderson. 

Ebenezer — T. L. Vernon. 

Elm City — J. H. Barkley, A. J. Rowland. 

Elm Grove — E. R. Rackley, S. A. Cockerell, A. C. Williams. 

Enfield— J. H. Sherrod, G. L. Branch, C. Highsmith. 

Enterprise — N. W. Bobbitt, Guy Reid, Picot Reid. 

Ephesus — L. M. Edwards, J. T. Abernathy. 

Everett's — 

Fishing Creek — W. T. Shearin, George Ward, Miles Bobbitt. 

Gardner's — By letter. 

Gethsem.ane — O. L. Pitman, J. C. Marks, G. W. Brantley. 

Greenville— J. E. Ayscue. 

Halifax— A. G. Wilcox. 

Hamilton — By letter. 

Harriss Chapel — W. H. Mabry, J. W. Crawley, G. S. Shearin. 

Henderson — J. A. Kelley, J. T. Elmore, J. D. Larkins. 

Hickory— T. E. Powell, R. H. Stallings, J. M. Sexton. 

Hobgood — By letter. 

John's Chapel — G. L. Finch. 

Joyner's Chapel — B. C. Pearce. 

Littleton— H. J. Caudle, W. H. May. 

Louisburg — 

Macedonia — E. Lee Fox. 

Macon — L. A. Lloyd, Reuben Clark. 

Maple Springs — J. W. Strange, A. W. Perry. 

Marmaduke — M. O. Duke, A. P. Mustain. 

Middleburg — S. G. Champion. 

Midway — R. D. Bowden, Richard Griffin. 

Mildred — T. L. Vernon. 

Mountain Grove — 

Mount Hebron — James A. Bobbitt, C. E. Denton. 

Mount Zion — W. T. Cooper, W. J. Johnson. 

Nashville— G. C. Collins, L. T. Vaughn. 

New Bethel — W. B. Daniel, G. T. Ayscue. 

New Hope— W. H. White. 

New Sandy Creek — ■■' 

North Henderson — O. N. Marshall. 



North Rocky Mount— F. C. Ferguson, R. Modlin. 

Oak Level— W. T. Reger, M. J. Hedricks. 

Peach Tree — A. H. Edwards, J. C. Wheeiess, B. S. Rice. 

Pleasant Grove — W. A. Bains, J. A. Valentine. 

Plymouth— J. W. Nobles. 

Philadelphia— A. C. Griffln, J. A. Parish, W. G. Wheeiess. 

Piney Grove — 

Poplar Springs — .J. M. White, S. J. Aliord, C. P. Cheaves. 

Quankee— W. W. Bobbitt. 

Red Bud— T. S. Collie, W. B. Moore, Ruffin Griffin. 

Red Oak— .J. B. Reid, J. M. Beal, W. T. Jones. 

Reedy Creek — T. A. Harriss. 

Riddick's Grove — 

Roanoke Rapids — J. K. Henderson. 

Robersonville — 

Rock Springs — B. F. Wilder. 

Rocky Mount— T. M. Arrington, E. W. Shearin, D. B. Modlin. 

Rosemary — J. K. Henderson. 

Samaria — A. T. Taylor, O. B. Cone, Ben Bergeron. 

Sanrly Creek — By letter. 

Scotland Neck— N. Biggs, E. E. Hilliard, J. C. Mullen. 

Sharon — R. M. Dunn. 

Social Plains — 

South Henderson — O. W. Marshall. 

Speed — 

Spring Hope — Jim Marshburn. 

Stanhope — S. R. Pierce. 

Stoney Creek— C. F. Ellen, G. W. Coley, J. H. Shearin. 

Sulphur Springs — ,J. A. Shepherd, J. L. Aycock. 

Tarboro — C. J. Austin, F. J. Warren, John Clark. 

Tillery— C. G. Lowe. 

Turkey Branch— By letter. 

Vaughn's — J. J. Marshall. 

W^arren Plains — J. E. Frazier, T. W. Shearin. 

Warren ton — T J. Taylor. 

Washington — 

Weldon — S. Goode. 

Williamslon — R. D. Carroll. 

Wilson— Z. T. Broughton, D. R. Petway, C. V. Petway. 

Roll of churches being completed, the Association was permanently or- 
ganized by the re-election of the former officers, T. M. Arrington, Moderator; 
A. G. Willcox, Clerk and Treasurer; G. M. Duke, Historian. 

Committee on Order of Business was appointed as follows: B. Craig, 
T. J. Taylor and N. Biggs. 

Brethren S. R. Pierce, T. E. Powell and O. L. Pitman were appointed 
a Finance Committee. 

Bro. G. V/. Mfiy, Committee on Religious Exercises. 

Tisiting brethren were invited to seats among us, whereupon J. S. 
Farmer of the Biblical Recorder, and S. F. Conrad, of the North Carolina 
Bap list, responded and were welcomed. 

The following pastors. Brethren C. V. Brooks, N. W. Bobbitt, C. G. Lowe, 
J. L. Rodgers, E. Lee Fox, who have come into our Association since last 
meeting, were welcomed. 

A partial report on the order of business was submitted and adopted. 

Brother May welcomed the Association to Red Oak Church and neighbor- 
hood in a few well chosen remarks, to which, by request of the Moderator, 
Brother J. T. Jenkins happily responded. 

Adjourned for dinner with prayer by Brother Brooks. 



AFTERNOON SESSION. 

Association reassembled and led in prayer by Brother Cree. 

The hour for special order having arrived and the report on Periodicals 
not being ready, Bro. J. S. Farmer addressed the body in behalf of the 
Biblical Recorder. Bro. Conrad spoke in the interest of the North Carolina 
Baptist, and Brother Broughton pi-esented the claims of the Messenger. 
The Foreign Mission Journal, the Home Field and Charity and Children 
were a'lso commended. 

Brother Lumpkin having informed the Association that Dr. Mercer v?as 
prevented from attending the Association by the effects of a surgical opera- 
tion to which he had submitted, was requested to send a message of loving 
sympathy to our afflicted brother in behalf of the Association. 

The report on the Orphanage was read by Brother G. T. Lumpkin: 

REPORT ON ORPHANAGE. 

The history of the growth and the presentation of the methods of any 
enterprise that has been pre-eminently successful is always of great inter- 
est to the general public. Measured by any legitimate standard, the Thomas- 
ville Orphanage is a glorious success. From its very beginning until to-day, 
it has been conducted on the highest and most perfect business principles. 
The splendid wisdom and business sense of the management has made it 
an example of best methods for orphanage work, and a constant study in 
wholesome economics. It is a superb example of Baptist brains consecrated 
to the work of God. And the Orphanage is the best expression of the heart 
of North Carolina Baptists. There, as in no other work, have we given to 
the world an illustration of the Master's heart of tenderness and love. 
The Orphanage is a Baptist response to the teaching of Jesus concerning the 
little ones, and is a noble illustration of "pure religion and undefiled before 
God." The Orphanage touches the Christian's heart with the irresistible 
finger of helplessness and appeals to him with the tearful voice of home- 
less destitution, and the Orphanage is our compassionate answer to this 
appeal. 

Because of its splendid achievements, the Thomasville Orphanage com- 
mends itself to the Baptist people of North Carolina. It has been one of 
the greatest agencies of the world; it is one of the mightiest saving sta- 
tions and rescuing forces in existence. It has robbed the gutter of the 
prospects of many a beastly sot and foiled the Devil's attempt to destroy 
many a soul, for it takes the homeless, defenseless little one from unfavor- 
able and destructive environments and places him under influences and 
training that make him every whit a man, that fits him to become a blessing 
to his country, a credit to society, a friend of religion and almost invariably 
a child of God. And were he not thus rescued he would often become a 
menace to society, a disturber of peace and a foe to religion. 

The Orphanage is not only a shielding and saving institution, it is also 
a trainmg and developing agency, and pre-eminentlv so. It not only rescues 
the orphan, but: builds manhood and character in him. It sets before the 
child life's highest ideals. It trains and sends him into the world by way 
of the Cross and they go forth to render service to men and glory to God 
This IS the Orphanage idea at Thomasville, and it is refreshing to observe 
the growth of this wider and more helpful orphanage conception and sen- 
Liment. 

Aims. 

- \t® fi™^ °^ ''^^ Orphanage are to find and furnish a home to every orphan 
m North Carolina, as far as possible to furnish these foundlings that love 
care ana training of which the loss of parents and home has bereft them' 
ana to send them forth to meet life's issues with strong characters and 
sufficient training to succeed in the honorable walks of life. Our present 
manager has given special attention to the cultivation of the aesthetic side 



Needs. 

So great an institution, with such exalted aims, and accomplishing such 
results is confronted by continual and immense needs. The demands upon 
the Orphanage are great and her call upon the Baptist people must neces- 
sarily be urgent. May I mention a few of the immediate needs? Our Or- 
phanage entered into 'this fiscal year with a debt of $6,000. This must be 
paid. There is a constant demand for repairs and improvements. Brother 
Kesler desires to improve the convenience and general efficiency of the 
Orphanage continually, and that is wise. The present infirmary is inade- 
quate and must be enlarged at once. The cost of living has advanced so 
much that Brother Kesler was compelled to ask for a larger monthly appor- 
tionment for each child, and we have 325 present now, an increase over 
last year. Many orphans from every quarter of the State are begging for 
admission, and already new buildings are being planned. We must enlarge. 
And all this calls for MORE MONEY. The work must go on. Brother 
Kesler proposes that the Baptist Sunday schools, together with Thanks- 
giving offerings, shall support the Orphanage. They can do it. 

The Tar River Association has always stood in the front in the Orphanage 
work. Yet there are many Sunday schools and churches that give nothing. 
Your committee urges that an effort be made to get every church and Sun- 
day school in the Association to contribute to this work; that the Associa- 
tion make a special effort to raise $5,000 for this work next year, and that 
the Committee on Orphanage for next year be instructed to correspond 
with every Sunday school superintendent and pastor in the Association and 
endeavor to secure the promise from each school to make monthly offerings, 
and that the pastors will endeavor to take Thanksgiving offerings in each 
of his churches for this work. G. T. LUMPKIN, 

For Committee. 

Brothers Lumpkin and Taylor addressed the body and a collection of 

$1,000 was taken for the rebuilding of the Watson House. Brother Taylor 
undertook to raise $500 of this amount and the other $500 was secured as 
follows: 

G T. Lumpkin $ 50 . 00 Red Bud 5 . 00 

Rocky Mount 50 . 00 J. K. Henderson 10 . 00 

Bro. Duke's field 50.00 Elm City 10.00 

Weldon 25 . 00 Oak Level 10 . 00 

Tarboro 25.00 Plymouth 5.00 

Greenville 25.00 New Bethel S. S. (paid) 5.00 

Henderson 25 . 00 Corinth 10 . 00 

Stony Creek 25.00 A.T.Taylor 5.00 

Bro. Vernon's field 10 . 00 Conoconary 5 . 00 

Bro. Marshall's field 5 . 00 Mrs. Mollie Beal 5 . 00 

Bro. Rodger's field 10.00 Mrs. Rebecca Beal 5.00 

Enfield 20.00 Mrs. O. L. Pitman 5.00 

New Hope 5 . 00 Louisburg (G. M. D.) 10 . 00 

Red Oak 20 . 00 Mountain Grove S. S 5 . 00 

Fishing Creek 10.00 Bro. Eubanks 5.00 

Hickory 10 . 00 Bro. Jenkins 15 . 00 



Castalia 10.00 — 

Williamston 20 . 00 Total $510 . 00 

A cash collection for current expenses, amounting to $26.66, was secured. 
Bro. Merrill read the report on Home Missions, the discussion of which 
was deferred. 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher reported as follows: 
Henderson the place; time, Monday night after the first Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1907. Bro. G. W. May to preach introductory sermon. Bro. J. T. 
Jenkins, alternate. 

G. M. DUKE, 
T. S. COLLIE, 
REUBEN CLARK, 

Committee. 



Adjourned with prayer by Bro. Brooks. 

WEDNESDAY MORNING, 10 O'CLOCK. 

The Association met and devotional exercises were conducted by Bro. 
V. T. Brooks. The minutes of yesterday were read and approved as re- 
corded. 

Visiting brethren invited to seats with us, and Dr. W. L. Poteat, President 
of Wake Forest College, and Dr. William H. Smith, Assistant Secretary of 
the Foreign Mission Board, responded. 

The report, on Periodicals was read by Bro. J. E. Ayscue and adopted, 
as follows: 

REPORT ON PERIODICALS. 

Public opinion is largely molded by the press. Now as never before people 
make up their minds not so much from what they hear as from what they 
read. So great is the power of the press to-day that in many sections of our 
country not even the politician can secure a hearing, because the people 
have already come to decisions on issues through the reading of the news- 
papers. 

Since the press has such an influence, it is necessary for us as a denomi- 
nation, if we would hold and shape the thought-mold of our people, to dif- 
fuse among them the very best of Christian literature. We, as a denomi- 
nation, have the very best obtainable literature, and we would recommend 
all periodicals published by the denomination. 

Our Sunday School Board in Nashville, Tenn., publishes sufficient and 
satisfactory literature, and we recommend its use in our schools. 

We heartily recommend the Foreign Mission Journal and the Home Field, 
published by our Foreign and Home Mission Boards. The Foreign Mission 
Journal is especially helpful to workers in the Woman's Missionary Socie- 
ties, and is indispensable to those who would be well-informed about mis- 
sions. 

Our State publications are growing in strength and efficiency, and should 
receive the support of our people. The North Carolina Baptist is a good 
paper, and in many sections performs much service in raising the standard 
of moral life. 

The Messenger, published by Bro. Jenkins, in Wilson, though doing local 
work, bids fair to be very helpful to our Eastern section. 

Charity and Children is one of the best papers of our denomination, and 
is the best paper that can be used in connection with our Sunday schools. 

The Biblical Recorder is our best paper. It is I'ecognized both North and 
South as being one of the best denominational papers in the United States, 
and it is continually growing better. It should be in the home of every 
Baptist family in North Carolina, and should find large circulation beyond 
the borders of our State. JOHN E. AYSCUE. 

Bro. C. J. Austin was a,ppointed to audit the accounts of the Treasurer of 
the Association and the Ti'easurer of tlie Executive Committee. 

The hour of special order having arrived, the Report on Associational 
Missions was read by Bro. Braxton Craig: 

REPORT ON ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONS. 

Twentj'-eight years ago this Association undertook in a systematic way 
to evangelize the destitute places within its bounds. These years have 
been years of trials and triumphs, but through all of our trials God has 
wonderfully blessed us. 

Twenty-eight years ago we had only :32 churches, with a membership of 
2,900. Now we have 96 churches, with a membership of more than 10,000. 

Twenty -eight years ago we gave but little to the various objects of our 
Southern Baptist Convention. Now the Tar River Association stands among 
the foremost in the State in its gifts to benevolent objects, and some of 
the churches established by your Board are giving more to Foreign Mis- 
sions this year than the whole Association gave when we undertook this 
great work of evangelization. 



8 

It is not claiming too much to say that the greater part of this growth 
is due to the efforts of Associational ilission work, for as we have in- 
creased our contribution to Associational Missions, we have increased to 
all of the objects of our Convention. But, brethren, we have not increased 
our contributions in proportion to our wealth, nor according to the increase 
of members. When we began we gave an average of 50 cents per member; 
last year we gave a little less than 30 cents per member. 

Our Needs. 

Some one may ask, do we need as much money now as when we began 
this work? We need more. We have more inviting fields to-day than we 
have ever had. Thei'e are more people and congregations can be more 
easily formed, and then our whole Eastern country is being rapidly devel- 
oped, and the demands are greater upon us than at any time in our history. 
We need more churches in Edgecombe, Halifax, Martin, Pitt, Beaufort, and 
perhaps we need a few more churches in the upper part of the Association. 

Your committee would call special attention to the growing town of 
Farmville. We ought to have a church and a man located there. 

The Work of the Year. 

The Lord has greatly blessed the labors of our missionaries this year. 
Your committee addressed a letter of inquiry to all of the pastors of the 
Association. Twenty of them answered this letter. These 20 report 336 
baptisms, and vour missionaries report ]52 of this number. These pastors 
report 148 additions by letter and restorations, of this number 78 were 
received into our mission churches, making 230 additions to our mission 
churches. Besides this, a number of oui brethren failed to report, and we 
feel sure that at least 300 have been added to our mission churches this 
year. 

At South Rocky Mount, Elder G. L. Merrill is building a beautiful chapel, 
and he hopes to have it ready to worship in before the end of the year. 

The work at Sharpsburg has taken on new life, and the people of that 
town, with the help of friends, are building a neat house of worship, which 
will cost abouu $800. We hope to organize a church there during this month 
and be ready to worship in the new house on the third Sunday in November. 

Brethren, the reports are encouraging from all parts of the field, but 
we are confronted with one difficulty, namely, funds with which to carry 
on the work. The State Mission Board, so long our faithful helper, urges 
us to partially relieve it, in order that it may answer urgent calls in other 
parts of our State. We must increase our contribution or suffer a great 
loss. Let us honor God with our substance, and heed his voice and "Go 
forward." BRAXTON CRAIG. 

After discussion by Bro. G. M. Duke and Bro. Braxton Craig, the roll of 
churches was called and pledges secured as follows: 

Scotland Neck $ 300.00 Red Bud 15.00 

North Rocky Mount 150.00 Rock Springs 15.00 

Rocky Mount 150 . 00 Rosemary 15 . 00 

Henderson 115.00 Speed 15.00 

Greenville 100.00 Woman's Missionary Society 15.00 

Wilson 100.00 Warren Plains W. M. S 15.00 

Weldon 75.00 Rocky Mount W. M. S 15.00 

Warrenton 75 . 00 Bethel 12 . 50 

Brown's 75 . 00 Antloch 10 . 00 

Stony Creek 60.00 Aurora 10 . 00 

Washington 50 . 00 Bethlehem 10 . 00 

Tarboro 50.00 Corinth 10.00 

Roanoke Rapids 50.00 Eagles 10 . 00 

Poplar Springs 50.00 Enterprise 10.00 

Enfield 50.00 Ephesus 10.00 

Williamston 50 . 00 Everetts 10 . 00 

Littleton 35 . 00 Macedonia 12 . 00 



Sharon 30 . 00 

Dawson's 30.00 

Bear Swamp 25.00 

Cedar Rock 25.00 

Cypress Chapel 25.00 

Elm City 27.00' 

Macon 25.00 

Maple Springs 25.00 

Mashville 25.00 

New Bethel 25 . 00 

Philadelphia 25.00 

Red Oak 25.00 

Sandy Creek 25.00 

Tillery 25.00 

Gethsemane 24 . 00 

Conoconary 20 . 00 

Gardner's 20.00 

Hamilton 20.00 

Harriss' Chapel 20 . 00 

Hickory 20 . 00 

Middleburg 20.00 

Mount Zion 20.00 

-Samaria 20.00 

Warren Plains 20 . 00 

Carv's Chapel IG . 50 

Reedy Creek 1 5 . 00 

Battleboro 15 . 00 

Castalia 15.00 

Cedar Branch 15.00 

New Hope 15.00 

Ehenezer 15.00 

Fishing Creek 15 . 00 

Hobgood 15.00 

Jovner's Chapel 15 . 00 

Mildred 15.00 

North Henderson 15.00 

Oak Level 15.00 

Peach Tree 18.00 

Pleasant Grove 15.00 

Plymouth 15.00 

Hickory W. M. S 5 . 00 

Rocky Mount Baraca Class. 5.00 

White Level 5 . 00 

John W. Sledge 5.00 

Stony Creek W. M. S 5.00 

Stony Creek S. S 5 . 00 

G. W. Ward (paid) 5 . 00 

W. T. Regis 5.00 

J. T. Ellen 5.00 

G. W. Coppedge 2.50 

A. C. Grithn 5.00 

J. E. Hocutt 2.50 

Mrs. .L E. Hocutt 2.50 

Poplar Springs W. M. S 5.00 



Marmaduke 10 . 00 

North Henderson W. M. S.. . 10.00" 

Mountain Grove 10 . 00 

Mount Hebron 10 . 00 

Quankee 10.00 

Robersonville 10 . 00 

South Henderson 10 . 00 

Sulphur S prings 10 . 00 

Turkey Branch 10 . 00 

Vaughan's 10.00 

Whitakers 10 . 00 

Scot. Neck Baraca Class.... 10.00 

Scot. Neck Infant Class 10.00 

Warrenton Young Men's 

Class 10.00 

Rocky Mount S. S 10.00 

Mrs. Z. A. Eagles 10.00 

Stanhope 10 . 00 

G. M. Duke 10.00 

S. .J. Bartholomew 10 . 00 

Midway 7.00 

Conoho 5.00 

Crocker's Chapel 5.00 

Elm Grove 5 . 00 

Halifax 5.00 

Piney Grove 5.00 

Riddick's Grove 5 . 00 

Social Plains 5.00 

Henderson S. S 5.00 

Henderson W. M. S 5.00 

T. L. Vernon 5.00 

South Rocky Mount 5 . 00 

Mountain Grove S. S 5.00 

Maple Springs W. M. S 5.00 

Scotland Neck Ladies Study 

Class 5.00 

Scot. Neck Sunbeams 5 . 00 

Warren Plain's W. M. S 5.00 

Warren Plains Infant Class 5.00 

Nashville Sunbeams 5.00 

Castalia S. S 5.00 

Peach Tree S. S 2 . 50 

Peach Tree W. M. S 2.50 

Sandy Creek (paid) 2 . 00 

J. C. Davis (paid) 2 . 00 

J. A. Bobbitt 1.00 

Mrs. M. W. Drake (paid)... 1.00 

,L H. Barclay (paid) 1.00 

W. B. Dozier (paid) 1.00 

A. .1. Rowland (paid) 1.00 

Mrs. Haithcock (paid) .50 

Total $2923.50 



After which the report was adopted. 

Report on Foreign Missions was read by Bro. .1. T. Jenkins and was ably 
discussed by Dr. William H. Smith, Assistant Secretary of the Foreign 
Mission Board: 



^ 10 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

Association, Home, State and Foreign Missions are all the same to the 
l^rd, each is related to and dependent upon the others. 

Jesus Christ said, "Go make disciples of all nations." No one who be- 
lieves in him can consistently withhold his support from Foreign Missions. 
Indeed, with his commands sounding in our ears it seems the highest trea- 
son to refuse to take part in the world-wide evangelization. Just now there 
are some facts which especially emphasize Foreign Missions. 

1. The door of the world is open. Until verj- recently the largest part 
of the world was closed to the gospel. Those who went thither with the 
gospel could hardly find conveyance; to enter was to violate the law. Nor 
would they have protection for life or property while there. To-day, ex- 
cept where Mohammedanism prevails, nearly the whole world is open to 
the gospel. Conveyance can be easily found to all parts of the globe, taking 
the travelers to the places long inaccessible, and treaties between nations 
secure protected residence even amid people of little civilization. In addi- 
tion to this, the work of the missionaries has reduced to wi'iting the vast 
body of known languages, so that the Bible, in whole or in part, is published 
in the hundreds and hundreds of tongues. The opening of the world to 
Christ in the last three decades has been one of the marvels of human his- 
tory. It is God who has opened this door to his people. When he gives 
an opportunity like this, he thereby calls on us to embrace it. 

2. The world has been opened to the gospel at the time when God's 
people are wonderfully prepared to enter the open door. Through the in- 
fluence most largely of the Foreign Mission movement, Protestant Christians 
have increased amazingly. This is especially true of us Baptists. Had the 
door been open a hundred years ago we should have been so weak that the 
best we could have done would be to stand and wring our hands because 
we could not enter. But now we have men enough and money enough to 
seize and hold every field which the providence of God opens to us. It was 
our ! or i Jesus Christ who said "from him to whom much is given will much 
be required." More than five millions of Baptists, with billions of wealth, 
look into the open door of the world, and the command of God bids them 
enter. How dare we refuse? 

3. The gospel is meeting with marvelous success on the foreign fields. 
In the last half century more than a million and a half of men in heathen 
lands have been won to the Christian profession, and three or four times 
that number sympathize with Christianity. In proportion to men and 
means employed, God has granted to us Baptists more than our propor- 
tionate measure of success. 

4. The heathen world is waking up. Before the government building in 
Tokio stand two cannon. One, a Russian gun brought from Port Arthur, is 
a battered, broken, ruined piece of steel. The other, a Japanese gun, which 
battered, broke and ruined it. The Japanese gun was struck only twice 
and is yet thoroughly fit for service. This object lesson shows how Ja- 
pan's race of despised yellow men battered, broke and defeated the largest 
empire of white men in Europe. China is waking as fast as Japan, but 
being ten times as large in territory and population, it will take a while 
longer. Under the leadership of Japan, she is learning the art of war and 
other things which made Western nations great. Even India is feeling the 

. throb of a new life. Railroads are penetrating darkest Africa. The world 
is waking up. It rests in the hands of Christian people, largely in the 
liands of American Protestants, to decide whether this waking up shall be to 
war and violence, to devastation and destruction, or to peace and religion 
and happiness. And Southern Baptists, by their claims, by their history 
anl by their position, ought to stand in the first place among all Christians 
in revealing to this awakening world, its God and Savior. 

We send missionaries to pagan lands because there Christ is not known. 
We send missionaries to lands under allegiance to the Pope of Rome, be- 
cause there, as we believe, Christ is not truly known. In pagan lands Christ 
is not represented; in papal lands Christ is misrepresented. We may go to 
pagan lands as Christians. We must go to papal lands as Baptist Chris- 
tians. In China we go to publish salvation; in Italy and Brazil and Mexico 



11 

we go to correct the interpretation of a salvation already published. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN T. JENKINS. 

The following resolution was introduced by Bro. T. J. Taylor: 

Resolved, That the churches of che Tar River Association undertake to 
raise during the present year $3,000 for Foreign Missions. 

The resolution was unanimously adopted, after which the report was also 
adopted. 

The Association adjourned for dinner. Benediction by Bro. R. D. Carroll. 

WEDNESDAY, 2:30 P. M. 

Association met and was led in prayer by E. W. Eubanks. 

The report on Home Missions was read by Bro. G. L. Merrell, as follows: 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

1. The Home Mission Board, located at Atlanta, Ga., has the supervision 
of the general mission work within the bounds of the Southern Baptist 
Convention. This includes the territory in the States both east and west 
of the Mississippi River. In the States the Home Board does its work in 
co-operation with the State Mission Boards of these States, and with the 
Boards of other Conventions. The Home Board also does work in Cuba, 
Isle of Pines and Panama unaided by other Boards. 

2. We are not aware of the vastnoss nor of the importance of the Home 
Mission work until we view its scope and bounds. Great opportunities and 
lai'ge responsibilities call loudly for workers and equipment. Let us 
notice some ot these opportunities and obligations: 

First. We owe it to help the millions of negroes among us, and the 
Board's plan of co-operation with the Home Mission Board of the Negro 
National Convention is the best and most economical. 

Second. Our mountain school work. In all we have 22 mountain schools, 
with an enrollment of 3,919 pupils. Of these, 164 professed religion during 
the year. Eight of these schools are in North Carolina, with 32 teachers 
and 1,415 pupils. 

Third. The Great Southwest. There are eighty thousand more square 
miles of territory within the Southern Baptist Convention west of the 
Mississippi River than there is territory in the Convention east of that 
river. This territory, rich in soil, minerals, timber and climate, is now at- 
tracting multitudes of immigrants, and presents one of the greatest oppor- 
tunities for Home Mission work. 

Fourth. The destitution of our gi'eat cities, together with the problems 
of immigration and foreign population. St. Louis has 750,000 population, 
and less than 7,000 white Baptists; New Orleans has 300,000 and barely 
1,000 white Baptists, and Baltimore 000,000 and only 7,000 white Baptists. 
Over one million immigrants came to our shores during last year, and at 
the present rate of increase, 1906 and 1907 will land a million and a half. 
There are now about thirty million foreigners in our land. 

Fifth. The gateway to Missions. If we will only evangelize our South- 
land and keep her people salted with the gospel of Christ, the West India 
Islands and the Canal Zone shall prove the Gateway to world wide evan- 
gelization. 

Sixth. During last year the number of workers increased from 718 mis- 
sionaries to 880. Last year we had 10,551 baptisms; this year 15,436. There 
was a total increase in receipts over last year of $30,705.23. The Tar River 
Association gave to Home Missions in 1895 only $251.46; in 1900, $288.97, 
and last year, 1905, the Tar River Association gave to Home Missions 
$1,201.92. We can raise $1,500 for next year. As the Lord prospers us let 
us see that we do not neglect the Home Field, for it means much to all the 
world. Respectfully submitted, 

G. L. MERRELL. 



12 

After some discussion on the foregoing report, tlie following resolution 
was introduced by Bro. T. J. Taylor: 

Resolved, That the churches of the Tar River Association undertake to 
raise during the present year $1,500 for Home Missions. 

V^rtiich resolution was unanimously adopted, after which the report was 
adopted. 

The report on Education was read by Bro. G. W. May and was ably dis- 
cussed by Dr. W. L. Poteat, President of Wake Forest College. After which 
the report was adopted. 

REPORT ON EDUCATION. 

Education is of so much Importance that we need to continue to study 
the problems connected with it. 

It means the preservation of force for the next generation. It becomes 
capital for the social, civic, and moral business of man. 

It embraces every fiber of man's nature, and quickens every faculty of 
his being. 

It is very important therefore, that it should be obtained under proper 
influences and environments. 

Since man must eat bread in the sweat of his face, he should be trained 
that all honorable work is an honor to the doer. Trained where labor is 
held in high esteem. Trained where moral atmosphere is good. 

We Baptists should send our children where they would be under Baptist 
influences, so we may retain their force for our Churches. We need them 
they need us. God's cause needs their strength. Our high schools should 
be loyal to our Colleges. We should have our preparatory schools so ar- 
ranged that they would be feeders to our higher institutions. Their curric- 
ulum should be so arranged that students finishing their course should 
be prepared to enter our colleges. They should be a strong force for 
Christian character. They should so train and direct our boys and girls 
that they would love Christian work and church service. 

We need to work in such a way that as a denomination we will not 
estrange ourselves from those who are laboring for the education of the 
citizenship of the State, but work in harmony with all men who would lift 
up the State if v/e wish to retain our influence in the State, and mould 
public opinion and therebv make its character. 

Wake Forest's cr}- for $150,000 additional endowment, is a real cry of 
need on the mother's part to her noble sons. We now rise to the need of 
our "Alma Mater." It is necessary, not that she may boast of her large 
endowment, but be able to house and train her growing family. 

Our University for women at Raleigh must be endowed. I feel that it 
is a burning shame that we who boast that, "the hand which rocks the 
cradle rules the world," and yet we spend more than "ten dollars on our 
boys, to one on our girls," and leave the hand which rules the world to do 
its work in ignorance. We must give our sisters the same chance we do 
our brothers. 

Chowan Baptist Female Institute and Oxford Female Seminary, are 
institutions doing a great and noble work for our girls, but are handicapped 
by lack of endowment. We need as a great people to come to their help. 
We cannot do without them, they cannot be to us what they yearn to be 
for lack of funds. 

We ought to get our Baptist men and wom.en to teach everywhere we can, 
for in the school room is the place to make an impression, which will not be 
forgotten and which the world cannot destroy. 

Respectfully submitted, G. W. MAY. 

Bro. J. D. Larkins read the report on 

STATE MISSIONS. 
State Missions is an undertaking on the part of the churches, through 
the State Mission Board to give the gospel to those in our State who have it 
not or not able to pay for it. We desire that the gospel shall spread over 



13 

our State as the waters cover the great deep. To this end each and every 
church and church member should be enlisted. When we consider the 
destitute places in our State and the lack of interest on the part of so 
many of our people, the work, more and more, becomes an object of great 
concern. 5 

We need enlistment. Bro. Johnson sometime ago gave us the number 
of churches in each Association who give nothing to State Missions and 
he showed that there were twenty-nine churches in the Tar River, that 
gave nothing at all to State Missions. If this is true the fact is, we need 
enlistment. There is demand for greater gifts in this work. The time has 
come when the churches must keep pace with a progressive spirit. All 
industries have heard and are obeying the command to go forward. We, 
the Churches of Christ, must hear and obey the command. We must not 
bring up the rear, we must lead and lead now. When we consider the 
needs in this work we are only playing. Paul said when he became a man 
he put away childish things, and I think it is time for the Baptists of the 
State to put away childish things in State Missions. Let's throw away 
our toj' pistols and use heavy artillery a while. We need money. Bro. 
Johnson says that he could use one hundred thousand dollars on the field 
Bro. Biggs says the Tar River Association could use all the money now 
used in the State Missions. Some one has said, "Knowledge is power"; we 
can add money is power. How we need many dollars that the crucified 
hand of Jesus has touched. 

We need men. How imperative is our need here. We need well trained 
men, men who have undergone that discipline that will make them a man 
In any place. In order to place the right man in the right place, we must 
pay them. When one works for a living and preaches for pocket change, 
the time will soon come when the preacher will not be worth the pocket 
change. I think the time has come for the Baptists of North Carolina to 
tear down the poverty altars on which they are sacrificing so many good 
men in the ministry. Let's pay our men better and then demand good 
service. 

State Missions is fundamental. This is the basis of operation. Enlarge 
State Missions and you increase contributions to all objects. This is our 
opportunity. If we enter now the door is open, later the door will be 
closed. 

We must act the part of wisdom and in the strength of God come into 
our inheritance. The land is ours, let's go up and possess it. There are 
giants but God is Almighty. 

We suggest a big increase in State Missions. May God help us to give 
the monev and men for this work. Respectfully submitted, 

J. D. LARKINS. 

After the report was discussed by Brethren Larkins and G. T. Lumpkin, 
the following resolutions were introduced by Bro. G. T. Lumpkin: 

"Appreciating the needs of the State Mission Board and the fact that we 
are aitmepting to raise $30,000 this year and that we are far behind last 
year at present in the amount contributed to the Board. 

Therefore, be it Resolved, That each pastor will take a collection for 
State Missions between this and December 1st, 1906. 

Resolved second. That we make an effort to raise $2,500.00 for State 
Missions during our next Associational year." 

The report on Winterville High School was read by Bro. G. T. Lumpkin, 
which was adopted. 

REPORT ON WINTERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL. 

To the Tar River Association: 

At the last session of our Association we were appointed a committee 
to report, at this session, as to the advisability of accepting a proposition 
made to us by the Neuse Association to join with them in the ownership 
and management of the High School located at Winterville, the property of 
the Neuse Association. We visited the school on April 9th and found it 
well managed, full to its capacity and in a prosperous condition under the 



14 

management of Prof. G. E. Lineberry. The property is valuable, wortli, we 
suppose, some $15,000 or $16,000, encumbered with a debt of $4,000. It was 
incorporated in 1901 as the property of the Neuse Association, to be held 
for the cause of education within said Association, by trustees, all of 
whom are to be members in good standing of white churches in that Asso- 
ciation. After much thought and consideration we recommend that the 
proposition be not accepted; first, because we are of the opinion that it is 
unwise for the present for the Association to own a school; second, because 
we do not believe we have the right to place a debt upon the churches in 
the Association for educational purposes; and third, if it was thought best 
to engage in educational work, we do not think it would be best to go 
beyond the boundary of our own Association. 

We take pleasure in stating that we believe the Winterville High School 
is doing much good and is of great aid to our cause, and we cordially rec- 
ommend it to the brethren as being in every way worthy of their patronage. 

T. M. ARRINGTON, Chmn 
G. T. LUMPKIN, 
G. M. DUKE. 

Bro. G. T. Lumpkin made report on the admission of churches at White 
Level and Whitakers, having found the articles of faith, Church covenants, 
&c., in accord with our doctrines, and recommend their reception as mem- 
bers of our Association, which report was adopted and the Moderator gave 
the right hand of fellowship to the representatives of the two churches. 

The Moderator appointed the following brethren as the Executive Com- 
mittee for this year: Noah Biggs, E. W. Sh^earin, O. L. Pittman, F. C. Fer- 
guson and C. F. Ellen, and by resolution the Moderator was added to the 
Committee. 

Brethren Braxton Craig and G. L. Merrell were appointed a committee on 
Digest of Church Letters, and given time to make their report, after the 
adjournment of the Association, and to have the same included in the 
minutes. 

The following standing committees were appointed to report at the next 
session of the Association: 

Aged Ministers — H. A. Willis. 

Orphanage — Braxton Craig. 

Education — S. L. Morgan. 

Temperance — J. T. Jenkins. 

Periodicals — J. E. Hocutt. 

Woman's Work — J. E. Ayscue. 

Sunday School— T. .1. Taylor. 

Associational Missions — G. M. Duke. 

State Missions^G. T. Lumpkin. 

Home Missions — R. D. Carroll. 

Foreign Missions — .1. M Mercer. 

The Moderator, Bro. T. M. Arrington, was elected delegate to the Southern 
Baptist Convention. And the following brethren were elected delegates 
to the Baptist State Convention: A. G. Willcox, G. W. Coppedge and J. W. 
Nobles. 

Adjourned — dismissed by Rev. J. S. Farmer. 



THURSDAY MORNING 10 O'CLOCK. 

The Association opened, re-assembling was led in prayer service by Bro. 
R. D. Carroll. 

The Treasurer of the Executive Committee, and also the Treasurer of the 
Association offered their reports, which were adopted as follows: 

TREASURER'S REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

The Tar River Association in account with N. Biggs Treasurer: 
Oct. 1, 1906. 

To cash paid Rev. G. W. Coppedge $ 40 . 00 

To cash paid Rev. J. W. Sledge 40 . 00 

To cash paid Rev. A. G. Wilcox 118 . 75 

To cash paid Rev. C. Y. Lowe 131 . 25 



To cash pa 
To cash pa 
To cash pa 
To cash pa 
To cash pa 
To cash pa 
To cash pa 
To cash pa 
To cash pa 
To cash pa 
To cash pa 
To cash pa 
To cash pa 
To cash pa 
To cash pa 
To cash pa 
To cash pa 



15 

d Rev. J. L. Rogers 220 . 00 

d Rev. D. J. Bunn 25 . 00 

d Rev. O. N. Marshall 240 . 00 

d Rev. R. D. Carroll 50 . 00 

d Rev. D. McLeod 40 . 00 

d Rev. S. L. Morgan 75.00 

d Rev. J. M. Mercer. .- 400.00 

d Rev. C. V. Brooks 250 . 00 

d Rev. T. S. Crutchfield 125 . 00 

d Rev. J. K. Henderson 125 . 00 

d Rev. R. P. Walker 250 . 00 

d Rev. J. E. Hutson 25 . 00 

d Rev. L. B. Boney 10 . 00 

d Rev. B. Craig 25.00 

d Rev. T. J. Ragland . . . ; 20 . 00 

d Rev. W. W. Barnes 70 . 00 

d Rev. W. P. Davis 50 . 00 



$2,330.00 
October 1, 1905. Cr. 

B.y cash on hand $ 364 . 11 

By cash from Association 2,175.62 

By cash from Middlebiirg 17 . 50 

By cash from Baraca Class (Tarboro) , 5 . 00 

By cash from Rev. T. L. Vernon 10 . 00 

By cash from Rev. T. S. Crutchfield 5 . 00 

By cash from Rev. A. Y. Wilcox 9 . 50 



$2,586.73 
2,330.00 

October 1, 1906. By* cash on hand $256.73 

Examined and found correct. 

C. J. AUSTIN, Auditor. 

REPORT OF TREASURER OF ASSOCIATION. 

Tar River Association in account v^^ith A. G. Wilcox, Treasurer: 

October 1905. 

To balnnr e due Association $ 22 

Received from Finance Committee for State Missions 22.88 

Received from Finance Commitiee for Home Missions 18.17 

Received from Finance Committee for Foreign Missions 16.47 

Received froui Fmance Committee for Ministerial Relief 19.50 

Received from Finance Committee for Education 26.15 

Received from Macon Church for Ministerial Relief 3.00 

Received from Macon Church for Education 2 . 00 

Received from Finance Committee for Minute Fund 87.34 

Received from Finance Committee for Orphanage 50.34 

Received Cash for Orphans 105 . 73 

Received from Corintli Church for Associational Missions 30.00 

Received from Corinth Church for Minutes 3 . 00 

Received Cash for Associational Missions 65.00 

Received from Sharon for Associational Missions 25.00 

Received from Sharon for Minutes 1 . 50' 

Received ■"rom Macon for Associational Missions 22.00 

Received from Macon for Minutes 1 . 50 

Received from Middleburg for Minutes 1.50 

Received from Associational Missions 17. 50 

Received from Macelonia for Associational Missions 1.25 

Excess 3.00 



Examined and found correct. $ 523.05 

C. J. AUSTIN, Auditor. 



16 

Credits. 

By amount paid Walters Durham for State Missions $ 22 . 88 

By amount paid Walters Durham for Home Missions 18.17 

By amount paid Walters Durham for Foreign Missions 16.47 

By amount paid Walters Durham for Ministerial Relief 19.50 

By amount paid Walters Durham for Education 26.15 

By amount paid Walters Durham for Orphanage 50 . 34 

By Cash for Orphanage 105.73 

By amount paid Walters Durham for Education (Macon Church).. 2.00 

By amount paid N. Biggs for Associational Missions (Sharon Ch.) 25.00 

By amount paid Walters Durham for Ministerial Relief (Macon C.) 3.00 

By amount paid N. Biggs for Associational Missions (Macon C.) . . . 22.50 

By amount paid N. Biggs for Associational Missions (cash col.).. 65.00 

By amount paid N. Biggs for Associational Missions (Corinth).... 30.00 

By amount paid N. Biggs for Associational Missions (Middleburg) 17.50 

By amount paid N. Biggs for Educational Missions, excess 3.00 

By amount paid N. Biggs for Associational Missions (Macedonia). 1.25 

By amount paid Clerk, fees 25 . 00 

By amount paid for Expenses 2 . 75 

By amount paid S. S. Alsop, for printing minutes 67.50 

By amount paid for 100 blanks and mailing same 1.14 

$ 524.88 

To balance due Treasurer ". . $ 1 . 83 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. G. WILLCOX, Treasurer. 

Bro. Taylor read report on Temperance as follows: 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 

We reaffirm our former position on the subject of Temperance. Our pas- 
tors should preach on Bible Temperance and strive, to induce our people 
to abstain from the use of intoxicating liquors and we should give our sup- 
port to any practical measure that may be devised in the interest of Tem- 
perance. T. J. TAYLOR. 

The report, without discussion, was adopted. 

Bro. Duke offered his report as Historian, which was adopted. 

Bro. Moderator and Brethren: I am sorry that I am unable to report any 
progress during the past year, not having had the time is my only excuse 
and I hope to be able to report more progress at the next Association. 

G. M. DUKE. 

Bro. Duke offered the following which was adopted: 

Resolved, That the Pastors in Tar River Association take at least one 
collection during the year for the relief of our Aged Ministers. 

The hour for the Special Order having arrived the report on Sunday 
Schools was read by Bro. Hocutt and ably discussed by Bro. H. C. Moore and 
adopted as follows: 

* REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

The Sunday School was never ordained to release the parent from train- 
ing the child in the home, and the holding up the Christian life before the 
eyes of the young. The Sunday School should be an agency of the Church 
of Christ in discipling and training its forces for good. This institution, 
ordained of Gcd for a special work 'n the Church, is sometimes hindered 
because of so much indifference on the part of our people toward it. The 
Bible clearly shows that Gcd established the Church-school for which the 
Sunday school now stands. 

The family was the first agency created of God for the religious teaching 
of man and history states it stood alone as an agency for that work until 
the flood. And when God began anew with a peculiar people he did not 
release them of the same obligation in the family circle, and the training of 



17 

the Church. The Bible was clear on this that Abraham was a teacher in 
the truest sense. 

In the day of Moses the Lord commanded all "Israel"' at certain times to 
"Assemble the men and the women and the little ones, and the stranger that 
is within thy gates, that they may hear and may learn and fear the Lord 
your God, and observe to do all the work of this law and their children may 
hear and learn to fear the Lord your Gk)d." 

The Jewish system of religious training was so improved from time to 
time, until it reached that height of being God's agency for the earthly train- 
ing of the child Jesus Christ. To the Christian workers of this Associa- 
tion let us hear the cry from Jesus: "See that ye despise not one of these 
little ones." But go and make scholars of these and I am with you unto 
the end. J. E. HOCUTT, 

For Committee. 



The report on Aged Ministers was read as follows: 



REPORT ON AGED MINISTERS. 

Of ail the benevolent objects of our denomination, this is the one of pure 
charity. I mean the one object, from which the denomination can and 
does expect no direct return in increased strength and influence. Taking 
this view of it, it is encouraging to note that each year, the board reports 
a steady growth of interest in this work among the churches and increased 
contributions to it. 

But with the increase in numbers of the denomination in the State, 
comes a corresponding increase in the number of those asking and deserv- 
ing assistance from the board. The board is composed of wise and prac- 
tical men who will not make any demands on the denomination that it ought 
not to meet. Let us try to enable them to do the work we have set them 
to do. 

Last week's Biblical Recorder reported $1,463.59 contributed to this object 
since last Convention. Of this amount, one third is invested as a perma- 
nent interest bearing fund, which leaves only $975.73 to be divided among 
thirty families, the number now being helped by the board, which is the 
largest number ever assisted by them at any one time before. 

This gives $32.50 to each family. Many of these families need more than 
this and there are other families that are in need of and deserve assistance. 

At the last Convention it was suggested that each Association appoint a 
representative to co-operate with this Board in it's work and I see no 
reason why this might not be done to advantage. 

The Board also asks that the claims of these aged servants of God to 
our sympathy and support be presented by the Pastors to their churches. 
Is not this a reasonable request? 

The worthiness of this work has been oft repeated. Our obligations to 
the objects of this charity have been often laid before us. In the name 
of our Master, whom they have served so faithfully, let us not fail them. 

IVEY ALLEN. 

The report was adopted. 

Report on Woman's Work was submitted by Bro. S. L. Morgan as follows: 

REPORT ON WOMAN'S WORK. 

During the year Woman's Work has made encouraging progress along 
all lines. The contributions of the Woman's Missionary Society have in- 
creased during the year more than 25 per cent. The amount reported since 
the last session of the Association is $1,861.76, which is distributed as fol- 
lows: For Foreign Missions, $468.30; for Home Missions (including boxes), 
$755.72; for State Missions, $241.27; for Associational Missions, $84.25, and 
for other objects, $312.22. 

There are now in the Association 36 Woman's Missionary Societies, 10 
Sunbeam Bands, and 4 Young Ladies' Societies. Seven new Woman's Mis- 
sionary Societies have been organized during the year. 

Considerable advance has been outlined for the present Conventional year, 
which ends March 31st, 1907. Our Societies are pledged to raise by that 
time $2,000 in cash. An encouraging Woman's Meeting has just been held 



18 

at Red Oak, and another notable advance has been decided, upon. The 
Societies of our Association have decided to adopt as their beneficiary Miss 
Gertrude Abernethy, of Warrenton, who lias entered upon a two years' 
course at the Louisville Training School, in preparation for work on the 
Foreign Mission field. The Societies of our Association will pay her ex- 
penses while in school, amounting to about $150 a year. It is to be dis- 
tinctly understood that this $150 is to be in addition to their pledge of $2,000. 

The problem for next year is to organize Societies in about two-thirds of 
the Churches in our Association, which now have no Woman's Missionary 
Societies. How are the women of those churches to be reached and in- 
terested. Strange to say, a part of the problem is to secure the wider co- 
operation of the pastors. The leaders of our Woman's work have to com- 
plain that letters addressed to the pastors have been ignored again and 
again. And yet those letters have been only modest requests that the 
leaders might be permitted to help the pastors to organize Woman's Work 
in their churches. In their humility these leaders are saying that "success 
depends entirely on the pastors." 

This attitude of some of our pastors and churches moves your committee 
to call special attention to the almost indisputable service, which the Wo- 
man's Missionary Societies are rendering to the cause of Missions. It is 
fair to say that no other department of our work represents so much of 
consecration and self-denial as does the work of our Woman's Missionary 
Societies. Frequently, if not generally, the members of these Societies 
give as liberally as other Church members into the regular treasury of the 
Church, and then, by special self-denial, give liberally also, through the 
Woman's Society. Having done this, they go a step farther in their self- 
forgetfuiness, and turn over their money to the various mission boards, and 
tell the men to use it as they see best. 

But more important than giving, if possible, is the diffusion of Mission 
intelligence and enthusiasm through the Woman's Missionary Societies. In 
many a church a live woman's society has been the flame from which mis- 
sionary enthusiasm has been kindled throughout our entire Church. That 
pastor, therefore, is seriously in his own light who does not heartily en- 
courage the organization and perpetuation of a Woman's Missionary Society 
in his own church. 

The faith and zeal of our women will acknowledge no discouragement, 
but they recognize a difficulty especially affecting their work in country 
churches. Frequently, no leader can be found sufficiently interested and 
competent to insure the success of a Society. It is believed, however, that 
the encouragement and the enthusiasm of the pastor may override this 
difficulty. The leaders suggest that sometimes the pastor himself may 
have charge of the Society. In one or more cases success has come under 
the leadership of a consecrated woman of another denomination. 

The Committee respectfully suggests that in the work of our Woman's 
Societies three ideas should be constantly emphasized: 

1. Teaching. This, it seems to your Committee, should be the funda- 
mental aim. Systematic study of Missions will at length kindle such zeal* 
for Missions — as will not only give, but will talk Missions in the home, and 
will win the men of the Churches to the cause of Missions. 

2. Giving. The need is urgent, the opportunity unprecedented; the 
world is waiting, and the Master says, "Go." 

3. Sending. Too often our effort stops with giving. Should it not be 
our larger aim to find among us some who will go? Our entire Association 
will rejoice because one of our own young women. Miss Abernethy, is now 
fitting herself to become our Missionary to the people across the sea. Who 
knows but her consecration to this work may be due, under God, to the 
atmosphere created by the Woman's Missionary Society to which she be- 
longed? 

May the consecration of noble women in each society create an atmos- 
phere so hallowed that it will be natural and normal for our young women 



19 

to consecrate not merely their money, but their lives as well to the cause 
of Missions! Respectfully submitted, 

S. L. MORGAN. 

And after able addresses by brethren Morgan and Taylor the report was 
adopted. 

WOMAN'S WORK— STATISTICAL REPORT. 



SOCIETIES OP THE 
CHURCHES. 



c o 



A 



<0 OQ 

S CO 






c3 

C 



I % 



C o 






■5^ 
o 



biD C 

I :3 53 (D 



Gardner's 

Greenville 

Greenville L. A. S 

Hamilton 

Harris' Chapel 

Henderson 

Henderson B. Y. P. U. . . 

Hickory 

Littleton 

Littleton B. Y. P. U 

Macon 

Maple Springs 

Mt. Zion 

Nashville 

Nashville B. Y. P. U . . 

North Henderson 

North Rocky Mount 

N. Rocky Mt. B. Y. P. U. 

Oak Level 

Peach Tree 

Poplar Springs 

Roanoke Rapids 

Rocky Mount 

Rocky Mount Y. L. M. S. 
Rocky Mount B. Y. P. U. 

Rosemary 

Sandy Creek 

Scotland Neck 

Scotland Neck Y. L. M. S. 
Scotland Neck Sunbeams 

Sharon . . 

Stony Creek 

Tarboro 

Tarboro Y. L. M. S 

Warren Plains 

Warrenton 

Warrenton Y. L. M. S. . . 

Washington 

Washington Sunbeams.. 

Weldon .... 

Wilson 

Wilson Y. L. M. S 



$ 6 00 



36 90 



151 05 



35 65 



3 34 

1 00 
10 00 

2 95 

3 98 

4 00 



1 45 
1 00 
38 00 
7 00 
4 35 
3 76 



5 00 



5 00 



3 00 



25 



3 25 

3 00 

1 50 

10 00 

12 SO 



3 00 

4 00 
25 

10 00 
6 00 



5 00 
3 34 



6 00 



10 00 

5 00 

5 00 

3 40 



5 00 

I 2 00 

72 00 18 00 10 00 



14 76 



1 00 



2 00 



1 20 



5 00 



2 50 40 00 



1 50 



Totals 532 25 



125 
50 
30 
4 
15 
10 



2 50 

3 OOi 
297 65 j 

22 02 1 
9 42 



1 50 
12 00 
29 93 
10 38 
10 00 



12 50 

2 00 

3 50 
135 08 

3 00 
48 11 



12 



104 06 
57 00 



5 00 
9 00 
2 00 
9 28 

6 10 



13 97 
17 80 



5 08 268 67 



25 00 
11 45 



15 00 
5 00 
5 00 



1 00 



5 00 



18 00 



10 00 



25 00 



105 34 



7 76 



103 34 3 50 



10 00 

1 50 

7 85 

3 20 

1 00 



202 22 



20 00 



10 00 



1 00 



3 80 



10 80 

10 77 

3 00 



45 00 58 62 



287 38 



308 30 
90 58 



6 00 
223 60 

202 22 
10 79 

9 00 
68 00 

9 95 
15 55 

13 76 
6 00 

2 25 
5 00 

14 89 
32 00 

3 00 
40 00 
37 00 

5 00 

8 07 

12 90 

79 81 

5 00 

150 00 

20 00 

60 00 

28 95 

22 85 

710 07 

88 80 

54 43 

22 70 

25 00 

32 50 

4 00 

15 28 
179 53 

8 00 

66 67 

10 77 

141 55 

438 57 

90 58 



868 48,12836 81 



20 

Bro. Jenkins offered the following resolution of thanks which was heartily 
adopted: 

Resolved, That we, the delegates and visitors of the Tar River Associa- 
tion, tender our since thanks to the members of the Red Oak Church and the 
citizens of this community generally, for their very kind and liberal enter- 
tainment and hospitality in caring for our comfort and convenience, both 
while in their generous homes and in transporting us to and from the 
rail road. 

Resolved second, That we thank the Coast Lfine R. R., and the Tar River 
Lumber Co., with its princely Mr. W. L. Groom as General Manager, for vol- 
untarily arranging for and conveying us as far on our way as possible. 

The Finance Committee offered their report which was adopted: 

REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

We, your Committee report that we have secured: 

For Associational Missions $2,398 . 35 

For State Missions 18 . 78 

For Home Missions 21 . 10 

For Foreign Missions 66 . 00 

For Education 33 . 45 

For Orphanage 98 . 81 

For Aged Ministers 24 . 15 

For Minutes 94 . 76 

For Sunday Schools 4.45 



$2,759.85 
Respectfully submitted, . 

S. R. PIERCE, 
T. M. POWELL, 
O. L. PITMAN. 

Note — Of this amount $69.00 is individual pledges, but the names of the 
individuals were on a paper which was not turned over to the Clerk by the 
Finance Committee. 

The Clerk was instructed to have the usual number of minutes printed 
and to receive the usual compensation for his services, and that in future to 
preserve each year a copy of the minutes to be bound into a volume instead" 
of transcribing in a Record Book. 

The following resolution by Bro. Taylor was adopted: 

Resolved, That the various unions of the Tar River Association, meet in 
Wilson in a union of Unions on Thursday night before the fifth Sunday in 
December. 

"Blest be the tie that binds," was sung and after prayer by Bro. Morgan 
the Moderator declared the Association adjourned to meet with the Church 
in Henderson on Monday night after the first Sunday in October, 1907. 

T. M. ARRINGTON, 

A. G. WILLCOX, Moderator. 

Clerk and Treasurer. 



21 



REPORT ON DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS. 



CHURCHES. 


Membership. 


Contributions. 




1905 


1906 


Ls 


Gn 


1905 


1906 


Loss. 


Gain. 


Antioch 


59 


59 






$ 64.00 


$ 89.18 




$ 25.18 


*Aurora 








Battleboro 

Bear Swamp .... 
Bethel 


49 

172 

37 

67 

127 

62 

87 

129 

192 

56 

28 

185 

18 

125 

146 

35 

30 

78 

lis 

62 

116 

99 


64 

180 

32 

64 

124 

70 

81 

134 

182 

61 

29 

200 

19 

135 

139 

35 

26 

71 

134 

94 

98 

99 

33 

73 

174 

42 


5 
3 
3 

"6 

io 
"7 


15 
8 


112.90 

23.65 

134.39 


172.29 

45.42 
151.25 

64 . 38 
358.80 
148.75 
121.50 
131.50 
194.70 
171.96 

44.42 
315.14 
5.50 
153.00 
203.16 
120.94 
122.03 
220.60 

53.25 
715.36 
167.94 



78.00 

300.96 

342.41 

144.29 

2874.33 

6.00 

166.37 

194.17 

2394.29 

326.60 

78.76 

91.77 

147.50 

1201.10 




59.39 
41.77 





83.14 


Bethlehem 


64.38 


Browns 


"s 

5 

"5 
1 

15 
1 

10 


308.71 
94.77 

115.80 
23.70 

147.50 


50.09 


Gary's Chapel . ... 

Castalia 

Cedar Branch .... 




46.02 




5.70 

107.80 


Ceiar Rock 




194.70 


Conoconary 

Concho 


17.90 

"""72'98 

17.33 
379.05 


24.46 
44.42 


Corinth 


225.85 

23.40 

128.88 

276.14 

111.12 

139.36 

599.65 

51.00 

35.50 

148.35 

114.06 


89.99 


Crocker's Chapel. 
Cypress Chapel.. . 

Dawson's 

Eagles 


24.12 

9.82 


E'oenezer 

Elm. City 

Elm Grove 

Enfield 


4 

7 

18 


16 
34 


2.25 
679.86 


Enterprise 




19.59 


Ephesiis 


114.06 




Everetts 


78.00 


Fishing Creek . . . 


75 

168 

42 

171 

6 

47 

128 

143 

93 

36 

55 

102 

121 

201 

92 

79 

190 

56 

60 

62 

33 

80 

158 

160 

30 

157 


2 




113.97 

396.24 

158.44 

2106.59 


186.99 


Gardner's 

Gethsemane 


... 6 


53.81 
14.15 




Greenville 


173 


. . .] 2 


767.74 


Halifax 


4 

47 

131 

150 

81 

34 

48 

101 

135 

201 

105 

97 

185 

58 

76 

62 

32 

83 

156 

166 

32 

144 


2 






6.00 


Hamilton 




251.17 

165.55 

1755.58 

170.57 

56.89 

63.20 

34.50 

1119.03 

1500.00 

95.47 

210.04 

220.00 

96.25 

440.41 



65.00 

7.20 

154.13 

309.68 

458.87 


84.80 




Harriss' Chapel. . 

Henderson 

Hickory 


12 

2 
7 
1 


3 

7 

14 


28.62 
638.71 
156 03 


Hobgood 

John's Chapel.... 
Jovner's Chapel. . 


21.87 

28.57 

113.00 


Littleton 

Louisburg 


"1500! 00 

53.60 


82.07 


Macedonia 

Macon 


5 


13 

18 

2 
16 


41.79 
357.79 
236.00 
139.56 
357.88 
105.71 
168.82 

89.50 
135.00 
225.27 
250.06 
485.81 


147 75 


Maple Springs... . 

Marmaduke 

Middleburg 


16.00 

43.31 

357.88 


Midway 


334.70 




Mildred 


1 




168.82 


Mountain Grove. . 


...] 3 

2]... 

...] 6 

...] 2 

13 .- - 




24.50 


Mount Hebron.... 




127.80 


Mount Zion 




71.14 


Nashville 


59.62 




New Bethel 


26.94 















22 



REPORT ON DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS.— Continued. 



CHURCHES. 



Membership. 



Contributions. 



1905 1906 Ls Gn 



1905 



1906 



Loss. Gain 



New Hope 

New Sandy Creels 
North Henderson. 
No. Rocky Mount. 

Oak Level 

*Pactolus 

Peach Tree 

Philadelphia 

Pleasant Grove.. . 

Plymouth 

Poplar Springs.. . 

Quankee 

Red Bud 

Red Oak 

Reedy Creek . . . . 
Rlddick's Grove. . 
Roanoke Rapids . 
Robersonville . . . . 

Rock Spring 

Rocky Mount . . . . 

Rosemary 

Samaria 

Sandy Creek . . . . 
Scotland Neck .. . 

Sharon 

Social Plains . . . . 
South Henderson. 

Speed 

Spring Hope 

Stanhope 

Stoney Creek . . . . 
Sulphur Springs . . 

Tarboro 

Tillery 

Turkey Branch. . . 

Vaughan's 

Warren Plains. . . . 

Warren ton 

Washington 

Weldon 

Whitakers 

White Level 

Williamston 

Wilson 



65 
117 
148 

56 



81 

65 

153 

192 

61 



217.75 

72.79 

396.67 

808.59 

99.53 



181.60 



345.66 

2102.34 

174.61 



36.15 
72.29 
51.01 



179 

200 

119 

65 

369 

57 

209 

83 

178 

16 

125 

11 

118 

303 

69 

298 

304 

376 

152 

73 

94 

16 

48 

51 

172 

94 

185 

37 

29 

61 

151 

178 

117 

136 



104j 
3421 



198 
194 
136 

56 
360 

61 
182 



27 



180 

18 
137 

15 
1411 
344' 

70 
291 
317 
405 
150 

73 

99 

16 

50 

40 
172 
103 
154 

15 

29 

76 
154 
188 
117 
1291 13 

18 

43 
100 
357 



Total 110206110561 232 587 



19 





5 




2 


11 






"9 


31 




22 






15 




3 




10 



165.28 
137.00 
143.30 



437.35 

6.25 

83.00 

334.45 

176.08 



828.07 

90.00 

224.85 

2510.07 

225.54 

3 60.90 

41.28 

3989.17 

442.79 

96.82 

215.00 

792.69 

433.81 

114.00 

500.08 

143.88 

844.46 

226.72 

32.39 



298.08 
2532.43 
1148.26 
2006.35 



901.10 
5485.61 



161.27 
131.03 
140.66 
502.77 
278.61 
16.40 

1108.47 
412.00 
171.43 
21.39 
686.81 
84.25 
281.60 

3126.51 
201.45 
373.45 
148.78 

4780.83 
541.88 



190.29 



198.63 

77.50 

554.48 

252.52 

858.66 

184.00 

46.45 

170.73 

284.28 

1593.36 



1717.82 

19.25 

1.25 

828.54 

6740.04 



4.01 
6.03 
2.54 



158.74 



4.55 



141.36 

5.75 



24.09 



96.82 

24.71 

792.69 

235.17 

36.50 



42.72 



13.80 

939.07 

1148.26 

288.53 



72.50 



1293.75 

75.08 



502.77 



10.15 

1025.47 

77.55 



21.39 



56.75 
616.44 



112.55 

107.50 

791.66 

99.09 



54.40 

108.68 

14.20 



14.06 
170.73 



19.25 
1.25 



1254.43 



$37850. 641$41438.09|$- 7583.12 $11170.57 



*No report for three years. 

Ninety churches reported this year. Four churches that reported last 
year failed to report this year. Counting them the same in membership as 
last year, we have 10,561 members, making a net gain of 335. Aurora and 



23 

Pactolus have not reported to the Association in three years. We have a 
net gain in contribuiions of $3,587.45, and a total contribution of $41,438.09, 
and if all of our churches had reported, this amount would havo been at 
least $3,000 larger. We have 96 churches in the AGsoc'ation. 

G. L. MERRELL, 
B. CRAIG, 

Committee. 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION— TIMES AND PLACES OF MEETING. 



1. Sandy Creek, Franklin County, commencing on fourth Sunday in Oc- 
tober, 1831. 

2. Maple Spring, BYanklin County, commencing on Thursday before fourth 
Sunday in October, 1832. 

3. Hickory Chapel, Nash County, Thursday before fourth Sunday in 
October, 1833. 

4. Brown's. Warren County, Saturday before fourth Sunday in Oct. 1834. 

5. Red Bud, Franklin County, Friday before fourth Sunday in Oct. 1835. 
C. Shiloh, Franklin County, 23--25th of October, 1836. 

7. Peach Tree, Nash County, Saturday before fourth Sunday in Oct. 1837. 

8. Reedy Creek, Warren County, Friday before fourth Sunday in Oct. 1838. 

9. Flat Rock, Franklin County, Saturday before fourth Sunday in Oc: 
tober, 1839. 

10. Bear Swamp. Halifax County, Saturday before fourth Sunday in Oc- 
tober, 1840. 

11. Louisburg, Saturday before first Sunday in October, 1841. 

12. Gardener's, Warren County, October, 1842. 

13. Poplar Spring, Franklin County, Friday before first Sunday in Oc- 
tober, 1843. 

14. Brown's, Warren County, Saturdaj^ before first Sunday in Oct., 1844. 

15. Maple Spring, Franklin County, Saturday before first Sunday in Oc- 
tober, 1845. 

16. Sandy Creek, Franklin County, 24th of October, 1846. 

17. Enon, Warren County, Friday before first Sunday in October, 1847. 

18. Hickory, Nash County, Friday before first Sunday in October, 1848. 

19. Haywood's (now Corinth), Franklin County, Friday before first Sun- 
day in October, 1849. 

20. Red Bud, Franklin County, Friday after first Sunday in Oct. 1850. 

21. Warrenton, Friday before first Sunday in October, 1851. 

22. Flat Rock, Franklin County, Friday before first Sunday in Oct., 1852. 

23. Peach Tree, Nash County, Friday before fourth Sunday in Au- 
gust, 1853. 

24. Reedy Creek, Warren County, Friday before fourth Sunday in Au- 
gust, 1S54, 

25. Perry's Chapel, Franklin county, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
August, 1855. 

26. Salem, Wilson County, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 1856. 

27. Gardner's, Warren County, Friday before fourth Sundav in August, 
1857. 

28. Poplar Spring, Franklin Countv, Fridav after third Sundav in August, 
1858. 

29. Sharon, Warren County, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 1859. 

30. Franklinton, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 1860. 

31. Maple Spring, Franklin County, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
August, 1861. 

32. Brown's, Warren County, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 1862. 



24 

33. Red Bud, Franklin Counly, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 
1863. 

34. Minutes for 1864 lost in consequence of the confusion of the Civil 
War. 

35. Hickory Chapel, Nash County, Friday before fourth Sunday in Sep- 
tember, 1865. 

36. Bear Swamp, Nash County, Friday after first Sunday in Oct. 1866. 

37. Cypress Chapel, Franklin County, Friday before first Sunday in Oc- 
tober, 1867. 

38. Red Oak, Nash County, Friday before first Sunday in Oct. 1868. 

39. Sharon, Warren County, Friday after fourth Sunday in Oct. 1869. 

40. Poplar Spring, Franklin County, Thursday before first Sunday in Oc- 
tober, 1870. 

41. Haywood's, (now Corinth) Franklin County, Thursday before first 
Sunday in October, 1871. 

42. Sandy Creek, Franklin County, Thursday before first Sunday in 
October, 1872. 

43. Wilson, Friday before first Sunday in October, 1873. 

44. Philadelphia, Nash County, October l--3rd, 1874. 

45. Reedy Creek, Warren County, Thursday before first Sunday in Oct. 
1875. 

46. Henderson, September 28-30th, 1876. 

47. Pleasant Grove, Nash County, October 4-6tii, 1877. 

48. Conoconary, Halifax County, October 10~12th, 1878. 

49. Louisburg, October, 9--12th, 1879. 

50. Peach Tree, Nash County, October 6-8th, 1880. 

51. Antioch, Halifax County, 1881. 

52. Littleton, October 5--7th, 1882. 

53. Rock Spring, Franklin County, October ll-13th, 1883. 

54. Mount Zion, Franklin County, October 9-llth, 1884. 

55. Wilson, October 8-lOth, 1885. 

56. Brown's, Warren County, October 7-9th, 1886. 

57. Samaria, Nash County, October 4-6th, 1887. 

58. Maple Spring, Franklin County, October ll-13th, 188. 

59. Gardner's, Warren County, October 10-12th, 1889. 

60. Greenville, October 9-llth, 1890. 

61. Warrenton, October 8-lOth, 1891. 

62. Louisburg, October 5-7th, 1892. 

63. Philadelphia, October 5-7th, 1893. 

64. Scotland Neck, October ll-13th, 1894. 

65. Wilson, October 9-llth, 1895. 

66. Poplar Springs, October 7-9th, 1896. 

67. Stoney Creek, October 5-7th, 1897. 

68. Weldon, October 4-6th, 1898. 

69. Warren Plains, October 3-5th, 1899. 

70. Spring Hope, October 16-18th, 1900. 

71. Corinth, October 8-lOth, 1901. 

72. Washington, October 6-8th, 1902. 

73. Rocky Mount, October 6-8th, 1903. 

74. Maple Springs, October 4-6th, 1904. 

75. Tarboro, October 3-5th, 1905. 

76. Red Oak, October 9-llth, 1906. 



25 

RULES OF DECORUM. 

Believing it best to be governed by certain rules and regulations in con- 
ducting the business of this Association, we adopt the following: 

1. The Association shall be opened and closed with prayer. 

2. Not more than one person shall speak at a time, who shall rise from 
his seat and address the Moderator. 

3. The person thus speaking shall not be interrupted, unless he violates 
some rule of decorum. 

4. The person speaking shall adhere strictly to the subject, and is nowise 
reflect on any other brother. 

5. No brother shall absent himself from the Association without obtaining 
permission from the body. 

6. No brother shall speak more than twice on the same subject without 
unanimous consent. 

7. No person shall whisper while a brother is speaking. 

8. The names of the delegates shall be enrolled by the Clerk, and called 
as often as the Association requires. 

9. The Moderator may give his ideas on any subject before putting it to 
the vote, but is entitled to vote only in case of a tie. 

10. An order of business shall be made at the beginning of each session, 
and shall be changed only by vote of the body. 



CONSTITUTION. 

1. The Association shall be composed of the pastors and of the members 
chosen by the churches, who shall produce letters certifying their appoint- 
ment. Members thus chosen and convened, together with the pastors, shall 
be denominated The Tar River Baptist Association, which shall have no 
power over the churches, nor shall it infringe on any of their rights. 

2. The letters from the churches shall contain the number then in fel- 
lowship and those baptized, received by letter, dismissed, excluded and 
died since last Association. 

3. The officers of the Association shall be a Moderator, Clerk, Treasurer 
and Historian, who shall be chosen by the Suffrages of the members 
present. 

4. Other churches, upon petition by letter and by delegates, and after 
a satisfactory examination of their Articles of Faith, may be admitted to 
the body by a unanimous vote, when the Moderator shall give to their del- 
egates the right hand of fellowship. 

5. Every church in this Association is entitled to one representative, but 
no church more than three. 

6. Every motion made and seconded shall be left to the discretion of 
the Association whether it shall be debated or not. 

7. The Association shall endeavor to furnish the churches with copies 
of its Minutes. 

8. The Minutes of the Association shall be read and approved, and shall 
be signed by the Moderator and Clerk before the Association adjourns. 

9. Any church not representing itself in this body for three successive 
sessions, by letter or delegates, shall be stricken from the roll of the 
churches, unless satisfactory reasons are assigned. 

10. The Association shall withdraw fellowship from any church which 
shall be found disorderly in faith or practice. 

11. Visiting brethren from sister churches, or similar bodies, may be 
invited to participate in our deliberations. 

12. At each session of the Association delegates to the Baptist State 
Convention and to the Southern Baptist Convention shall be chosen by vote. 

13. This Constitution is subject to alteration by a majority vote of the 
delegates enrolled at any session. 

14. The business of the Association shall be conducted according to 
Mell's Parliamentary Practice. 



•IBIOX 


■If 89 93 

"172" 22 
46 82 
151 50 
65 38 
360 45 
149 25 
122 50 
132 50 

195 20 
172 46 

44 92 

316 64 

6 00 

155 00 

208 16 

121 19 

122 03 
222 60 

54 50 
716 86 
169 94 
140 60 

78 00 
301 96 
383 86 
145 49 
2874 33 
6 00 
167 37 

196 17 
2395 79 

327 60 
86 50 
92 52 

148 50 
1203 10 




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OOOOOOO 0<K><><K>0<>&«^0-D0<>O<><>^0<><X>0<>0-(>C<H>OO0<KK>0<><>00OCK> 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



SEVENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSIOM g 

OF THE 6 







ar Kiver 



HELD WITH THE CHUPXH AT 



Hend[erson» N. C, October 7, 8, and 9, 1907 



The next session to be licl»! with the ciiureli at Srmdy Cj-eek, 
Franklin County, Tuesda>- after the fomtli Suiidjiy in October, 1908. 
To preacli Introductory Sermon, Rev. G. M. Duke; Alternate, 
Rev. .1. P. Bowers. 



OFFICERS ■• , 

T. M. Arkinoton, Moderator, . . . Rocky Mount, X, C. 
A. G. WiLi.cox, Clerk and Treasurer, . . Brinkleyville, N. C. 







Scotland Neck, N. C. 

The CoMMONWEAi.TJi Power Presses. 

1907. 



<>OC><><><X><KHK><X><>OCK><H>0<><XXX><K><>0<K><><K>0<>0<><><>0^ 



INUTES 



OF THE 



SEVENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 



OF THE 



Tar River Association 



HELD WITH THE CHURCH AT 



Henderson, N. C, October 7, 8, and 9, 1907 



The next session to be held with t)ie church at Sandy Ci'eek, 
FinukUn L'ounty, Tuesday after the fourtl) Sunday in October, 1908. 
Ti) preach Introductory Sermon, Rev. G. M. Duke; Alternate, 
Jiev, J. P. Bowers. 



offtcp:rs 

T. M. ARUixt.TON, Moderator, . . . Jlocky Mount, N. C. 
A. G. Wni.cox, Clerk and Treasurer, . .. Brinkleyville, N. C. 



Scotland Neck, N. C. 

The Commonwealth Power Pebsses. 

ieo7. 



Executive Committee. 



T. J. Taylor 
T. M. Pittman 



J. M. Gardner 
G. W. May 
Ivey Allen 



A. W. Perry 
W. B. Daniel 



Standing Committees. 

To write on Aged Ministers Ivey Allen, 

" Orphanage J. C. Kittrell. 

" " " Ministerial Edaration Rev. G. W, May. 

" ''Temperance L. W. Bag-ley. 

" " " Woman's Work J.M.Coleman. 

" "Periodicals T. B. Wilder. 

" " "Sunday-Schools Rev. J. W. Sledge. 

" " " Our Field — by members of Executive Committee. 

" " " State Missions J. T. Alderman. 

" " " Home Missions Rev. A. Cree. 

" " " Foreign Missions Rev. J. P. Bowers. 



Pastors and Po^offices. 

Ayscue, J. E !. Greenville, 

Bowers, J. P Littleton. 

Bobbitt, W. N : Littleton. 

Brooks, C. V , Tarboro. 

Bunn, D. T Spring Hope. 

Cree, A Embro. 

Criach, Worlie Kenly. 

Crisp, T. J Conetoe, 

Coppedge, G. W. . .T. Henderson , 

Cullom, W. R Wake Forest. 

Duke, G. M Mapleville. 

Dowell, Geo. J Williamston. 

Doan, J. R Henderson. 

Hall, W. G Plymouth. 

Henderson, J. K Roanoke Rapids. 

Heilig, J. A Tarboro, 

Hocutt, J, £ Nashville. 

Holmes, G. W Epsom. 

Hunter, A. t) Gary. 

Jonkins, T. J Wilson. 

Jones, W. T Wak« Forest. 

Lowe, C. G Enfield. 

Lumpkin, G. T Scotland Neck, 

May, G. W Castalia, 

Marshall, 0. N Henderson. 

Merrill, G. L Rocky Mount. 

Mercer, L M Rocky Mount. 

Nowell, W. C Spring Hope. 

Poe, E. D Wake Forest. 

Ragland, T. J ". Aurora. 

Rodger, J. L Whitakers. 

Sledge, J. W Stallings. 

Stradley, J. H Oxford, 

Sullivan, J, A Washington. 

Taylor, T. J Warrenton. 

Vernon, T. L Rocky Mount. 

Willis, H. A Weldon. 

Williams, C. C Spring Hope. 

Walton, M. C Elm City. 

Willcox, A. G Brinkleyville. 



PROCEEDINGS, 



Henderson, N. ^., October 7th, 1907. 

The seventy-seventh annual session of the Tar River 
Association met with the church here to-night. Modera- 
tor called the body to order, and Bi'o. T. J. Taylor offered 
prayer. Bro. George Dowell read a scripture lesson and 
Bro. Duke led in prayer, after which Bro. G. V\' . May 
preached the introductory sermon, subject, "The Year of 
Jubilee, or the Acceptable Year of the Lord.-' Text, 
Luke -ith chapter and 9th verse. Sermon ended the roll 
of churches was called and delegates enrolled as follows: 

Antioch — J. R. Parker. 

Aurora — T. J. Ragland. 

Battleboro— T. D. Wright. 

Bear Swamp — W. L. Browning, W. J. Mohorn, Bat. 
Bowers. 

Bethel— By Letter. 

Bethlehem — J. A. Carter, C. D. Hemmings. 

Browns— Walter Smithwick, Walter Allen. 

Gary's Chapel— W. W. Currin. A. H. Hoyle, E. L.> 
Pucket. 

Castalia — W. R. Drake, S. E. Lancaster, Biliie Drake. 

Cedar Branch — By Letter. 

Cedar Rock~J. B. Fulghum, J. E. Paytress, J. W. Dean. 

Conoconara — By Letter. 

Conoho — T. J. Crisp. 

Corinth — H. G. Sherman, J. L. Jackson. 

Crocker's Chapel — 

Cypress Chapel— M. T. Wilder. 

Dawson s — By Letter. 

Eagles— Orlander R. Pollard, Albert Anderson. 

Ebenezer — P. H. l^ane. - 

Elm City— M. C. Walton. 

Elm Grove — Bv Letter. 

Enfield— C. G." Lowe 

Enterprise — J. W. Little. 

Ephesus — By Letter. 

Everetts — By Letter. 

Fishing Creek— W. W. Rosser. 

Gardners— W. A. Shaw. 



6 

Gethsemane — Bro. Rodgers. 

Greenville — J, E, Ayscue. 

Halifax— A. G. Willcox. 

Hamilton— By Letter. 

Harriss Chapel — J. T. Gupton, E. S. Shearin. 

Henderson^J. T. Alderman, J. A, Kelley, T. M. Pitt- 
man. 

Hickory— W. S. Dozier, J. R. Dozier, 

Hobgood— F. A. Ruffin. 

John Chapel — G. L. Finch, A. H. Glover. 

Joyner's Chapel — By Letter. 

Littleton — L. W. Bagley. 

Louisburg — Ivey Allen, T. B. Wilder. 

Macedonia — B. F. Edwards, B. A. Edwards, 

Macon — L. A. Lo3'^d, J. H. Nicholson, J. R. Reggan. 

Maple Springs— A. W. Perry, J. H. Wheless, 0. W. 
Perrv. 

Marmaduke— M. T. Duke, A. P. Mustain, W. C. Haith- 
cock. 

Middlebiirg— R. L. Bennett, J. R. Fleming, S. G. 
Champion. 

Midway— W. H. Leyton, C. T. Perry. 

Mildred— J. A. Heilig. 

Mountain Grove — By Letter. 

Mt. Hebron— A. H. Hicks, E. H. Hawkins, Frank 
Rainey. 

Mt. Zion— Howard Johnson, W. H. Johnson, W. T. 
Cooper. 

Nashville— W. J. Eatchelor. 

New Bethel— W. B. Daniel. 

New Hope— G. R. Dew, M. H. White. 

New Sandy Creek— T. S. West, D. R. West, Wrn. Pen- 
tergrass. 

North Henderson— J. W. Stokes, C. W. Keel, S. S. 
Walton. 

North Rocky Mount— F. C. Furgerson. 

Oak Level — 

Pactolus — 

Peach Tree— D. T. Bunn, J. C. Wheless, H. A. Hines. 

Philadelphia — A. C. Griffin. 

Piney Grove — T. J. Crisp. 

Pleasant Grove — C. W. Winstead, G. T, Baines. 

Plymouth — 

Poplar Springs— W. H. Williams, J. M. White. 

Quankie— Walter Bobbitt. 



Red Bud— W. B. Moore, M. T. Lancaster. 

Red Oak— S. J. Griffin, W. H. Steed, G. C. Reid. 

Reedy Creek — E. H. Neal, B. P. Robertson. 

Riddick's Grove — Geo. J. Dowell. 

Roanoke Rapids — J. K. Henderson. 

Robersonville— W. G. Hall. 

Rock Sprino; — Henry Etheridge, J. L. Cheare?;. 

Rocky Mount—T. M. Arrington, E. W. Shearin, S. K. 
Edwards. 

Rosemary — M. M. Faison. 

Samaria — J. H. Woodard, B. O. Cone. 

Sandy Creek — W. H. Gopton, J. G. House. 

Scotland Neck — R. E. Hancock, N. Biggs, Q. T. Lump- 
kin. 

Sharon- 
Social Plains — J_ W. Sledge. 

South Henderson— B. B. Collins, J. C. Currin, W. E. 
Gupton. 

Speed— W. W. Howard. 

Spring Hope — J. H. Williams, D. L. Chappel. 

Stanhope— 

Stoney Creek— G. W. Coley. 

Sulphur Springs— ^D. P. Ayscue. 

Tarboro— C. V. Brooks. 

Tillery— 

Turkey Branch— W. T. Harden. 

Vaughans — Dallas Riggan. 

Warren Plains— W. E. Hawks, W. B. Weldon. 

Warrenton— Jno. W. Allen, W. D. Weldon, J. M. Gard- 
ner. 

Washington — J. A. Sullivan, J. W. Jones. 

Weldon— H. A. Willis, J. L. Harris. 

Whitakers — J. L. Rodgers. 

White Level — T. C. Collins, Herbert Bartholomew, Josh 
Dfirsey. 

Williamston — Geo. J. Dowell. 

Wilson— C. V. Pet way, D. R. Petway. 

The Association was permanently organized by the re- 
election of its former officers: T. M. Arrington, Modera- 
tor; A, G. Wilicox, Clerk and Treasurer, and G. M. Duke, 
Historian. 

Brethren G, M. Duke, T. J. Taylor and N. Biggs were 
appointed a committee on order of business, who made 
partial report as follows: 9:30, Praise Service; 10.00, 



8 

State Missions; 11:00, Foreign Missions; which was 
adopted . ' 

Bro. Kittreli, for the church and town, extended to the 
delegates and \iisitors a real heart welcome, ''after Hen- 
derson's humble homes, but most hospitable way," which 
was most happily responded to by Bro. Mercer, of Rocky 
Mount. 

The new pastors who had come into our Association 
since the last session were welcomed by the Moderator. 

Visiting brethren were invited to seats, and accepted 
by Prof. Carlisle, of Wake Forest; Bro. Conrad, of the N. 
C. Baptist; Bro. Davis, from West Chowan Association., 
and Bro. Kich, of Greensboro. Bro. Craig, a former 
loved pastor but now a missionary under auspices of the 
State Board, was present as representative of State Mis- 
sions. Bro. T3"ree, pastor First Church at Raleigh, as a 
representative of Foreign Mission Board. Bro. Hufham, 
••the aged and beloved'', who, for a brief season, was 
from us in Virginia, was welcomed b}' the Moderator. 

Adjourned. Benediction by Bro. Tyree. 



1 uesday Morning, 9:^0 o'clock. 

Association met and spent half hour in prayer and 
praise service, led by Bro. Willis. 

Bro. Lumpkin offered a motion that the report on Tem- 
perance be made order for to-night and Bro. Davis be 
asked to speak to report. Carried. 

Report on State Missions was tbe special order for the 
hour, and report was read by Bro. Lowe and spoken toby 
Bro. Craig, in an address of great power. Report adopted. 

Report on State Missions. 

After the ressurrection, our Lord met the disciples in 
.Galilee. He said unto them, "All authority is given unto 
me in heaven and in earth; go ye, therefore, and make 
disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the 
Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, teaching 
them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded 
you, and lo, I am with you all the days, even unto the 
end of the age." 

This declaration is the momentus authorization of world 
wide missions, and it is the implied method of all divinely 
approved missionary proceeaure whatever. 

The author of this report believes profoundly that the 



9 . 

commission given by Christ contemplates this evangeli- 
zation of the whole world. The motive then of State 
evangelizatioji is the motive of world-wide evangeliza- 
tion. So then the actual work of State Missions is not 
only to evangelize North Carolina, but to take the world 
for Jesus the Christ, the Son of God. The evangelization 
of North Carolina is fundamental to all our vs^ork in For- 
eign fields, and also fundamental to the evangelization 
of the territory which the Home Board of the Southern 
Baptist Convention covers. It is, moreover, at the basis 
of all our success in the printing and publication of the 
truth, for the enlargement and happiness of Christian 
manhood, at home and throughout the earth. This State 
evangelization is moreover at the bottoin of all our mar- 
velous achievements in the education of all the people. 
So then, the actual work done by our State Mission Board 
and its able and consecrated Secretary, is Foreign Mission 
work, since it is certain that this State evangelization 
does create and constantly enlarge the conditions that 
make it possible for our work in Foreign fields to be. 

. Some of the wonders that have been accomplished by 
Divine help through the instrumentaiit}^ of State Missions: 
Better church buildings, well equipped schools, our or- 
phanage and our religious publications. So then a great 
number of our church buildings, our schools, our orphan- 
age and our religious publications are largely due to 
State Mission work. 

But after these years of wonderful success. State Mis- 
sions has not finished its task, but just now is well on the 
field to do a larger work than ever before. The value of 
this work as a means of uniting our Baptist brotherhood 
can scarcely be estimated. As Baptists our success is de- 
pendent largely on our organization, our union, our har- 
miony, and our intimacy one church with another through- 
out the State. The purpose of State Missions is to unite, 
solidify, and harmonize Baptists in the State and through- 
out the world. These being elemental truths, how in- 
finitel}^ important it is that this work should have the 
largest place in our thinking, our planning, our praying 
and our giving I 

The gifts to State Missions are increasing by leaps and 
bounds. But North Carolina Baptists must not forget 
that their greatest problem and their nearest duty is the 
evangelization of the unchurched man within her own 
boundaries. He who would best serve his country, his 



10 

denomination, and his God, can do so through gen- 
erous giving to our State Mission work. Every mo- 
tive that Christianity arouses, every ardent zeal that love 
creates, combine in this appeal for generous giving and 
hearty co-operation on the part of all the people support- 
ing the State Mission Board in the saving of our State. 

The following resolution was unanimously adopted by 
the Tar River Association at Red Oak church last year: 
''That we mak-e an effort to raise $2,500 for State Missions 
during our next Associational year." We must act the 
part of soldiers of the Cross, and go fopward in the name 
of our King and raise the above sum. 

It is the opinion of your committee that we ought to 
raise $3,000 for State Missions during our next Associa- 
tional year, for the need calls loudly and the prospects 
promise richly. Let us put our best into the work and 
go up and possess the land for Jesus the Christ, the Sod 
of the most high God. Respectfully submitted, 

C. G. Lowe. 

Bro. Lumpkin offered the following resolution, which 

was adopted: 

'^Resolved, That the Tar River Association adopt 
the suggestion of the committee and undertake to 
raise $3,000 for the work of State Missions; and, re- 
solved second, that every church within the bounds 
of our Association be urged to make their offering to 
State Missions before the 15th of November." 
The Moderator appointed the following committees: 
On Finance — Ivey Allen, W. B. Daniel, Jno. W. Allen. 
Time, Place an«l Preacher for Next Session — G. W, 

May, R. E. Hancock, E. W. Shearin, 

On Digest of Churches— B. Craig, G. L. Merrill, S. N. 

Edwards. 

On New Churches — G. T. Lumpkin, A. C. Griffin, Geo. 

J. Dowell. 

Auditor — C. J. Austin. 

Report on Foreign Missions was called for and Bro, 

Mercer read the report. 

Report on Foreign Missions. 

From the report of our Foreign Mission Board, made to 
the Southern Baptist Convention in May, we take the fol- 
lowing: 

'*We wish gratefully to record our thanksgiving to God 



11 

for His continuous blessings on the work during the past 
year. Both in the home land and on the foreign field 
there has been much to encourage and strengthen. Our 
people in this country have become more interested. They 
are reading and thinking and talking more about mis- 
sions. They are praying and giving- more for missions. 
A large number of our young people are giving them- 
selves to missions. Some are ready, others are preparing 
to go. A new era is on us. Great financial prosperity 
makes us more able to give and increases our responsibil- 
ity. The scores of young men and young women begging 
to be sent should awaken lis to a new appreciation of the 
call of our God. The wide open doors in foreign lands, 
the millions of human beings waiting to be lead, should 
stir the heart of every child of God to immediate action. 

"We look at our contributions for the past year, $403,- 
811.54, and rejoice when we say, 'This is far ahead of any 
former year.' Then we turn to the 1,900,000 members 
who gave it and remember it represents an average of less 
than a half a cent a week, and we feel like bowing with 
Christ in Gethsemane and weeping. We can, we should, 
we Will, do better. We have been making a beginning — 
only a beginning. Yet we rejoice that some are giving 
liberally, A number of individuals and small churches 
give the salary of a native preacher in China, $100. 
Quite a number of others give the salary of a missionary, 
$600. And we praise God that a goodl}^ number of indi- 
viduals and churches this past year have gone up to $1,000. 
Our people are learning to look at the Crucified One and 
through His love at a lost world. Several churches gave 
more for Foreign Missions last year than for pastor's sal- 
ary. Some churches went up to $4,000 or over. Christ is 
leading us. He loves a lost world. Blessed those pastors 
and churches which keep closest to Him in His onward 
march of conquest. 

"Our missionaries on the front line have stood midst 
d-engers and difficulties. Some have fallen, weak and 
faint, but the banner of the Lord has gone forward, and 
they send back the glorious report of 2,239 baptisms dur- 
ing the year. Is not this enough to make every one 
among us join in thanksgiving and praise to God ? After 
we had been working as a Board for 45 years w^e reported 
in 1890 a complete enrollment in our churches in foreign 
lands of 2,213, and now God gives us over that number in 



12 

one year. Brethren, surely we ought to praise Him and 
plan for greater things in His work. 

''Our work has, under God, developed marvelously. 
We are no longer a weak band with a few laborers and 
meager visible results in foreign lands. Our God has en- 
larged us. We have 500 laborers at the front, with thous- 
ands of converts, and thousands more being taught of 
Christ. We have schools, theoligicai seminaries, print- 
ing plants, medical dispensaries and hospitals. These 
are used as aids to co-operate with the hundreds of 
churches and stations to carry Christ to the people.'' 

Further statistics of our foreign work are as follows: 
We have 23.3 churches and 412 out-stations, making a 
total of 645 preaching centres for our missionaries; we 
have 108 day schools with over 2,600 pupils enrolled in 
them, and 204 Sunday-schools with 6,146 scholars. Our 
churches in the foreign fields gave during the year for 
God's cause $29,201.00. Concerning these schools the 
Board justly says: 

"No one can estimate their worth in these lands of 
darkness. To send the children of the converts to native 
schools means to turn them over to heathen practices and 
idolatry. To give them no schools means for them to 
grow up in ignorance. We must help them. These chil- 
dren of our converts, trained not in heathen but Christian 
homes and schools, are the hope of the future." Our seven 
theological seminaries have over 100 men in training and 
they are giving to the native ministers a preparation for 
preaching the gospel that is beyond all valuation. Of this 
work a missionary in China writes: "T am more and more 
convinced that the wisest missionary will henceforth 
spend most of his time training the native Christians; 
they will then evangelize this country more speedily and 
with fewer blunders than we shall be able to do. They 
already know the Chinese heart, a necessary knowledge 
gained by most missionaries after many years of painful 
effort — by some never." These men also know the lan- 
guage, customs, manners and life of their ov^/n people. In 
additioij. to all this the native minister can live on much 
less than the missionary. In China we can employ ten 
native preachers for what it will take to support one f<^r- 
eign missionary and his wife. 

Besides our schools and seminaries our Board is also 
making increased use of medical missions, for the mis- 
sionary-physician is a mighty power under God to open 



13 

heathen homes and hearts. We have now twelve such 
missionaries and they are doing a great Avork. The 
Christian physician ministers to diseased bodies and at 
the same time he tells of the Great Physician of souls. 
In che foreign lands the Christian hospital is called by 
the natives the "Jesus Station." and thousands by this 
means are having their hearts turned to Christ and eter- 
nal life. 

During the last convention year our Board sent out 
twenty-one new missionaries. Only one of these, Mrs. 
Maude Burke Dozier, is from our own State. Is it not 
time that the churches of the Tar River Association were 
pleading with God to call some of their sons and daugh- 
ters to this blessed work ? What higher honor could we 
ask at the hands of our King? 

In conclusion we call attention to these figures: In 
18^7 we had IKJ vvT-orkers on the fields, 228 baptisms and 
1,640 members in the native churches, and our churches 
at home gave for the work $87,000. In 1897 we had 190 
workers, 660 baptisms. 4,324 members, and our contribu- 
tions were $125,000. In this year we have 500 workers, 
2,239 baptisms, 14,437 church members, and our gifts have 
grown to $400,000. Surely for these marvelous blessings 
we ought to praise our God and consecrate unto Him for 
His kingdom ourselves and our all. 

Our veteran missionary in Italy, Dr. Geo. B, Tajdor, 
has laid down his tools and gone to his reward. We 
praise God for his noble and consecrated life, and we 
pray that mantle of godliness may fall upon his succes- 
sors in that hard but important field. 

Respectfully submitted, 

I. M. Mercer. 

In connection with the report Bro. Hufham made the 
announcement of the death of our loved missionary, Bro. 
Geo. B. Taylor. Before the discussion of the report Bro. 
Mercer led the Association in prayer, after which an ad- 
dress of great power was made by Bro. Tyree. 

Bro. T. J. Taylor ofTered the following resolution which 
was together with the report adopted: 

"Resolved, That we undertake to raise |3,000 dur- 
ing the next j'^ear." 

Report on Education was called for, and in absence of 
report Bro. Carlisle addressed the body in a speech of 
great power. 



14 

Report on Education. 

"Education in the widest sense," says Payne, "is a 
general expression that comprehends all the influences 
which operate on the human being, stimulating his facul- 
ties t) action, forming his habits, moulding his charac- 
ter and making him what he is " 

This definition takes into consideration all of our educa- 
tional agencies from the cradle to the grave, and makes 
our teachers responsible. for the bad as well as the good 
in the lives of their students. So if we shall take this 
as the index to our educational status and begin to turn 
about to read the various influences at work in the world, 
in our homes, out on our streets, on the public highways, 
wherever we go, our hearts will be made to sink within 
us as we find ourselves so far, so hopelessly far, from 
the ideal. 

But if we take the popular view and go into our schools 
to find how we stand, we have every reason for encour- 
agement. While as an Association we have no school 
we can call our own, we are within easy reach of many 
of our best denominational schools, which are among the 
very best schools in the State. 

Castalia High School is within our border and is be- 
ginning a noble work that we hope to see increase v,^itli 
the years. 

Right on our border is the Winterville High School, 
young in years but strong in character, and by its facul- 
ty of scholarly Christian men and women has won the 
confidence of our people, and is making its influence felt 
for good in some of our most destitute sections. 

Then here is Buie's Creek Academy whose phenominal 
growth and glorious record for scholarship and Christian 
culture thrills our hearts wiih gratitude for such gracious 
opportunities afforded our boys and girls who seek the 
best. 

And the C. B, F. Institute, that for these sixty years 
has been a great beacon light to our eastern counties, 
and not a bit bent by the burden of years, nor lagging on 
account of age, but "her youth is being renewed like the 
eagle's", and her influence for good increasing with the 
years. 

And right here at us is the Oxford Seminary, our Shad- 
rach, Meshach, and Abednego that the flames could not 



15 

devour, bat through them she came gloriously purified 
and fitted far better for tlie noble work she is doing. 

And now — my language fails me — here is Wake Forest 
College, and wiiat shall I say ? The great boon of the 
Baptist hosts of North Carolina for three quarters of a 
century. Her buildings are beautiful monuments of 
fame erected through the loyalty and love of her sons. 
Her benedictions are world-wide; the sun never ceases to 
shine on her possessions, and her present prospects and 
plans bespeak for her a far more glorious future of prog- 
ress and power. 

And last, but not least, is the Baptist University for 
Women. Our Sacred Minerva that sprang full grown 
from the severed head of Jove, ''awaking with her battle 
cry the echoes of heaven and earth." The wisdom god- 
dess and goddess of dawn dispelling darkness and awak- 
ing to light, and graciously fostering every worthy in- 
dustry. 

These are bright prospects for the future of our people 
and with a regenerated and re-adjusted home environ- 
ment that would give them a student body free from re- 
bellion against the laws of God and of these institutions, 
we should have indeed, not in infidelity, but in our Chris- 
tian, education, the "seven hued arch of hope" that would 
save the world. • 

Bro. Dunavvay, of Flat River, was welcomed to a seat 
among us. 

Association adjourned for dinner. Benediction by 
Bro. Ayscue. 



Tuesday Afternoon, 3:00 P. M, 
Association met and led in prayer by Bro. Heilig. 
Brethren Kesler, Blanchard and Justice were welcomed. 

Report on Orphanage was read by Bro. Craig and dis- 
cussed by Bro. Kesler, and a collection in cash and pledges 
taken as follows: 

N. Biggs.......... $10.00 Monnt Zion..... ....$5.00 

T. J. Taylor..... .10,00 W^alter Alien (paid)... 5.00 

Poplar Springs 10.00 Cedar Rock 5.00 

F. C. Ferguson vpaid). 10.00 Fishing Creek............ 5.00 

O. L. Pittman... 10.00 Middleburg (paid)...... 6.00 

T.J.Jenkins 10.00 W. H. Kimball (paid). 1,00 

Maple Springs....... 10.00 G. M. Duke (paid) 1.00 



16 

Hickory.... .$10.00 Hat Collection $ i.OO 

Louisburg 10.00 

Samaria 10.00 Total $155.00 

South Henderson........ 5.00 

After which the report was adopted. 

Report on The Orphanage. 

The Orphanage is twenty-two years old. During last 
year it sheltered three hundred and seventy-three chil- 
dren and had present at the Annual Meeting three hun- 
dred and forty-three. We have now three hundred and 
fifty, with room for perhaps twenty more children. Since 
last year one new dormitory has been added, now making 
ten in all. A Tabernacle has been built, with a seating 
capacity of two thousand, which is admirably suited for 
our Annual Meeting and all our services during the hot 
summer months. The Noah Richardson Library Build- 
ing is ready for the roof. Work is already begun on the 
new Infirmary and it is expected that this building will 
be closed in by the cold weather. The health of the in- 
stitution has been excellent, only one or two cases of seri- 
ous sickness during the entire year, and v/e begin a new 
year in our school work with better j)rospects than ever 
before. Last year the old debt was practiceJly paid off, 
but we are sorry to report that since that time the regu- 
lar contributions have not been large enough to meet the 
running expenses. The pledges of last year are not large 
enough to tak<^ care of the Orphanage during the year 
before us. The number of children has increased and the 
cost of living has not grown less, but has increased with 
our numbers. When the current fund runs below five 
hundred and fifty dollars a week, we are running behind, 
and this will be greater as the number grows. 

The Orphanage comes before the Association this year 
without any special cry of distress. We have had no ep- 
idemics, no destructive fires, no great debt to report. So 
we cannot go into hysterics over any of these things for 
collection purposes. All we have to offer is a year of 
prosperity and three hundred and fifty children. We be- 
lieve that this is appeal enough to right thinking people 
to insure sufficient contributions to save us from another 
debt. We urge a better organization of our Sunday- 
schools around the Orphanage work. A club of Charity 
and Children in every Sunday-school and a collection 



17 

once a month from every one of these schools is the cry. 
And we urge also a special effort at Thanksgiving in ev- 
ery church. Our Thanksgiving offering last year v*^as the 
best in the history of the institution. We trust we have 
reached the time when Thanksgiving Day in all our 
churches means Orphannge Day, R,nd that giving to the 
Orphanage shall be our finest expression of Thanksgiving. 

We are making a special appeal to the women of our 
State to build a new Infirmary. It is to be called ''The 
Woman's Building." This building is greatly needed for 
tv7o reasons: First, because the old Infirmary is totally 
inadequate, and in the second place, the old Infirmar}" 
can be used for another purpose which is greatly needed. 
It Avill then be the central sewing building. So by build- 
ing the new Infirmary we gain two objects — an up-to- 
date Infirmary and a pla.ce where sewing may be taught. 
and our mending and making of clothes systematized, 
tliereb}" giving much needed relief to the work of the 
matrons. . 

Our work increases every year, making it necessary to 
add these improvements. They do not add luxuries to 
the Orphanage but simnly aid to its efiicienc}" m the work 
of training the boys and girls committed to our care. 

.Respectfully submitted, 

Braxton Craig, 

Report on Periodicals was read by Pro. Lumpkin for 
Bro. Hocutt. Bro. Blanchard, editor of The Recorder, 
Bro.S. F. Conrad, field editor of the ITorth Carolina Baptist, 
and Bro. J. D. Hufham, made addresses, after which the 
report was adopted. 

Report on Periodicals. 

Paul in writing to Timothy says: '"Till I come give at- 
tendance to reading, to exhortation, to doctrine. . Medi- 
tate upon these things; g-ive thyself wholly to them, that 
they profiting may appear to all." As we read we are 
apt to tliink and act. Good literature is a strong factor 
in making the man or the nation. Our denominational 
literature brings us in closer touch one with the other, 
and helps us to understand the field before us. Our Bap- 
tist literature is second to none, North or South, and 
throughout the land they 8.,ve looked upon as a reading 
and a progressive people. 

The "Home Field" and "Foreign Mission Journal" have 



18 

their places in our deiiominational life and are essential. 
to the growth and prosperity of the Baptist cause. The 
"Foreign Mission Journal" should be read by all Mis- 
sionary Societies. 

"Charity and Children" stands for the feeding, cloth- 
ing and educating of the orphan children of our State, and 
Avill live through the ages to come. To read this paper 
makes one's heart and nature tender toward the weak and 
helpless. This paper should be read by every Sunday- 
school student in the State. 

The Biblical Recorder is the organ of the Baptist State 
Convention. It has stood for truth and righteousness 
these years. It has a glorious record in the past and a 
greater to come. Among all the religious papers of our 
land none have taken a higher stand in scholarship and 
soundness. The Recorder should be taken in every Bap- 
tist home in our State. Your committee recommends to 
the delegates and visitors of the Tar River Association 
that they help to put The Recorder in the hands of our 
people. J. E. HoGUTT. 

B}' motion of Bro. Huffham the North Carolina Baptist 
was included in the report. 

Bro. Pittman offered a resolution which was deferred, 
and a resolution by Bro. Lumpkin that a committee be 
appointed with Bro. T. M. Pittman, chairman, T. J. Tay- 
lor, G. M. Duke. I. M. Mercer, and Bro. Lumpkin was 
added, to consider the plan, boundaries, etc., for the 
formation of a new Association, to report to-morrow at 
10 o'clock. 

Adjourned. Prayer by Bro. Jenkins. 



Tuesday Night, 7:30 o'clock. 

Association, upon re-assembling, M^as led in prayer by 
Justice. 

Delegate to Southern Baptist Convention, T. M. Ar- 
rington. 

Brethren J. T. Jenkins, I. M. Mercer, M. C. Walton, 
were elected as delegates to the Baptist State Convention. 

Report on Home Missions was read by Bro. Brooks, dis- 
cussed by Bro. Brooks and Bro. Blanchard, and resolu- 
tion by Bro. Lumpkin that we undertake to raise $2,500 
for this Board during this year. Report adopted. 



19 

Report on Home Missions. 

When Southern Baptists withdrew from the Triennial 
Convention in 1845 they not only asserted their right to 
send a slave-ovv'^ner to do Foreign Mission work, but as- 
sumed the responsibility of taking care of the Soutii. A 
Board of Domestic Missions was created wiih Basil Manly 
at its head. When Dr. Kerfcot became president of the 
Board in .1882 the location of the Mission Rooms was 
changed from Marion, Alabama, to Atlanta, Georgia. 
Today, with W. W. Landrum president and R. T. Gray 
corresponding secretary, the responsibility is as great 
and the work as effectual as ever. There are 866 jnission- 
aries at present. They are building churches at the rate 
of 300 a year, and last year baptized 19,000 souls. The 
Baptists have not lost the Southern cause. The citizens of 
Massachusettst attribute he high financial rating of their 
State to the excellent schools established in every town- 
ship. The South is increasing in wealth at the rate of 
$7,000,000 per day. Her best product,, ho^vever, is the 
men and woinen that have g;rowii up in harmony with the 
churches and schools and in s.ympatby with the orphan- 
age work. Laymen are applying business principles to 
religious service, perhaps, as never before. There is an 
urgent demand for Christian vigilance and activity; 

1. We are unwilling for Northern philanthropists to 
solve the race problem in their way. 

2. We are unwilling for the Roman Catholics fco sow, 
cultivate, and harvest our seaport towns. 

3. We are unwilling for foieign immigrants to set up 
social a.nd religious standards for our children. 

4. We wish to teach our protestant brethren the doc- 
trine of the competency of the soul, and a correct ob- 
servance of the ordinances. 

6. We wish to evangelize the whole South. New 
churches are to be organized and weak ones strengthen- 
ed. The proper use of pare and undefiled religion in the 
home land, with its inter-change and exchange of citi- 
zens, means much toward christianizing the world. 

C. V. Brooks, for the Committee. 

Report of Historian was read by Clerk for Bro. Duke as 
follows: 

Dear Brethren: — After years of waiting I hope the his- 
tory is in sight. Hope to have it published by first of 



20 

New Ye€ir. Would ask Association to appoint a commit- 
tee to examine history and confer witii Historian as to the 
best means of publishing-. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. M. Duke. 

Report received and committee appoined: T. M. Pitt- 
man, T. J. Taylor, Ivey Allen. 

Bro. Larkiu, former pastor of the church; Brethren 
Stevens and Stradiey, of Flat River; Cullom and Poe, of 
Wake Forest, and Bro. Craven, pastor M. El. Church, 
were recognized by the Moderator and invited to seats. 

The use of the M. P. Church was kindly tendered to the 
Association and received with grateful acknowledg- 
Hients of the body. 

Report on Temperance was order for the hour and re- 
port was read by Bro. Mercer for the chairman, which 
was followed by a most forceful address by Bro. Davis, 
and a cash collection of |130.00 and pledges to amount of 
|13.00 was taken to help him in the prosecution of his no- 
ble work, after which tlie report was adopted. 

Report on 7 emperance. 

We not only ''re-affirm our former position on the sub- 
ject of Temperance," but we bog to urge a more earnest 
and widespread effort by our pastors to impress Bible 
Temperance on the hearts of our people and the general 
public, for it seems from reports from various parts of 
our Slate that we have not been as successful in our ef- 
forts as others have been, or else we have more to do than 
others. It appears from reports published recently in 
various papers that the counties within the borders of the 
Tar River Association have at least half as many saloons 
now as all the balance of 1he State put together. This 
surely puts us in a responsible position and argues that 
we should bestir ourselves to the greatest possible extent 
to use every legitimtxte effort to bring our section upon 
equality with the Temperance progress of this "Baptist 
State.'" We would, therefore, recommend that our pas- 
tors preach and that our laymen and pastors co-operate 
with the other Christian people of this State in teaching 
anrl ei":forcing its Christian Temperance principles upon 
the public conscience. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John T. Jenkins, Chairman. 

Adjourned. • Benediction by Bro. Kesler. 



21 



Wednesday, 0:30 o'clock. 



Association met tind led in praise service by Bro. Dowell. 
Minutes of yesterday read, corrected, and adopted. A 
telegram, was received froiri Bro. Doan, pastor of the 
church, who is away on account of illness of his wife- 
Hebrews IStli chapter and 21st verse. The Clerk was in- 
structed to respond to said telegram with assurances of 
our prayers and tenderest sympathies. 

The Committer on New Churches reported as follows: 

Your committee, appointed to examine articles of faith 
of the churches which have ■i^pplied for admission with 
this Association and the church covenant of the same. 
beg to report that we examined the same and recommend 
that Mount Herman, Arlington Street, Oregon, and 
Sharpesburg be received with our membership smd the 
right hand of fellowship be given the delegates. 

Ct. T. Lumpkin, 
Geo. J. Dowell, » 
A. C. Griffin. 

The Moderator gave the hand of fellowship to the del- 
egates. 

The Committee appointed to report on New Associa- 
tion reported as follows: 

Report on New Association. 

To The Tar River Association:— 

Your committee to consider the resolution contemplat- 
ing a division of the Association, respectfully report: 

1 That the differing conditions and diverse interests 
of the Eastern and Western portions of the Association, 
and the large extent of its territory render a division 
proper and inevitable. 

2. Such division ought to be along lines that will as- 
sure strength and efficiency to boi'.'. tiie old and new- 
bodies. 

3. We recommend that the Clerk of this body be in- 
structed, by the adoption of this report, m issue letters to 
all the churches situated east of the main line of the At- 
lantic Coast Line liailway and such other churcJies west 
of that line as may desire them, for the organization of a 
new Association. 

4. That the present missionary enterprises of this As- 
sociation be continued under the direction of the present 



N 



22 

Executive Committee until November, 1908, and at that 
time the Treasurer of this Association turn over to tlie* 
Treasurer of the new Association all funds which are 
now in, or shall come to his hands for Associational Mis- 
sions, then remaining unexpended. 

5. That the Executive Committee to be appointed at 
this session shall be chosen from the churches remaining 
Avith this body: and, as this division may place the pres- 
ent Moderator with the new Association, that a Vice- 
Moderator be elected at this time, who shall succeed him 
in such event. 

6. That this report be a||ubstitute for the pending res- 
olution. Thos. M. Pittman, 

G. M. Duke, 

G. T. LUM'^KINj 

I. M. Merger, 
T. J. Taylor. 

After amendments the report was adopted. 

The report on Education was read by Bro, J. K. Hen- 
derson, which, after discussion by Bro. Henderson , was 
adopted. ;See report on page 14.) 

The special hour having arrived for Associational Mis- 
sions the report was read by Bro. Lumpkin for the chair- 
man, Bro. G. M, Duke, which, after discussion by breth- 
ren Ragland, Brooks, Henderson, Walton, Lumpkin, 
Duke and Hufham. the roll of churches was called and 
the following sums were pledged: 

Scotland Neck $600.00 New Bethel $25.00 Oak Leve'. $15.00 

North Kocky Mount ISO.W Philadelphia 2.5.00 Peach Tree 15.00 

Rocky Moujit 150.00 Baraca Class, Wilson... 25.00 Red Bud 15.00 

Wilson loO.'iO Sandy Creek 28.00 Reedy Creek 35.00 

Henderson 125.00 Spring Hope 25.00 Rock Spvinjf 15.00 

Greenville 125.00 Tarboro 25.00 Ros«mary „ 15.00 

Weldon 100.00 Tiilery 25.00 South Henderson 15.00 

Louisttlrg- 100. (H) Warren Plains 25.00 V/arrenton W. M. So 15.00 

Wai-renton 75.0C Ephesus 20.00 Greenville W. M. So 15.00 

StonyCreek 65.00 Fishing Creek 20.00 Antioch „ ' 12.00 

Poplar Springs 55.00 Geth&emene 24.00 Bethel 12.60 

Brown's 50.00 Hamilton. 20.00 Macedonia 12.50 

Enfield 50.00 Hickory 20.00 RobeiKonville 12.50 

Williams:„n 50.00 V/arren Plains 20.00 E-veretts 11.50 

Washington 50.00 Joyner's 20.00 Whitakers liSO 

Roanoke Rapids 50.00 Middleburg 20.00 Bethlehem 10.00 

Red Oak ;^5.C0 Plymouth 20.00 Conoho lO.OO 

Cedar Rock 30.00 Samaria 20.00 Eagles lO.OO 

Elm City 35.00 Gary Chapel 18.00 Ebenezer 10.00 

Dawson's -30.00 Arlingrton Street 15.00 Turkey Branch 10.00 

Sharon 30.00 Aurora.... 15.00 Halifax lO.OO 

Bear Chapef 2.5.00 Battleboro 15.00 Marmaduke 10.00 

Cypress Swamp 25.00 Castalia 15.00 Mildred 10.00 

Gardner's 25.00 Cedar Branch 1.5.0O Mount Hebron lO.OO 

Harris.^ Chapel 25.00 Conoconara. 1.5.00 Oregron 10.00 

Macon 25.00 Connth 15.00 Pactolus 10.00 

Maple Spring-s 2.5.00 Hobgood 1.5.00 A-'au^han 10.00 

Mount Zion 25.00 Hew Hope 16.00 Enterprise 10.00 

Nashville 25.00 North Henderson 15.00 Quankie iO.Ol 



23 

Sharpsburg- $10.00 L. M. S., Fish. Creek... $ G.()0 Ry. Mt. Baraca Class $ 5.00 

Ladies' 3. S., Tarboro... 10.00 Hickory M. S 5.00 Soot. Neck Study Ckss.. 5.00 

Rocky Mt. Sun. School. 10.00 Elm Grove 5.00 Fishing- Creek W. M. S... 5.00 

Speed 10.00 New Sandy Creek 5.00 Gardner's VV. M. S 5.00 

Greenville Sunbeams. .. 10.00 Pinev Grove 5.00 A. C. Griffin 5.00 

Stanhope' 10.00 Riddick's Grove 5.00 Warren Plains M. S 5.00 

Sulphur Springs 10.00 Social Plains 5.00 Sandy Creek M. S 5.00 

Tarboro Sun. School 1,5.00 White Level ,5.00 Mount Zion M. S 5.00 

Ladi&s' M. S.. Ry. Mt 15.00 No. Henderson W.M.S.. 5.00 J. A. Mustian 2.c0 

Scot. Neck W. M. S 15.00 Stoney Creek S. S 10.00 J. H. Pope .5.C0 

Midway 7.00 Y. L. Aid, S. War'ton.. 5.00 

Maple Spring-s W. M. S. 6.00 Roanoke Rapids S. S 5.00 Total $3,366.50 

After which the report was adopted. 

Report on Associationa! Missions. 

To me has been assigned the duty of writing the report 
on this subject in which we have been so long engaged, 
and which our Lord has so abundantly blessed. The 
steady growth and the continued interest manifested by 
our churches and the cheerfuhiess with wliich they 
have given to its support all are evidences to the writer 
of the Divine favors. Under the blessings of God, we 
have a very encouraging report to make. From all the 
missionaries come good news. 

During the year there have been engaged in this work 
twenty men for part or all of their time, and from these 
we submit the following reports: 

Brother B. T. Bunn has been preaching at Mount Ver- 
non, in Nash county. He has baptized six, received by 
letter four, is building a house of worship for which they 
need help very much. Outlook for the future fine. 

Brother T. J. Crisp has been preaching at Conoho and 
Piney Grove churches, Martin county. He has baptized, 
fifteen and received by letter two. Outlook on this field 
is very encouraging. 

Rev. G. W. Coppedge has been preaching at Midway, 
Nash county. There have been thirty additions. Fine 
congregations, good Sunday-schools, w^ork encouraging. 

Eev. A. G. Willcox has been laboring in the upper end 
of Halifax. Five added to th? churches, and work en- 
couraging. 

Brother O. N. Marshall has been preaching at North 
and South Henderson. He has baptized forty-one. The 
churches are growing. Work is in excellent condition. 

Brother J. K. Henderson, our missionary at Rosemary 
and Roanoke Rapids, reports baptisms nineteen, and by 
letter eighteen. We are glad to note such growth and 
interest on this field, and hope soon to see the churches 
self-sustainine'. 



2-i 

Brother W. G. Hall has been doing work at several im- 
portant points in Martin county. Ha,s added eleven by 
baptism and three by letter. He reports all of his work 
in fine condition. 

Brother T. J. Ragland is our missionary in Beaufort 
county. He reports, baptisms twenty-five, additions by 
letter six. A tine report from this field. 

Brother J. L. Rogers has been preaching at Whitakers 
and Gethsemene. He has baptized seven, and reports the 
outlook hopeful. 

Brother J. A. Sullivan has recentljf gone to "Washing- 
ton. In this short time he repoi-ts twelve baptisms and 
eight additions by letter. This is one of the hard fields, 
and this glorious report makes our heart glad. 

Brethren J. I). Howell and L. J. Kirk have been supply- 
ing th«^. field around Hobgood. They have done good 
work, and there have been glorious results. 

Brother L. J. Powell, of the Louisville Seminary, spent 
four months in evangelistic work in the Association. The 
Board sent him to some of the most difficult fields in the 
Association, and everywhere he was blessed with won- 
derful results. 

If any of the results have not been reported it is be- 
cause I have not been able to get the information. 

Brethren, this is the best report we have ever had, and 
so signally has the Lord blessed the labors of our godly, 
cons-^crated men that we feel like pausing in our work 
and lifting oar hearts in praise to God for the large num- 
ber of conversions that have come from these dilficult 
fields. These things should move us to continued praise 
and encourage us to greater efforts. Ours is a great God 
and our faith in Him should lead us to ask great things 
of Him, expect great things from Him, and attempt 
great things for Him. 

With such opportunities before us and such obligations 
upon us, your commattee could not ask the churches to 
pledge less than $3,000 for this work. 

Brethren of the Tar River Association, you have hon- 
ored and listened to me many times in the past, I believe 
you love and respect me now. I come before you once 
more, in the name of my dear Lord, to plead again for the 
destitute sections about us. Let us again stand together 
as in the past to give to them the gospel we so much 
love. Respectfully, 

G. M. Duke. 



25 

Bro. Hiifham stated tlie needs of the church at Aurora, 
and a collection in cash and pledges as below was given 
to our faithful missionary, Bro. Rag:land: O. L. Pittman 
(paid), $10.00; C. J. Austin, $5.00; JTa. Kelly, $10.00; Bro. 
Rich (paid), $10.00; E. W. Shearin (paid), $5.00; Miss Nan- 
nie Wilson, $1.00; K Biggs, $25.00; Mrs. S. B. Briggs, 
$1.00: T. J. Taylor, $1.00; Cash, $52.45. Total, $120.45. , 

Adjourned for dinner. 



Wednesday Afternoon, 3:00 o'clock. 

The Association was led in prayer by Bro. Stradley. 

Treasurer of Executive Committee offered his report, 
which was referred to Bro. Pittman to audit, who after- 
wards reported examined and approved same. 

Report of Treasurer of Executive Committee. 

The Tar River Association 

In account with N. Biggs, Treasurer. 

Oct. 1, 1907. 

Cash Rev. G-eo. W. Coppedge....... $ 40.00 

D. T. Bunn 25.00 

^ T.J.Crisp 150.00 

M. C. Walton 200.00 

T. J. Ragiand 400.00 

T. L.Vernon 50.00 

G. L. Merrell ; 300.00 

A. G. WiJlcox 150.00 

S. L. Morgan 25.00 

Geo. J. DoVell 75.00 

W. G. Hall 343.45 

J. L. Kirk 75.00 

L. J. Powell.. , 250.00 

J. W. Nobles 250.00 

J. D.Howell 100.00 

J. E. Heilig 210.00 

J. L. Cline 10.00 

J. T. Jenkins 20.00 

L. M. Cokeland 13.75 

A. T. Hardee 12.70 

I. M. Mercer 216.65 

T, J. Ragiand 50.00 

To mistake Orphanage, Mrs. O. L. 

Pitman 5.00 $2,971.55 

4 



2(J 

To Am-t brought forward $2,971.55 

Oct. 12, 1906. 

By amount on hand this day $ 2oG.7.3 

Hobgood 15.00 

8peed — 3.68 

Washington 50.00 

South Rocky Mount 5.00 

Association 2,398.35 

Ehn City 2.55 

Ephesus". 20.00 

Ladies' Aid, Littleton 5.00 

A. G. Willcox 18,00 

Ladies' Aid, Scot. Neck... 11.00 
Mis. Study Class, S. Neck 2.40 
Loiiisburg Church 73.50 $ 2,861.27 

Oct. 1, 1907. To am't due this day $ 110.28 

Examined and found correct. 

Thomas M. Pittmak. 

Treasurer of Association read his report with the re- 
port of Bro. C. J. Austin, which was adopted. 

Report of Treasurer of Association. 

The Tar River Association 

In account with A. G. Willcox, Treasurer. 
October, 1906. 

To balance due Association at last session.. $ 1.83 

Rec'd from Committee for State Missions 18.78 

'• " '' Home Missions 21.10 

" " " Foreign Missions 64.00 

" " '' Education 33.45 

'• Orphanage 95.81 

" " " Sunday-School Missions 4.45 

" *• " Aged Ministers 23.65 

'' Minutes 94.76 

" Cash Collection for Orphanage 26.66 

" Watson House 10.00 

" " " " Associational Mis.. 13.50 

'* Ephesus Ch. for '' " 20.00 

" " Orphanage 2.25 

*' " " Aged Ministers 2.25 

*' '' Minutes 1.00 



Amount carried forward $433 .49 



■27 

Amount brought forward $433.40 

Eec'd from Washington for Minutes 1.50 

" " Social Plains for Associational Mis 5.00 

" *' " •' '' Orphanage 2.05 

'•' " •' •' " Minutes.. ^75 

Total $442.79 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

By am't paid Walters Durham State Missions $ 18.78 

*' " " " " Home Missions 21.10 

" *' '' •' " Foreign Missions... 64.00 

'• " " '- *•■ Education 33.45 

" " " " *• Orphanage 98.81 

'•' " " " " Aged Ministers 23.65 

'■' '' " " " Sun School Mis..... 4.45 

" " " Arch. Johnson cash col. Orphanage. . 26.66 

" " " " " "■ WatsoL. House... 10.00 

" " " N. Biggs cash col. Associatioaal Mi? 13.50 

" " " '■' •*' Asso. Mis., Ephesus Ch...... 20.00 

" ^' ••' " " " " Social Plains 5.00 

** " " Walters Durham Orphanage, Ephesus 2.25 

'' " •' " " Aged Ministers " 2.25 

" >' •' S. H. Averitt, for Social Plains 2.05 

" " "■ ISTash Bros., for printing Minutes 65.00 

" '' " Clerk'sfee 25.00 

" " " Expenses on same.. 1.60 

" '• " Blank Ch. Letters and distributing... 1.25 

Total $438.80 

To balance due Association this day 3.99 

$442.79 
Respectfully submitted. — 

A. G. WiLLCOX, Treasurer, 
Examined and approved. 

C. J. Austin. 

Committee on Time and Place reported; Samaria; 
time, Tuesday after first Sunday in October, 1908, (which 
was afterward changed to Sandy Greek; time, Tuesday 
after fourth Sunday in October, 1908); Bro. G. JM. Duke to 
preach introductory sermon, Bro. J. P. Bowers alternate. 

Bro. G. M. Duke elected Vice-Moderator. 

The following resolution was off ere 1 by Bro. J. K. 
Henderson: 

"Since one important part of the work of Wake 



m-' 



Forest College is to fit and prepare young men called 
of God to preach the gospel, and in view of the fact 
that this great department of the work of that noble 
institution was not especially mentioned in the report 
on Education or discussed by this body, lest we for- 
get our obligation to endorse and support this great 
work, 

"Resolved, That it is eminently fitting and proper 
that this body urge upon its pastors and delegates 
this important work before the individual churches 
and appeal to thena for their loyal support." 

Report on Aged Ministers next claimed the attention of 
the body and the report was read by Bro. Willis, who, 
with brethren Hufham and Dowell, discussed the report, 
which was afterward adopted. 

Report on Ministers' Relief Board. 

Our Board, now In its seventeenth year, is doing good 
work and making steady and substantial development. 
One third of the gifts from the churches is added to tiie 
permanent interest-bearing fund, amounting now to more 
than $6,000. The churches contributed last year $2,476.90. 
Thirty-one families receive help from the Board. The 
name of each beneficiary and amount received is given in 
the Minutes of our State Convention. The largest amount 
given is $95.00 and the smallest $17.50. Last year the 
churches of the Tar River Association gave $284.10 — for- 
ty-five churches contributing and fifty-one reporting no 
gifts to this Board. We recommend that the pastors and 
delegates be urged to bring to the attention of their 
churches the object and importance of this work and the 
sacredness of their obligation to care for the ministers 
who stand in need of help. H. A. Willis. 

The report on Sunday-schools was offered by Bro. T. J. 
Taylor, which was adopted. 

Report on Sunday-Schools. 

The churches of the Tar River Association are commit- 
ted to the work of Sunday-schools. There is therefore 
no need for presenting proof to establish the Scriptural- 
ness of this department of our denominational work. 
There was a time when our churches were divided on this 
subject; but happily that is in the past. There may be 



29 

one here and there who is opposed to Sunday-schools, but 
this opposition does not seriously atfect the cause. Our 
greatest trouble grows out of the fact that many of our 
people in theory favor Sunday-schools but oppose them 
in practice. 

Statistics show that a very small per cent, of our mem- 
bers attend Sunday-schools. This practical indifference 
greatly hinders the work. The ideal church is the one all 
of whose members attend the Sunday-school, but I have 
never known one of that kind. The Sunday-school should 
be under the control of the church, and efforts should be 
made to make every member feel under ol:)liga.tions to 
engage in this delightful work. 

In their letters to the Association several of our church- 
es do not report a Sunday-school. This condition of 
things ought not longer exist; for a Baptist church that 
has no Sunday-school is not loyal to the teaching and re- 
quirement of the Word of God. Every church should 
have a Sunday-school, and in many instances more than 
one. The Sunday-school is the teaching service of the 
church. Here the members should meet and study the 
word of God, and while they are teaching each other they 
should diligently strive to sow the seed of divine truth in 
the minds of the unconverted both old and young. The 
Sunda3-school cannot make Christians, but if the Word 
of God is faithfully taught the Holy Spirit will use it in 
the saving of souls. 

We earnestly urge every church to have an ever-green 
Sunday-school, and to use in the study of the Scriptures 
the Sunday-school literature published by the Sunday- 
school Board of the Southern Baptist Convention or the 
American Baptist Publication Society, We also urge 
that distinctive Baptist doctrines be taught in all the 
classes. T, J. Taylor. 

The Finance CoKimittee offered their report as follows; 

We have received for 

Assoceational Missions $2,510.41 

State Missions.- 54.57 

Home Missions „ 33,19 

Foreign Missions , 23.49 

Ministerial Education 15.60 

Orphanage 46,65 

Carried forward. „ $2,683,91 



30 

Brought forward $2,683.91 

Aged Ministers Relief 16.20 

Colportage 1.00 

Sunday- School Missions 3. 50 

Miss Abernathy 2.00 

Minutes.- 9-1.80 

Total $2,801.41 

IvEY Allen, For Committee. 

Individuals. 

A. C. Griffin $ 5.00 

T. L. Vernon 5.00 

Rev. G. M. Duke . 10.00 

W. T. Regis 5.00 

Maple Springs M. S 5.00 

The Clerk was instructed to have usual number of 
Minutes printed and receive usual compensation. 
Adjourned. 



Wednesday Night, 7:30 o'clock. 

Association rnet and was led in prayer by Bro, Wil- 
liams. The special order for the hour was Woman's 
Work, and the report was offered by Bro. Ayscue, A'^-ho, 
with Bro. Geo. Dowell, made addresses, after which the 
report was adopted. 

Report on Woman's Work. 

The Woman's Work during the year has made encour- 
aging progress. Last year the Woman's Missionary So- 
cieties planned to make a considerable advance, and 
pledged themselves to raise $2,000.00 during the year. In 
addition to this the Societies of the Association decided 
to adopt as their beneficiary Miss Gertrude Abernethy, 
and pledged themselves to pay .$150.00 for her support at 
the Louisville Training School, where she is preparing for 
work on the foreign field. The report shows that they 
have more than met all their pledges, contributing to the 
different objects of the Convention $2,306.48, and to the 
support of Miss Abernethy $165.00: 
^LasD year there were thirty-six Woman's Missionary 
Societies, ten Sunbeam Bands, and four Young Ladies' 
Societies, in the Association. Now there are forty-five 



31 " 

Woman's Missionary Societies, eleven Sunbeam Bands, 
and six Young Ladies' Societies. 

That the workers are encouraged is evident from what 
the Societies are planning for this year. They are under- 
taking to surpass last year's W(U-k by increasing their 
contributions thirty-three and one third per cent. This 
means that they will raise this year nearly $3,000.00, 

But while the work is very encouraging the fact re- 
mains that more than half of the churches in the Associ- 
ation have no Woman's Missionary Societies, The great- 
est lack ar.d therefore the greatest need is in the country 
churches. Each pastor is prayerfully urged- to do all in 
his power to help organize a Society in each church. 

This afternoon there was held an enthusiastic Woman's 
Meeting. At that meeting the following recommenda- 
tions were adopted: {!.) That each Society have a Mis- 
sion Study Class. (2.) That all members be urged to take 
the Foreign Mission Journal, Mission Field, and the Home 
and Field. (3.) That a special effort be made to form new 
Societies and to double the membership this year. (4.) 
That contributions be increased 33^ per cent. (5.) That 
we contribute $176.00 to the support of Miss Abernethy, 
(6.) That hearty co-operation of every Auxilliary in the 
support of Miss Lanneau. (7.) That efforts be made to 
increase our Sunbeam work. (8.) That all money pledged 
shall be left in the hands of the Vice-Presidents, and 
that they shall decide the proportionate part of each As- 
sociation. John E. Atscue. 

During the year our loved brother, J. K. Howell, "fell 
on sleep" and brethren Hufha^m and Dowell spoke of his 
glorious life work, and Bro. Hufham is to prepare for 
Minutes a sketch of his life and labors, 

Bro. Brooks offered the following resolution, which was 
adopted by a rising vote. 

"Resolved, That the members of the Tar River As- 
sociation hereby express their gratitude to the Hen- 
derson church and her friends for their generous en- 
tertainment." 

Beautifully touching, tender, loving words were spoken 
by brethren Alderman.;, Hufham, Taylor and our loved 
Moderator. 

"How firm a foundation ye saints of the Lord" was 
sung and prayer by Bro.. Hufham, and Moderator declar- 



32 

ed the Association adjourned to meet with the church at 
Sandy Greek, Franklin county, Tuesday after fourth Sun- 
day in October, 1908. 

T. M. Arrington, Moderator. 
A. G. WiLLCOX, Clerk. 




33 



Tar River Association — Times and Places of Meetings. 



1. Sandy Creek. Franklin county, commencing on 
fourth Sunday in October, 1831. 

2. Maple Spiings, Franklin county, comtnencing on 
Thursday before fourth Sunday in October, 1832. 

3. Hickory Chapel, I^Tash county, Thursday before 
fourth Sunday in October, 1833. 

4. Brown's, Warren county, Sa^turday before fourth 
Sunday in October, 1834. 

5. Red Bud. Franklin county, Friday before fourth 
Sunday iu October, 1835. 

6. Shiloh, Franklin county, 23-25th of October, 1836. 

7. Peach Tree, Nash county, Saturday before fourth. 
Sunday in October, 1837. 

8. Reedy Creek, Warren countv, Friday before fourth 
Sunday in October. 1838. 

9. Flat Rock, Franklin county , Saturday before fourth 
Sunday in October, 1839. 

10. Bear Swamp, Halifax county, Saturday before 
fourth Sunday in October, iS-tU, 

11. Louisburg, Saturday before first Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1841. 

12. Gardner's, Warren county, October, 1842. 

13. Poplar Spring, Franklin county, Friday before first 
Sunday in October, 1843. 

14. Brown's, Warren county, Saturday before first 
Sunday in October, 1-44. 

15. Maple Spring, Franklin county, Saturday before 
first Sunday in October, 1845. 

16. Sandy Creek, Franklin county, 24th October, 1846. 

17. Enon, Warren county, Friday before first Sunday 
in October, 1847. 

18. Hickory, Nash county, Friday before first Sunday 
in October, 1848. 

19. Haywood's (now Corinth), Franklin county, Friday 
before first Sunday in October, 1849. 

20. Red Bud, Franklin countj*, Friday after first Sun- 
day in October, 1850. 



5 



:u 

21. Waireiiton, Friday before first Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1851. 

22. Flat Rock, Franklin comity, Friday before first 
Sunday in October, 1852. 

23. Peach Tree, Nash county, Friday before fourth 
Sunday in August, 1853. 

24. Reedy Creek, Warren county, Fridaj^ before fourth 
Sunday in August, 1-54. 

25. Perry's Chepel, Franklin county, Friday before 
fourth Sunday in August, .1855. 

26. Salern, Wilson county, Friday before fourth Sun- 
day in August, 1856. 

27. Gardner's, Warren county, Friday before fourth 
Sunday in August, 1857. 

28. Poplar Spring, Franklin county, Friday after third 
Sunday in August, 1858. 

29. Sharon, Warren county, Friday before fourth Sun- 
day in August, 1859. 

30. Franklinton, Friday bef)re fourth Sunday in Au- 
gust, 1850. 

31. Maple Spring, Franklin county, Friday before 
fourth Sunday in August. 18G1. 

32. Brown's, Warren county, Friday before fourth 
Sunday in August, 1862. 

33. Red Bud, Franklin county, Friday before fourth 
Sunday in August, 18G3. 

34. Minutes for 1864 lost in consequence of the confu- 
sion of the Civil War. 

35. Hickory Chapel, Nash county, Friday before fourth 
Sunday in September, 18G5. 

36. Bear Swamp. Nash county, Friday after first Sun- 
day in October, 1866. 

37. Cypress Chapel, Franklin county, Friday before 
first Sunday in October, 1867. 

38. Red Oak, Nash county, Friday before first Sunday 
in October, 1868. 

39. Sharon, Warren county, Friday after fourth Sun- 
day in October, 1860. 

40. Poplar Spring, Franklin county, Thursday before 
first Sunda}' in October, ] 870. 

41. Haywood's (now Corinth) Franklin county, Thurs- 
day before first Sunday in October, 1871. 

42. Sandy Creek, Franklin county, Thursday before 
first Sunday in October, 1872. 



§5 

43. Wilson, Friday before-? first Sunday in October, 
1873. 

44. Pliiladelphia, Nash county, October 1-3, 1874. 

45. Reedy Creek, Warren county, Thursday before 
first Sunday in October, 1875. 

46. Henderson, September 28-30, 1876. 

47. Pleasant Grove, Nash county, October 4-6, 1877 

48. Conoconara, Halifax county. October 10-12, 1878. 

49. Louisburg, October 9-12, 1879. 

00. Peach Tree, Nash county, October G-8, 1880. 

01. Antioch, Halifax county, 1881. 

52. Littleton, (Jctober 5-7, 1332. 

53. Rock Spring. Franklin county, October 11-13, 1883. 

54. Mount Zion, Ei-anklin county, October 9-11. 1884. 

55. Wilson, October 8-10, 1885. 

56. Brown's, Warren county, October 7-9, 1386. 
57 Samaria, Nash countj^ October 4-G, 1887. 

68. Maple Spring, Franklin county, October 11-13, 1888. 

59. Gardner's, Warren county, October 10 12, 1889. 

60. Greenville, October 9-11, 1890. 
01. Warrenton, October 8-10. 1891. 

62. Louisburg, October 5-7, 1892. 

63. Philadelphia, October 5-7, 1893. 

64. Scotland Neck, October 11-13. 1894. 

65. Wilson, October 9-11, 1895. 

66. Poplar Spriu;2:s. October 7-9, 1896. 

67. Stoney Creek, October 5-7, 1897. 

68. Weidon, October 4-6, 1898. 

69. Warren Plains, October 3-5, 1899.. 

70. Spring Hope, October 16*18, 1900. 

71. Corinth, October 8-10, 1901. 

72. Washington, October 6-8, 1902. 

73. Rocky Mount, October 6-8, 1903. 

74. Maple Springs, October 4-6, 1904. 

75. I'arboro, October 3-6, 1905. 

76. Red Oak, October 9-11, 1906. 

77. Henderson, October 7-9, 1907. 



Rules of Decorum. 

Believing it best to be governed by certain rules and 
regulations in conducting the business of this Associa- 
tion, we adopt the following: 

1. The Association shall be opened and closed with 
prayer. 



36 

2. Not more than one person shall speak at a time, who 
shall rise from his seat and address the Moderator,, 

8. The person thus speaking* shall not be interrupted, 
unless he violates some rule of decorum. 

4. The person speaking shall shall adhere strictly to 
the subject, and in nowise r<"'flect on any other brother. 

5. No brother shall absent himself from the Associa- 
tion without obtaining permission from the body. 

0, No brother shall speak more than twice on the same 
subject without unanimous consent. 

7. No person shall wnisper while a brother is speaking. 

8. The names of the delegates shall be enrolled by the 
Clerk, and called as often as the Association requires. 

9. The Moderator may give his ideas on any subject 
before putting it to the vote, but is entitled to vote only 
in case of a tie. 

10. An order of business shall be made at the begin- 
ning of each session, and shall be changed only by vote 
of the bodv. 



Constitution. 



1. The Association shall be composed of the pastors 
and of the members chosen by the churches, who shall 
produce letters certifying their appointment. Members 
thus chosen and convened, together with the pastors, 
shall be denominated The Tar River Baptist Association, 
which shall have no power over the churches, nor shall it 
infringe on any of their rights. 

2. The letters from the churches shall contain the 
number then in fellowship and those baptized, received 
by letter, dismissed, excluded and died since last Associ- 
ation. 

3. The officers of the Association shall be a Moderator, 
Clerk, Treasurer and Historian, who shall be chosen by 
the suffrages of the members present. 

4. Other churclies, upon petition by letter and by dele- 
gates, and after a satisfactory examination of their Ar- 
ticles of Faith, may be admitted to the body by a un- 
animous vote, when the Mode;rator shall give to their dele- 
gates the right hand of fellowship. 

5. Every church in this Association is entitled to one 
I'epresentative, but no chuich more than three. 

G. Every motion mude and seconded shall be left to the 



37 

discretion of the Association whether it shall be debated 
or not. 

7. The Association shall endeavor to furnish the 
churches with copies of its Minutes. 

8. The Minutes of the Association shall be rea^d and 
approved, and shall l>e signed by the Moderator and 
Clerk before the Association adjourns. 

9. Any church not representing itself in this body for 
three successive sessions, by letter or delegates, shall be 
stricken from the roll of the cJiurches, unless satisfactory 
reasons are assigned. 

10. The Association shall withdraw fellowship from 
any church which shall be found disorderly in faith or 
practice. 

11. A^isiting brethren from sister churches, or similar 
bodies, may be invited to participate in our deliberations. 

12. At each session of the Association delegates to the 
Baptist State Convention and to the Southern Baptist 
Convention shall be chosen by vote. 

13. This Constitution is subject to alteration b}'" a ma- 
jority vote of the delegates enrolled at any session. 

14. The business of the Association shall be conducted 
according to Mell's Parliamentary Practice. 



38 



I -Xi CO O O i^ 'O if^ IC U5 titi O O O O U^i >1 »iO in O O lO o c- to •>! C? i.'S C3 '^ tr*" »rt -^ Ut) oC H C ^ ' 
i T}« M 00 O 00 C: CO -^ ri -^ O O O CO lT; O r-J t£> o o -^ C^ M ^ L-- X- W 00 O * t^ X -H iX to , CO. 

- c^i o aj o o^ CO cs CO ai CO -^ !>i lO t- (N ■rH -^ t^ ts ic * 1 e^ t 




39 



REPORT ON DI3EST OF CHURCH LETTERS. 



CHURCHES 



MEMBERSHIP 



CONTRIBUTIONS 




Antioch 
Arlington Str 

Aux-oro ^ST 

Battlebaro 
Bear Swamp.. # 

Bethe' 

Bethiehen,...* 

Bvowrs •. 

Can' Chapel . .#, 

Castaiia .It 

Cedar Branch.; 
Cedar Rock. * 
Canoconai-a 
C.inoho 

Corinth <£ 

Crocker's Chapel i 
Cypress Chapel 
Dawson's 
Eagle's... 
Ebenezer iffrrriTT. 
Elm City 
Elm Grove 
Enfield ....'.. 
Enterprise j4r. 
Ei-hesus.. ..flf.. 

Everett'.... j; .... 

Fishing Creelerafrrr?r: 

Gardner's. .# 

Gethsemane. 

Greenville 

Halifax . . . .rrr 

Hamilton 

Harris Chapel..i* 

Henderson fl....^..„. 

Hickory :vrf. .'. "T . . JU.t^.. 

Hobg-Qod .r;vr..1^^ 

John's Chapel *. 

Joyner's Chapel... #. 

Littleton •. 

Ivouisburg ..f 
Macedonia 

Maco.T * 

Maple. Springs. .ff, 
Maririaduke. . . .« 
Middleburg ...9t.. 

Midway ♦... 

Mildred .■'.'m 

Mountain Grove 

Mount Kciman.ft 

Mount Hebron 

Mount Zion...A 

Nashville 

New Bethel .« 

New riopei.»«T.-* 

New Sandy Creek**. 

North Henderson.* 

North Rocky MountoKSTf;....! 

Oak Level. fw*?: '^ 

Oregon ...-rrr.rf,'!^... 

Pactolus r:rrrr?rt,.>i 

Peach Tree .6, 

Philadelphia *. 

Piney Grove^rf^'". . . .. 

Pleasant Gi-ovtffr?r! .* 

PllTTlOUth 



40 



REPORT ON DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS.-CONTINUED. 



CHURCHES 


MEMBERSHIP 


CONTRIBUTIONS 






1906 1 

! 


1907 1 

1 


Loss 


iGain 


1906 


1907 


Loss > 


Gain 


Poplar Springs ....P 


1 

360' 
61 

182' 

85 
180 

18 
137 

15; 
141 1 
Jf44 

70| 
291 j 
317' 
405, 
150; 

73! 

99! 

16! 

50i 

40i 
172! 
103 
155 

15 

29! 

76! 

154: 

188 
117 
129 

18| 

43, 

100 

357, 

1' 

10.561 


391 

59 
197 
140 
176; 

16l 
128 

26 
141 i 
365; 

77] 
271, 
3121 
418! 
150l 
6 

82 j 
lloi 

28i 

78, 

40'. 
185 

90' 
139 

15 

31! 

76, 
1601 
198,. 
157: 
131 i 

22; 

60 
112 
345, 

11.205* 


i 

4 

2 
9 

2» 

5 



::;::;:: 

is 

15 

....3. 


31 


278 61 
16 40 

1.108 47 
412 00 
171 43 
2139 
686 81 
84 25 
28160 

3,12fi 51 
20145 
373 45 
148 78 

4.780 83 
54188 

■ i962'9 

"198 63 

77^ 

554 58 

252 52 

858 66 

184 00 

46 45 

770 73 

284 28 

1,593 SS 

i'.'7r7S2 

19 25 

125 

823 54 

6,740 04 

41.43809 


383 44 
70 26 

£60 75 
355 79 
163 33 
7 51 
70147 
128 63 


.: 1 


104 83 


Quankie * 

Red Bud.. .P. 


53 86 


15 
55 

i'i 

21 

7 

13 



6 

9 

16 

12 

28 

13 


847 72 
56 21, 

8 10: 

13 88' 




Red O-ik -i— 1" ■ ■ ?■ ' 




Reedj Creek...* 






14 66 






44 38 


Rock Springs...*.. 


281 60! 
507 881 

54 11; 

23 47' 




2.618 63 

147 34 

348 98 

188 58 

5.539 52 

1.379 44 

872 00 

79 71 

309 31 

135 64 

416 89 

'"769 27 

185 93 

1,125 68 




Rosemary A...' 




Sandy Creek m 


39 80 




758 69 




[ 


837 56 


Social Plains ». 




872 00 




79 71 
119 02 


Speed... »^"r:.-.ri":rr.'.'r 

Spring Hope- .-.Trr." 

Stanhope ...?:r.~.T.r. 




135 64 




218 26 


77 50 




144 79 


^66 59: 

"isioo' 




Tarboro....rr.:/.v.rrrr. 

Tillery . , - ^.v>- 


2 

6 

10 

34 

2 

4 

17 
12 

644 


267 02 


Turkey Branch St 


76 04 

4 50 

395 68 

1.876 46 

1.285 48 

2.186 17 

66iJ2 

1.227 36 
12,98412 

55,02706 


29 59 




106 23 






11140 




' 


28310 






1,285 48 


Weldon ■ — T'Trf^. . . . . 




468 35 


Wliitakers.. r. .::-r:rC: 

White Level ..* 


""!!""j 


46 77 

700 


WiHiamston .- ;.'.77.:: 

Wilson .......,,rfr^.... ....... ...... 

Total 


398 82 
6,244 08 

13.58897 



Your committee finds that 62 churches report a gain in membership of 892. and that 26 
report a loss of 248 members, making a net gain of fj4-l, and a total membership of 11.205. 

W^e find that 55 churches report a gain ir; contributions, including building and repairs, 
of $18,736.70; and that 4J churches report a !o.?s in contrib-otions of $5,147.73 making a net 
gain of $13 588.97, and a total cor.tribution for all objects this year of S55,027.06. Two 
churches report nothing. To the above amounts about $75.C'0, perhaps, should be added for 
minute funds. In many of the letters it was impossible to teil whether "the minute funds 
were included on first page or not. We have one hundred churches. Your committee would 
earnestly request that all amounts be put on the face of the letter, and that all be added up. 
This would save much time to the committee. We further request each pastor to see in which 
column (los.^ or gain) his church falls, and try to put his church in the gain column next 
year. 

Eespectfuily, 

Braxton Craig, 
G. L. Merrei.l. 
S. N. Edwards. 






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Sh-SC 



MINUTES OP THE SEVENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

®ar to^r lapttat Aaaortation 

HELD AT 

SANDY CREEK, ERANIiLIN COUNTY, OCT. 27-29, 1 90S 



The next session to be held with tlie 
churoh at Sharon, Warren county, 
Tuesday after the first Sunday in 
October, 1901). To preach introduc- 
tory sermon, Rev. J. R. Doan, Al- 
ternate, Rev. M. C. Stamps 






OFFICERS 

REV. G. ]\r. DUKE, ]Moderator, Maploville, X. C. 

REV. A. G. WILLCOX, Clerk and Treasurer, . Thinkleyville, N. c. 

The Commonwealth Print, Scotland Neck, N. C. 



I MINUTES or THE SEVENTY-EIGHTH SNNUi\L SESSION 

OF THE 

(Far torr Saptfet Afisnrtatton 

HELD AT 

SANDY CREEK, fRANKUN COUNTY, OCT. 27-29, 1905 



The next session to he held with the 
<rhurrh at Sharon, Warren county, 
Tuesday after the first Sunday in 
October, 1909, To preach introduc- 
tory sermon, Rev. J. R. Doan, Al- 
ternate, Rev, M, C. Stamps 






OFF5CERS 
REV. G. M. DUKE, Moderator, ....,, Mapleviile, X. C. 
REV. A. G. WILLCOX, Clerk and Treasui-er, . Brinkleyvilie, N. C. 

The Commonwealth Print, Scotland Neck, N. G. 



t:z:x:z:2 j 



3 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 



J. T. Taylo)-, T. M. Pittman, J. M. Gaidnei-, G. W. May, Ivey Allen, 
A. W. Peiiy, W. B. Daniel, J. A. Kelly. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 



To Write on Aged Ministers A V. Joyner 

To Write on Orphanage J. R. Doaii 

To Write on Education T. M. Pittman 

'I'o Wiite on Temperance G. W. Coppedge 

'J'o Write on Woman's Work..... R. L. Bennett 

To Write on Periodicals C. C. Williams 

To Write on Sunday Schools W. B. Daniel 

To Write on Our Field Members Executive Committee 

State Mis.sions L. W. Swoop 

Ilornc Missions M. C. Stamps 

J'oreign MLs.sions T. J. Taylor 



SUNDAY SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



D", W. T- Carstarphen. Kittrell, Vance County . . 

W. C. Parker Warrenton, Warren County 

1'hos. B. Wilder. . . .Louisburg', Franklin County 

L. W. Bagley , Littleton, Halifax County 

8 J. Bartholomew Castalia, Nash County 



PASTORS AND POST OFFICE, 

BobbiK, W. M Littleton 

Bo'vpr*^, J. P , ,,.........,... Littleton 

Brown, F, F , , . . . . .Roanoke Rapids 

Bufiu, 1). T Spring Hope 

Creech Worlie Kenley 

Ciillom, W. R Wake Forest 

•^'uppese. G. W Henderson, No. 2 

Duke, G. M .Mapleville 

Doan, J. R , Henderson 

Hocutt. J. E Nashville 

Joyner, A. V Wise 

May, G. ^^' Castalia 

Marshall, 0. N .Henderson 

For, E. D Wake Forest 

Sledge, J. W , Stallings 

Stradley, J. A Oxford 

Seymore Wake Forest 

Swope, L. W Louisburg- 

Tiiylorj T. J. Warrenton 

Tnnstall, Geo .Wake Forest 

Ye-non, T. L Rocky Mount 

Wilcox. 0. C. . ................ . Brinklevville 



Sandy Creek, Frankliu County. 
Oct. 27. 1908. 
The Tar River Association met in its 78th annual session Avith the 

church heie today. 

After n song service by the choir the Association was led in prayer 
by Pirothef C. N. Riggan, after which Brother Duke, the pastor, introduced 
to rhe gre;it congregation Brother J. P. Bowers, who. by appointraent 
preached the opening sermon. Subject, "The Meeting Place Avith Jesus," 
text, Matthew, 27th chapter, 7th verse. 

Aftei tlie sermon the Association was called to order, and Brother 
T. J. Taylor, with earnest, eloquent and burning words, presented the 
name of our beloved brother, G. M. Duke, that matchless preacher, that 
prince in Isi-ael, that living epistle knew and read of all men 
everywhere as moderator of the body. The motion prevailed 
unanimously, and Brother Duke was declared elected. Brother 
Duke in bis own inimitable Avay expressed his profound appreciation of 
the distinguished honor and declared it the happiest day of his life. 

The next business in order was the election of a clerk and treasurer 
of the Association, whereupon Brother J. D. Hufham moved that Brother 
T. M. Pitman, of Henderson, be authorized to cast the vote of the 
Association for A. G. Willcox for clerk and treasurer, that veteran of 
the cros.-. and the man who for 30 years had served the brethren without 
a criticism, wherettpon Brother Wilcox stated that for 37 successive 
year:-' he had attended every session of the Association; that for 30 years 
(save ono^ he had acted as clerk and treasurer, and stated that oAving 
to his infirmity and going so rapidly toAvard the sunset, asked his brethren 
to relieve him and elect a more Avorthy man. Whereui^on, the qttestion 
npon the motion Avas called for, and Brother Pitman cast the vote of 
the Asso'_iation for Brother Wilcox, clerk and treasurer. 

On n.otion of Brother Hufham. Brother T. M. Pitman Avas authorized 
to cast tl'.e vote of the Association for Brother G. M. Duke historian, and 
it Avas so ordered. 

Brother Duke stated to tlie Association that owing to the duties 
incumbent upon him as pastor of the church, that he could not preside 
find asked that he be alloAved the privilege of asking Brother T. M. 
Arrington, our beloved former moderator, to preside, which request i^re- 
vailod and Brother Arrington assumed the chair, and thanked the brethren 
ft>r the honor conferred. 



6 

The clerk then proceeded to call the roll of churches and the 
delegates enrolled as follows: 

Antioeh — 

Bear Swamp — W. E. Bowers, Richard Collins, J. W. Crawley. 

Bethlehem — J. A. Carter, W. D. Harrison. 

Browns — J. W. Smithwick. 

Cary Chapel — 

Castalia— S. J. Bartholomew, T. A. Matthews, W. R. Drake. 

Cedar Rock — Jerome Glasgow, James Fulgam. 

Corinth — John G. Faulkner, Willie Macon, J. E. Collins. 

Crocker Chapel — 

Cypr'^ss Chapel — . 

Enterprise — Fletcher Bobbitt, N. W. Bobbitt, Edie King. 

Ephesus — L. M. Edwards, Eli Creeekman. 

Gardners — 
' Harris's Chapel— W. H. Mabry, Walter Duke, E. S. Shearin. 

Henderson — J. A. Kelly, J. T. Elmore, Thomas M. Pitman. 

John's Chapel — 

Joiner's Chapel — 

Littleton— W. R. Harvey, J. P. Bowers. 

Loulsburg— Ivy Allen, C. M. Cooke, T. B. Wilder. 

Macon — Hiram A. Nicholson, J. M. Coleman, Henry B.. Daniel. 

Maple Springs — 

Marmaduke— W. D. Gooch, M. T. Duke, Sol. J. Clark. 

Middieburg — J. L. Jackson. 

Midway— J. 0. Bowden, E. D. Brown, C. T. Perry. 

Mountain Grove — W. C. Dorsey, J. R. Moseley, W. H. Pinnell. 

Mt. Hebron— J. S. Shearin, J. A. Bobbitt, Junie Wilder. 

Mt. Hermon — 

Mt. Zion — Cade Parish, Howard Johnson, Willie Burnett. 

NeAV Bethel— W. B. Daniel, A. B. Currin, W. H. Ayscue. 

NeAv Sandy Creek— 0. N. Marshall. 

Noi\l; Henderson — Tom Gutpon, N. B. Baker. 

Peach Tree— A. H. Edwards, J. C. Wheeless, D T. Bunn. 

Philadelphia — W. B. Bunting, J. D. Joyner. 

Poplfu- Springs— C. L. Cheavis, J. B. White, W. A. Mulliii, Jr. 

Quanlde — By letter. 

Red Bud— T. S. Collie, J. H. Wood, J. S. Harper. 

Reedy Creek — B. P. Robertson, J. A. Harris, J. Neal. 

Roanoke Rapids — F. Brown. 



Eock Springs— B. F. WUdev, J. A. Cheavis, M. S. Howel. 

"Rosemary — | 

Saniaria— W. B. Bergeron, T. B. Cone, J. M. Strickland. 

Sandy Creek— J. B. Parish. G. B. West, J. R. Collins. 

Sharon— W. C. Parker. S. J. Dunn. ' . . ; 

Social Plains— T. J. Alford, J. S. Woodruff. . 

South Henderson— B. B. Collins, 0. K Mrashall. 

Sulphur Springs — Harry Limer, J. A. Shepherd, J. R. Aycock 

Turkey Branch— A. G. Willcox. ! ■ 

Yaughns — ■ ' 

Warren Plains — J. R. Pegram and Ed Overby. 

Warrenton— J. W. Allen, J. M, Gardner, T. J. Taylor. 

White Level — D. B. Pearce, Josh Dorsey, Tom Collins. 

The delegates having been enrolled the following committee on order 
of business were appointed, consisting of G. W. May, Ivey Allen, and 
J. C. Bowers. The chair also announced the finance committee as follows: 
T. S. Collins, T. B. Wilder and John Allen. 

Brother Duke, on behalf of the church and community, extended 
to the delegates and visitors a real hearty welcome, and a brief sketch 
of the early history of the church. 

The chair, on behalf of the Association, called upon Brother T. M. 
Pittman to respond which on the part of the Association he did most 
gracefully. 

The chair invited visiting brethren to seats among us, and was 
accepted by Brother E. L. Middleton, of the Sunday School Board. 
Brother B. Craig, representing State Mission Board, and Brother Howard, 
of the Biblical Recorder. New pastors who have recently settled among 
us. were recognized as follows : J. R. Doan, of Henderson, Mae Stamps, 
of Louisburg, Brother Fred Brown, of Roanoke Rapids, Brother Joyner. 
Brother T. M. Arrington welcomed Brethren Ed Shearin and Silas Ward 
as visitors from the Roanoke. Adjourned for dinnei*. Prayer by Brother 
Craig. 

Tuesday— 2 P. M. 

Association reassembled and after praise service, proceeded to 
business. On motion of a committee composed of T. M. Pittman, C. M. 
Cooke and T. J. Taylor, were appointed by the chair to define paragraph 
4 of the report on new Association adopted at last session of this body. 

Committee on order of business made a pai'tial report, which was 
adopted 



Hour for ppocial oicler aviivetl. Brother Ivy Allen read report on 
Peiiodlcals for Brother T. B. Wikler, as folloAvs : 

Report on Periodicals. 

The farmer wlio attempts to farm without the aid of some farm 
papei-, or the doctor -who practices medicine and who does not get a 
medical journal are in the same class Avith the Christian Avho does not 
take his denominational paper — he is doing business on too narrow 
a scale. What is needed in our churches is to be in touch and sympathy 
with the work thioughout the world in general and to be familiar with 
the advanced ideas of the age, not that Ave Avant always to adopt these 
ideas but sometimes in order that Ave may avoid them. By reading the 
denominational paper Ave get not only the good old ideas and doctrines' 
but Jf there is something neAv that is heljDful Ave get that too. Every 
pastor desires that the entire membership of his churches shall read 
the church paper because he knoAvs that they Avill be more responsive 
to the efforts he shall put forth for the uplift of humanity. Ouir 
denominational paper is, of course, The Biblical Recorder, Avhich is 
the organ of the State Convention. Its good intluenee and its circulation 
are constantly groAving. 

So also every Sunday School superintendent among us should try 
to have as large a circulation of Charity and Children among the members 
of liis school as jDossible, because it brings the cause of the oiphans 
close to them and makes it easy to help the orphan cause 

Your com.mittee cordially recommends The Biblical Recorder, Charity 
and Children and The Foreign Mission Journal and Home Field as 
readable, reliable, instructive and helpful and asks that every Baptist 
family shall have some (preferably all) of them as regular visitors to 
their home. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THOS. B. WILDER. 

Which report Avas folloAved by an address on Biblicals by Brother 
I. C. Howard, the Recorder i-epi-esentative, after the report Avas adopted. 

The folloAving report on Sunday Schools was read by Brother May 
for Brother Sledge, the Avriter, and Avas spoken to by Brother J. W, 
Sledge and E. L .Middleton, after Avhich the report Avas adopted. 

Report on Sunday Schools. 

It is hardly necessary to present to the churches of the Tar River 
Association the Scriptural proof for conducting Sunday Schools. Suffice 



it to say that m Xeherniab 8:1-12 we have account of the first Sunday 
School. In the New Testament we have accounts over and over agaui 
<,f Jesus teaching and commanding His followers to teach as well as 
to n:ake Disciples. 

About 1780 Robert Raikes, seemg the conditicu of the poor and 
degraded childien of Er.glar.d, det(ti mined to remedy the condition 
if possible. A little later he found in William Fox a faithful co-workei'. 
These great men of God set going influences which have played :.j small 
[)aii in producing the "Modem Sunday School."' Perhaps no movement 
. f such small beginnings has been moie blessed of God and therefore 
1 cached such gigantic propoitions. No department of our church work, 
SUA e the pleaching of the Gospel, is more woithy of our attention. 

In the Sunday School is one of oui' strongholds for diseipling and 
trail. ing our forces for good. Already we have realized glorious results. 
A larg-e per cent of our church membership is brought into the Kingdom 
through and by the work of the Sunday School. 

At piesent the woik suffers because of a lack of inteiest and 
enthusiasm on the part of church members. Let us awake from ouj' 
lethaigy along this line and be more alive to our duty. Through the 
medium of Sunday School work, we may hope to win many souls for 
the Master. 

We recommend the following: 

1. That we use one of our Union meetings as a Sunday School 
(.'or, •. ention. 

2. That our pastois and superintendents hold rallies to increase 
iuteivst and enlarge our membership. 

3. That each ehuieh give financial support to our State Sunday 
Seliuol uork. 

?. That we appoint a committee to co-opei'ate with our Sunday 
Scliool Secretary in carrying out his plans. 

J. W. SLEDGE, Committee. 

A resolution was adopted instructing the moderator to appoint a 
r-ummittee consisting of one member from each County to co-operate witli 
Brother E. L. Middleton for the purpose of improving our Sunday School 
woik. Brother Ivey Allen was appointed a committee on digest <f 
church letters. 

Committee on new churches appointed, consistinng of G. M. May, 
W. B. Daniel, R. C. Collins. Adjourned. Prayei- by P]rother Taylor. 

Wednesday— 9:30. 

Association met aceoiding to appointment and was led in praise 



10 

service by Brctber May. Visitin.e brethren again invited to seats and 
accepted by Brother M. L. Kesler, General Manager of our Orphanage, and 
Brother C. E- Maclry, representing Home Mission Board. Hour for special 
<id<"- ha\ing ariived. the repoit on oiphanage. In absence of Brother 
Kit^iell, who was to prepare the report, Brother Kesler was called upou 
to address the body in the interets of the orphanage, which he did in a 
\eiy instinctive speech, after Avhich a cash collection was taken, amount- 
ing to $16. After this the hour for Associational and State Missions hav- 
ing arrived, Brotlier T. M. Pittman read the report and the repoi-t was 
spoken to by Brothers Cracy, Pittman, Hufham and Duke, after which the 
roll of churches was called and amounts below pledged for Assoeiaional 
and State Missions for next year. 

Executive Ccmmitlee Report on Associaticnaf Missions. 

We stand on the threshold of a new ej^och in our denominatioinal life. 
It is the natural outcome of other epochs Avhich mark the successive stages 
of the co-operative woik we inheiited from our fathers. 

First of these was the organization of the Kehukee Association 
i^.bout 1769. At that time there were no missionai'y activities such as 
no\\' characteiize our woik. The organization served to bring the 
chn.v-hes into elbow touch, to create a denominational spirit, and to 
unif V and formulate the doctrines of our faith. 

A second was the famous query of Martin Ross to the Kehukee 
Association in 1803: "Is not the Kehukee Association, with all her 
numerous and respectable friends, called on by Providence in some Avay 
to step forward in support of the missionary spirit which the great 
God is so wonderfully reviving amongst the different denominations of 
good men in various parts of the world?'' This led to the beginning 
of missionary activities among our people. It was the initial step towards 
the oiganization of the Baptist State Convention. It resulted in a drawing 
( f the lines between the progressive and reactionary elements in the 
chui-ches and to a rupture of the Association in 1827. 

The third epoch of commanding sienificance was the organization 
of the Tar River Association about 1830. This was composed of the 
missionary churches of the old Kehukee Association, who had grown 
beyond the anti-missionary spirit of the dominant element of that body. 
Thi-^ new Association was a distinctively missionary organization. It 
maintained a bare existence for many years, but finally under the leadership 
and magnificent spirit of brethren now present in this body, those great 
activities were inaugurated which made the Tar River Association one 



11 

cTf tire great religions l)odies «f the world, eliaraeterizcd by the iinest 
missionary si>irit known to modern religious enteriwise. 

A yetir ago this gieat A.ssotnation had grown to a constituency cf 
one iiundred ehui-ehes and 11,006 members. It embraced eleven counties 
and its extremities were more than a hundred miles apart. The extent 
of its territoiy, the magnitude of its operations, and the difficulty ot 
entertainment, all lendered a division necessary. This was ai'rauged 
at Hendeisoii hi Oct<;bei-, 1S07, and the new epocii was ushered i.r. 
Jt iief as an open book upon whose pag'es we aie to Avrite in living 
characters the history of ths future. 

Division and multiplication have marked Baptist progress. Already 
the wisdonr of our last movement is justified. Our .sister churches, fifty 
in number have organized the Roanoke Association, which, at its fii'st 
session provided for missionary operation a sum equal to thai heretofnie 
raised by the old Association, 

This body, with fifty churches and 6,190 members as reported in our 
last minute's is now to enter upon its new life. The work, of the past 
year ha.'i been conducted by the old committee and this committee has 
no report of operations under its direction except preaching maintained 
<lurhig the past few months at Vicksboro by Elder G. W. Coppedge, 
suppoited by contributions of the Franklin, Vance and Warren Unions 
51 1 an expense of .$30. 

Your committee deem it advisable that this Association work in closi^ 
«='o-operation with the State Mission Board, and recommend thai of the 
funds coming up to this Association .$1,000 be appropiiated to the 
Executive Committe for Associational work, under their sole direction 
or ill co-operation with the State Mission Board as they may find most 
desirable. They further recommend that any funds coming to thi>^ 
Association for its next year's operations in excess of $1,000 be turned 
to the State Mission Board in support of the State Mission Avork, with 
the request that such support be given to the work in the bounds of the 
liOiinoke Association as may be practicable. 

There are several fields Avithin the bounds of this Association, which 
lequire cur attention. Three or more in Halifax County, two or moie 
in Warren, one on Warren and Vance line, about two or three in Vance. 
«ine on Warren and Franklin line, and probably two or three in Frankliu 
Comity. 

We recommend that the churches raise during the cominng year $2,000 



12 

fo [:e repoifcfl at the next session of tlie Ais'soeiaficn for the worfc 
cf 1909-1910. 

THOS. M. PITTMAN, CImivman. 

State Missions. 

Two Imndiecl years have passed since the first Baptist chnrehes 
r.ere planted along the Albemarle and Roanoke. As the years went by 
these commanities extended their influence for good by establishing arms 
i>v branches which soon became strong churches. During the fii'st hundred 
yeav7 of our state's history we know very little of any organized plans 
for the spread of the gospel. Isolated churches and individuals were 
accomplishing much for the Lord's cause; but the unsettled conditions in 
the colony at that time Avere not such as to foster any general movement 
for evangelizing the state. 

The year 1800 found about ten thousand Baptists embodied in six 
associations, namely: The Kehukee, Neuse, Flat River, Sandy Creek, 
Yadkin; and Mountain Associations. Their annual meetings were largely 
attoi'ded and were sometimes scenes of great revival. A large part of 
■"he time was occupied in sermons and exhortations. Frequently the 
disf^tissious would wax warm upon purely abstract moral questions 
Avhich seemed speculative rather than aggressive. There was but little 
constructive work or planning for the spread of the gospel. 

The succeeding thirty years brought many changes. Good men and 
women began to conceive the ' idea of co-operation in their efforts to 
reach the unsaved. The Baptist Benevolent Society was the forerunner 
of the Baptist State Convention. A Baptist Magazine Avas published for 
some time at Milton, N. C. In a number of the churches the women 
organized Aid or Mission societies. In 1830 the Baptist State Conveniton 
Avas formed at Greenville and those who Avere imbued Avith anti-mission 
principals Avent out from the churches Avhich they could not control. 
Wake Forest College was established, the Biblcal Recorder entered upon 
its career of usefulness and churches and associations greAV apace. 

Duiing the last half century our people have done much toAvard 
giving the gospel to those Avho live in destitute sections. One of the 
chief purposes of our people assembled in the Baptist State Convention, 
as Avoll as in the various associations, has been to press the' work of 
State missions and see that the gospel is preached in every riook and 
corner of the state from the mountains to the seashore. Under the 
Avise leadership of the state secretaries in turn. Dr. J. D. Hufham, John 
E. Hay, Columbus Durham, John E. White and LiAdngston Johnson, the 
campaign has been moving forward for forty years and the Lord has 



manjffcsted his approval In greatly blessing their labors. The great 
champions of this glorious enterpiise have been God's humble ministers 
who have toiled on incessantly without fee or hope of earthl}^ reward. 

The Old Tar River Association furnishes an example of what can 
be done by organized efTort to fulfil the great commission. The history 
of the association is one of thrilling interest and encouragement. Eternity 
alone can make known a record of the labors and anxieties of those 
inrrepid leaders — the venerable Dr. Hufham, the saintly spirited Geo. M. 
Duke, and a host of their co-laborers, many of whom have gone to their 
reward. Nor can we forget those men of affairs who, like Noah Briggs, 
were i-eady put into the Lord's service their business training for building 
np the waste places. 

Our work is not done. There are still large areas of destitution 
in our midst. From the present vantage ground which the Lord has 
given us, what declaration have we to make now before God as to our 
purposes? Shall we pause? or go forward? 

J. T. ALDERMAN. 

Henderson, N. C, Oct. 27, 1908. 

Antioch $ 10,00 

Bear Swamp 25.00 

Bethlehem 10.00 

Brown's 60.00 

Cary Chapel 20.00 

Castalia 25 00 

Ced;.r Rock 35.00 

Corinth 25.00 

Crocker's Chapel 

Cypress Chapel 30.00 

Enterprise 12.50 

Ephesus 10.00 

Gardners 30.00 

Harris's Chapel 25.00 

Henderson 175.00 

John's Chapel 2.50 

Joyner's Chapel 30.00 

Littleton 65.00 

Louisburg 150.00 

Macon 30,00 

Maple Springs 35.00 

Mariuaduke 10,00 



14 

liiddlehixrg , . . , ...,\ 20.00 

Midway lO.OO 

Moantain G^:ove . . , 

Mt. Hebron , lO.OO 

Mt Hermor 3.00 

Mt. Zion 25.00 

New Bethel 35.00 

New Sandy Creek 10.00 

North Henderson ,.,.....,.,,, ,...,., 20.00 

Peach Tree 25.00 

Philadelphia 25.00 

Poplar Springs 75.00 

Quankie , 10.00 

Red Biul 20.00 

Reeoy Creek • 20. OO 

Roanoke Rapids 

Rock Spring 25.00 

Rutefiflai J 

Samaria 30.00 

Sandy Creek 35.00 

Sharon 35.00 

Social Plains 10.00 

Sonth H?nderson 15.00 

Snlphnr Springs 15.00 

Tui key Branch 10.00 

Vaug'hans 

Wnrren Plains 40.00 

Warrenton . 150.00 

White Level 5.00 

Bethesda 12.00 

B. E, Collins 2.00 

Total , . $1,507.00 

After Avliieh report was adopted. 
Adjourned for dinner. 

Wednescay— 2 P. M. 

Association met promptly and after song service Brother Brown 

led the body in prayer. The clerk read report of Treasurer of the 
Executive Committee, which was adopted. The following committees were 



appumted "by tlie motlerator: For Sunday Schools for Vance County. 
Dr. Castarphen. Henderson ; for Warren County, W. C. Parker. War- 
ii-enton; Franklin County. T. B. Wilder, Louisburg; Halifax County, L. W. 
Bagley, Littleton; Nash County, S. J, Bartlioiomew, Castalia; Standing 
Committee on 2nd page. 

Report 0J1 Home Missions. 

In the United States, with its ever-increasing population, and ever 
pnlarging opportunities, lies the most effective field of operation today 
for the Baptists, a.s it is only in proportion as we gain increased strength 
at home, that we shall be able to gain the means and forge the weapons 
for the greater warfare abroad. 

Our Divine Master's program, the conquest of the world by His 
doctrine and hope and salvation, issued to His disciples when His work 
on earth was completed, and just before He ascended, must ever be the 
program of his people — must ever be the work that calls forth their 
deepest enthusiasm and joy, as it did that of the apostles and first 
Chi'istians. "He must reign until He has put all enemies under His feet." 

Our L<,rd not only set before us the end. but he also prescribed the 
means, and indicated the method. It is under the inspiration and guidance 
of tlie Holy Spirit, and through the agency of His redeemed people that 
llic idohitiies and paganisms are to be overthrown, and His solitary and 
universal empire set up on this earth. And from the fact that He directed 
His disciples to begin at Jerusalem, we infer that the home field is the 
first in order and importance, because it is only as we lengthen the cords, 
strengthen the stakes in our own land, and amongst our own people, that 
we shall be able effectually to give ourselves to the invasion and conquest 
of the foreign lands and alien religions. 

Of tbe progress of the Home Mission work you will find the facts 
recorded in our Convention reports. There you will be able to see, from 
the large number of conversions, and the hundreds of churches built 
every year what a wonderful expansion is taking place. Evidently the 
flowing tide is with us. We have the supreme tnith to declare. ' The 
manifest presence of the Holy Spirit is with us. God give us also the 
grace and courage to enter in with renewed trust in Him, and increased 
enthusiasm until this great work is complete. 

AECHIBALD CREE. 

Report on Home Missions was next thing to claim the attention of the 
body, when Brother A. V. Joyner read the report. After which Brethren 
BroMu and Madry followed in soul stirring addresses. 



'Report on State Missions by Bro. J. T. Alderman was read by Brother 
J. R. Doau and was adopted after discussion by Brother Doan. 

Report en Aged Ministers Relief. 

For eighteen years the Aged Ministers Rehef Board has been faith- 
fully striving to make the funds at its disposal count for the most 
possible in supplying the needs of many of the Elders in Israel who haA'e 
come to the place in life whei e they must sit with palsied hands and 
eyes dim to the thing's of earth and patiently wait for the Master, with 
the welcome plaudit well done, to summon them to their reward; while, 
others build on the foundations they have laid and we enjoy the benefits^ 
of their labors. 

This Board has ever been modest, as are the brethren whose interest^^ 
it has at heart, in its demands. It has no reg-ular agent to press its 
claims, and has never asked for large amounts; yet it is gi'atifying- 
to note that, while it maj' have been slow, there has been a steady 
increase in the amounts contributed for this object each year. At the 
same time there has been a steady increase in the number of applicants 
for aid. 

The last report of the Board shows that for the year 1907 there 
was contributed $3,525.05. One third of the amount contributed each 
year is set aside as a permanent interest bearing fund and the Board 
reported to the last Convention that this fund then amounted to $7,303.46. 
This is in good investments. Thirty-four families Avere being given 
assistance, and there were some others whose applications were being 
considered. The amount contributed last year was the largest ever 
reported, and let us hope that this year it will be still larger. 

But Avhile it is encouraging to report this increase in interest and 
contributions from the state at large; hoAv about the report from the 
Tar River Association? In 1906 forty-nine churches reported contribu- 
tions to this object, amounting to $284.10, while for the year 1907 there 
Avere only twenty-eight churches contributing a total of only $159.02. 
TVhy this going backward? I think this Association Avill do no better 
work at this session than to find the cause for this falling off and 
a remedy for it. 

IVEY ALLEN. 

Report on Aged Ministers Relief fund was read by Brother Ivey Allen 
and after discussion, by Brethren Allen and Hufham was adopted. 

Brother G. W. May offered the following resolution, which was 
adopted : 

Resolved, That the pastors in this Association take a special eollec- 



17 

tion f'ui' State ^fiesions between now and Novem"ber SOtli, witli a vie-.t 
uf laisiiig six hundred dollars. 

The committee on time, place and preacher submitted their report, 
and aftei' amendments was adopted, as follows: To meet with the elnueh 
at Sharon, Tviesday after the first Sunday in October, 1909, Brother J. R. 
Doan to preach the introductory sermon, with Brother M. C. Stami^s 
a s alternate. 

Brother Pitman's Resolution. 

Your committee to report on the effect of Section i of the Resolution 
dividing the Association, respectfully report : 

That it was the intention and true eontruction of that section that it 
relates only to funds sent to the Association for the work of 1907-'08. 
tfhat any funds remaining on hand for that work, should be turned over 
to the Roanoke Association. That all funds sent to this Association for 
the work of 1908-'09. is the exclusive property of this Association and 
shall be retained by the Treasurei' for application aeeording to the order 
of this Association. 

THOMAS M. PITTMAN, 
T. J. TAYLOR, 

For Committee. 

Report by special committee was made by Brother T. M, Pitman and 
Brother T. J. Taylor, whicli was adopted. 

Brother J. R. Doan was elected as a delegate to the Southern Baptist 
<^on mention, and authorized in the event he eoidd not go to appoiiit 
his alternate. 

Brethren T. M. Pittman. J. D. Hnfham and G. M. Duke were elected 
as delegates to the Baptist State ConA-ention. 

Xew church at Bethesda was received and moderator exte)uied right 
hand of fellowship to delegates. 

Adjoni-ned by Bi'other Hufham. 

Thursday— 9:30 A. M. 

Association met, and led in prayer by Brother Taylor. On morica 
it was ordered that all reports that had not been jead be sent to th*' 
clerk for publication in minutes. 

Report en Foreign Missions. 

First — A brief review of our woik. 

Never in the history of the world has God's Kingdom made such 
advance as in the past few years. In 189.*> there was given for Po)-eign 



IS 

Missions, $13,000,000 and in 1905 there was given $21,000,000. TTiere 
Aveie added 63,000 converts and in 1906 were added 145,115 converts. 
Then theie were 995,000 Protestant ehnrches in Foreign Mission fields. 
In 1906 tliere were 1,843,000 ehnrches. Note:-— The increase in additions 
in membership in native adherents have far out run the increase in 
('ontribntions. 

Southern Baptists, instead of cIoubKng- onr membership in Foreign 
lands — the general rate of increase have nearly quadrupled their yearly 
nnmber of baptisms and trebled their church membership. And yet the 
contributions have been less than one half cent a week. 

There are nearly six million Baptists in the world and nearly two 
million in the Southern Baptist Convention. In 1907-1908 there were 
added to us by baptism 124,000 members and we gave more than 
$7,000,000 for all religions purposes. For every dollar given to State, 
Home and Foreign Missions, six were kept for the home church. And 
yet in Foreign lands there is only one ordained missionary to 180,000 
people, while in the United States one to every 546 people. Manj' of our 
leading churches are planning to give away as much each year as they 
keep .'A home. 

Now as to the principle of Foreign Missions: — 

The true spirit of Foreign Missions is as vital to us, a Christian 
people, as the education of our sons and daughters, as strong in its appeal 
to sentiment as, and more positive in its call to obedience than the 
caring /for the orphans and the infirm, and as clearly a part of our 
life as State Missions. 

World evangelization is tlie thought for which our Lord came, to 
which Paul was called and Peter converted. 

Personal salvation must mean personal service in saving. Fellowship 
with the Lord is fellow helping with His Avill. To realize His mission as 
to self is to acknoAvledge His commission as to others. 

World evangelization is not taught in the New Testament as a church 
ordinance, but is as plainly taught and enjoined upon us as Baptism and 
the celebration of the Lord's Supper. The thought is fundamental. 
Obedience as to water is incomplete without obedience as to the world. 
Obedience is demanded to enter the church. Should not obedience be 
required to remain in the church? 

He who looks afar sees clearly close at hand, and the life whose love 
is large enough to reach across the waters has a warm place for the 
interests nearer by. 

In discharging our responsibilities towards this supreme duty we 



19 

need betlcr system hi ^vl^cll the mere gathenng o£ monies shall be 
subordinated to arousing interest, stressing right relations, and seeking 
eousciences void of offense. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. P. BOWERS. 

Report on Ministerial Education. 

Edueation is the training and leading out to their most efficient uses 
the faculties of the human being. 

Taking this as our idea we see much to discourage as we look at 
the stupendeous task that confronts us, but, looking back through the 
ag-es of the past we see much to encourage, for great advancements has 
been made and the problems which seemed insurmountable has already 
been accomplished. We thei-efore face the problems of the future with 
assurance of some degree of success. We have foundations laid and 
^vork done which, i-eveals oui- needs and shows us our tools ready f < i- 
use. We also have some knowledge of how to use them. It is with 
gratification that we note the rising tide of public opinion along educational 
lines, and yet we realize there must be a broader and more acute 
awnkeniuy: of the public conscience before we attain the 2enith of our 
hopes. We have no school in our borders which we call our own, aiid 
yet, there ai-e a number of schools doing efficient work. 

Castalia, Preparatory School and Busmess Institute is the only 
private school m our midst. It is not as large as some of our leadin::: 
preparatory schools, but is doing as efficient work. It is growing in 
iiumbei"S and i-eputatiou year by year. In it the young minister receives 
tuition free. 

Buie's Oeek Academy, which is near by, is our leading preparatory 
scliool and is doing the greatest work of its life. 

Winterville High School is also one of our best schools for 
preparatory work. 

The C B. F. Institute, hi its sixty-one yeai-s of active work, has held 
•out a helping hand to the girls of all our eastern counties. Her years 
lie jiot heavy upon her, but give added luster and strength, vrhieh enables 
her with pride to point to the future with hope that she may be able 
to hold a brighter torch to future generations. 

Just beyond our western borders stands Oxford Female Seminary. 
She has made for hei-self in the days which lie behind her a i-eputation 
for which we honor her and bid her go forward. 

The Tcnng'est of onr daughters, the Baptist University foT wouxen, 



20 

)ia.s oivtsfvippetl tliem all in her growth and has crowned herself with 
a laurel Avreath of victory, for the womanhood of our state before her 
fcuixlers dreamed that she had girded herself for the battle. We bid 
hei' God speed and ask that she hold high the beacon light of noble ideals 
to future generations. 

And Jiow we come to Wake Forest College, the "meeca" of North 
Carolina Baptists. For this institution North Carohna Baptists has laid 
larger plans, worked and prayed more than for any other. The reason 
for this is their reverence for religion and their high ideals for efficiency 
in the ministry. Wake Forest is doing the greatest work in its history 
at the present and we look to the fntnre with confidence that her greatest 
achievements are yet to be attained. God bless her and may she never 
for.fot that her mission is to train men to be strong and courageous in 
the spiritual realm. 

Last, but not least, is our Baptist Theological Seminary in Lonis- 
\iile. Kentucky. 

This is our school of the prophets, and every year we have a lai'ge 
class of well trained scholars coming from its halls to bless humanity and 
honor God. We must look after its interest or we shall fail at the pinnacle 
of our etfort. 

With all the effort we put forth through our churches and schools 
to (rain men and women for religious work, the cry is still more men 
and women in onr own state; and, when we look beyond our borders we 
liear a great cry "come over and help us or Ave die." We are unable 
to adequately supply the demand so we must needs go to our Lord and 
plead for laborers that the harvest may be garnered. 

Your committee would be unfaithful to the trust imposed if he should 
fail to emphasize the deficiency in numbers of young men and women 
who are willing to consecrate themselves to the work of the Lord. 

We earnestly ask that in December the pastors preach on the subject 
of "Consecrating Life to God." 

G. W. MAY, Committee. 

Tar River Association 

In account with A. G. Wilcox, Treasurer, October 1907. 

To balance due Association at last session $ 3.99 

Heceived from Finance committe for State Missions 54.57 

Received from Finance Committee for Home Missions 33.19 

Received from Finance Committee for Foreign Missions 23.49 

Received from Finance Committee for Education 15.60 



21 

Rereived from Finanee Committee for Orphanage 46.15 

Recei^ed from Finance Committee for Aged Ministers 1G.20 

Received from Finanee Com. for Colportage and S. S. Missions . . . 4.50 

Received from Finance Com. for Miss. Aberneth^ , , . 2.0*^ 

Received from Finanee Com. for Minutes 94.50 

Cash, Aurora chureh 77.25 

Cash. Rev. R. L. Davis 30.00 

Cash, Orphanage pledges 22.00 

Cash, Orphanage pledges 23.01 

J. A. Musiian, Associational IMissions , 2.50 

\Y. M. S. Fishing Creek 6.00 

Rock Springs for Associational Missions 15.00 

Rock. Spring for State Missions 6.00 

Rock Spring for Home Missions 1.25 

Rod: Spring for Minutes 1.50 

$478.70 

To excess 10.00 

$488.70 

By credits , 488 70 

To balance due Treasurer $ .21 

Disbursements. 

By arat. paid Walters Durham for State Missions $ 54.57 

By amt. paid Walters Durham for Home Missions 33.19 

By amt. paid Walters Durham for Foreign Missions 23.49 

By amt. paid Walters Durham for Education 15.60 

By amt. paid Waltei's Durham for Orphanage 46.65 

By amt. paid Walters Durham for Aged Ministers 16.20 

By amt. paid Walters Durham for Colportage and S. S. Missions . . 4.50 

By amt. paid Walters Durham for Miss. Abernethy 2.00 

By amt. paid Brother Ragland for Aurora Church . 77.25 

By amt. paid R. L. Davis 30.00 

By amt. paid M. L. Kesler on Orphanage pledges 22.00 

By amt. paid M. L. Keslter, Hat collection for Orphanage 23.11 

By amt. paid N. Biggs for J. A. Mustian, Asso, M 2.50 

By amt. paid X. Biggs, W. M. S., Fishing Creek, Ass. M 6.00 

By amt. paid N. Biggs for sending telegram .60 

By amt. paid N. Biggs, Asso. Miss., Rock Springs 15.00 



By amf. paid Walters Durliam, State Mis., Rock Sping- , , , G.OQ 

By amt. paid Walters Durham. Home Mis. Rock Spring 1,25 

By amt. paid E. E. Hilliard, printing Minutes , 70.0CH 

By amt. paid E. E. Hilliard for blank Church letters , l.OO 

Clerk's fee 25.00 

Stationery, stamps, etc. . , ,,.,,.,,. .^, , . , 3.0C9 

$478.91 

By excess paid N. Biggg; . , , ,,.,,..,.. , . , , , 10. OO 



, _ $488.91 

iif Respectfully suBmitted, 

A, G. WILCOX, Treasurer, 
Examined and fotiiicl to be correct, 

T, M. ARRINGTON, 
f Oct. 28, 1908, j 

Tar River Asscclatfonr 

In account with Noah Biggs, Treasare? 
1908 

To Rev. E. B. Walts .,,.,,,,,,,, ,..,.,$ 100,00 

To Rev. G. P. Harrell ..,.,,.., 456.60> 

To Rev. T. J. Crisp , 37.50 

To Rev. D. E. Vipperman 146.00 

To Rev. J. M. Bennett 195.81 

To Rev. G. J. Dowell ...,..,..,,, , , . 100,00 

To Rev. J. K Henderson , 62.50 

To Rev. Ben E. Dunn ,..,..,.....,, 57.07 

» o Rev. W. H. Davis , ,,..,, 50.00 '., 

To Rev. M. A. Walton , , 50.00 

To Rev. A. V. Joyner , 250.00 

Ta Rev. O. N. Marshall 200.00 

To Rev. D. T. Dunn ,..,.., 25.00 

To Rev. T. J. Raglann ... ... 100.00 

To Rev. A. G. Wilcox 143.75 

Ta Rev. E. C. Andrews 216.6(5 

Ta Rev. A. T. Caudle 340.00 

To Rev. J. E. Hudson ., 37.50 

,\ .i ^ : ^^.;;--..,.k ... $2,563.39 



23 

r' " " Credits. "" ' ^ 

• By nmoxil; from Association ^,518.91 

By amount from Rev, A. G. Wiicox 25.00 

$2,543.91 

To balance due Treasiu-er , $ 19,48 

Examined and found correct, 

A. J. AUSTIN, Committee, 

The Treasurer of Association offered his report as follows, which 
was adopted. Brother Duke stated that the manuscript for History of 
Tar River Association was ready for printer, and on motion of Brother 
Doan, a coroinittee was appointed to examine and arrang-e with the 
churches for puhlieation. Brother Doan was added to said committee. 

On motion of Brother T. J. Taylor, which motion prevailed, that 
the churches of this Association arrang-e to vsupport two -missionaries on 
the Foz'eign field next year. 

Report of Finance Committee. 

Your committee beg to report that we have received the following 
sums : 

For Associational Missions . . , $ 968.64 

For State Missions 3.00 

For Home Missions 6.50 

For Foreign Missions 5.50 

For Orphanage 20.19 

For Aged Ministers 11,44 

For Minutes fund 54.84 

Total $1,070.11 

Respectfully submitted, 
THOS. B. WILDER, for Committee. 

It was moved that Brother Duke correspond with certain churches 
and pastors with a view of raising the $30 additional for printing and 
distributing minutes. The clerk was ordered to print and distribute 1,500 
copies of the minutes and receive the usual compensation for his services. 

The following resolution by Brother Doan passed unauimouslj^ (rising- 
vote) : 

Resolved, That the thanks of the Tar River Association be and are 
hereby extended to the Sandy Creek Baptist Church and her beloved 



24 

pastor for fheir generous entertainment. 2. That tlie same be exteiuTecl 
to Bro. T. M. Arrington for presiding over this meeting of the Association. 
''God be with you till we meet again," was sung by choir, and Brother* 
Hufham followed in an earnest prayer for God's blessings upon the 
Avork and workers, the parting hand was taken and the moderator declarerl 
the Association adjourned to meet with the Church at Sharon, Warren 
County, on Tuesday after the first Sunday in October, 1909, at 11 o'clock- 

G. M. DUKE, Moderator, 

Maple ville, N, C. 
A. G. WILCOX, Clerk and Treasurer, 

Brinkleyville, N. C. 
Note : — The clerk, on his return from Association, took his bed and 
was confined to bed and room for twelve days, and not able to sit up only 
a little while at a time and hence delay in getting off mannseript. 



Tar River Association— Times and Places of Meetings. 

1. Sandy Creek, Franklin county, commencing on fourth Smiday in 
October. 1831. 

2. Maple Springs, J'ranklin county, commencing on Thursday before 
fourth Sunday in October, 1832. 

3. Hickory Chapel, Nash county, Thursday before fourth Sunday 
in October, 1833. 

4. Brown's, Warren county, Saturday before fourth Sunday in 
October, 1834. 

5. Red Bud, Franklin county, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
October, 1835. 

6. Shiloh, Franklin county, 23-25th of October, 1836. 

7. Peach Tree, Nash county, Saturday before fourth Sunday in 
October, 1837. 

8. Reedy Creek, Warren County, Friday before fouth Sunday in 
October, 1838. 

9. Flat Rock, Franklin county, Saturday before fourth Sunday in 
October, 1839. 

10. Bear Swamp, Halifax county, Saturday before fourth Sunday 
in October, 1840. 

11. Louisburg, Saturday before first Sunday in October, 1841. 

12. Gardner's, Warren county, October, 1842. 

13. Poplar Spring, Franklin county, Friday before first Sunday in 
October, 1843. 



14. lii'dwn's. "WiiMcii couiily. S;iliiril;iy before fii'st Suii(l;iy in 

Oftobei- 184-4. 

1"). ]\lii])l(' Sjiriiiu-, Fi;uil<rni cnuiily. Siiluiiliiy Ijcfni-c lir>t Suinlny i;i 

OctolHT. 184."). 

]C. Siuidy ("leek. Frniikliii comity, 24tli October, 184n. 

17. I-Jioii. Wnrren county, Fiiiliiy l)efoi-c tir>t Sunday in Octol^er. 1847 

18. Hickory, Xasli counly. Ki'iday l)et'o)'e first Sunday in October. 
1848. 

19. Haywood's (now Corintb), FrankHn county, Fricbiy bet ore fir~t 
Sunday in Octo))ei', 184!). 

'20. Hed I)ud, FrankHn ciunity. Fri<biy aftei first Sunday in Octo- 
ber. 18.")0. 

21. AVairenlon. Fii<biy Ijefmc fiist Suiulay in Octol)er. ls.")l. 

'2'2. Fbit K(i(d<. Fraid<Hn c(ainty. Fii(biy befoi'c fii'st Sunibiy in 
October, 187)2. 

'2'.\. J'each Tree. Xasb county, Friday beforvi foui'lb Sunday in 
.\u-ust. 187)^. 

24. Keedy ('reek. Wai'ren county, Fii(biy l)ei'oi'e fourtli Sundav in 
Au.tiust, 187.4. 

27). IVri'y's (4ia])ek Franl-;lin county, Friday l)efore fourib Sumk-iy 
ill AuLnist. 187).', 

2(j. Salem, AVif^on (-(junty. Friday before fourfli Sunday in Au,l;u-t. 
1 87)(i. 

27. Gaidnei's, W;iiren connl>', Friday befoie fourlli Sumlay ii 
Au-ust, 187)7. 

28. Po])bir Sjiriim', P'rankHii coiiity, Fiiday aftei' lliird Sunday in 
Au-ust. 187)8. 

29. Sbaron, Warren county, Friday l)efore fouith Sunday in Aimust, 
1 839. 

30. ri-anklinton. Friday Ixd'ore fourtli Sunday in Auiiust, 18()0. 

;il. Maple S])!iiii;-. Fianklin comity, Friday Ixd'ore fourtb Sunday 
in Au.misr, 18()1. 

.'52. lirowiTs. Warreii county. Fiiday before f<uirtii Sunday in AuLi'u-t. 
18()2 

'.>'.]. Ked Ibnl, Franklin c(nni1y, Friday l)efore fourtli Sundav isi 
Au-ust, 18f).'?. 

'14. i\ri. Zion. Franklin county. 

T). I[i(d<(iry ('b;i)iel. Xasb county, Frid;iy befoic fourtb Smnlay in 
Seiiteiiiber. 18(17). 



,"!l). Bear S\v;iru{». Xjisli (-ouiity, Fiidiiy nt'tei- first Suii<I;iy in October. 
I8(i(i. 

?)7. r'vpress C'liape]. Franklin <-"innly. Friday lielore tirst Snnday in 

October. 1.8(i7. 

38. Ue.l Oak. Xasb connty. Friday before tirst Snnday in Oetobei'. 
T8(iS. 

31). Shai'on. Wairen eoniity. Fiiday after fonith Siuuhiy in Oetobei'. 

ison. 

40. Po))]ar Si)riiiii-. FiankHn county, 'i'hursday before first Sunday 
in October. 1870. 

41. TTaywood's (now Corintb), Franklin county. Thnisday before 
first Sunday in October. 1871. 

4-!. Sandy Creek. Franklin county. Tbursday before first Sunday i'l 
Octobei'. 1872. 

43. Wil,-on. Friday befoie first Sunday in October. 1873. 

4 4. Fhilndelpbia. Nash county. October 1-3. 1874. 

4."). IJeedy Creek. Warren county, Thursday before fii'st Sunday in 
October. 187.'). 

40. TTenderson. September 28-30, 1871). 

47. Pleasant Gi-ove. Nash county. October 4-(), 1877. 

48. r<nioconai-a, Halifax county, Octobei- 10-12. 1878. 
40. Louisbur-. October 9-12. 1879. 

")0. Peach Tree. Xash county, October 0-8. 1880. 

')1. Anti.K'h. Halifax county. 1881. 

.")2. Littleton. October .')-7. 1882. ' 

■").■!. Kock Spriiiii', P'ranklin county, October 11-13. 1883. 

.')4. Alount Ziou. Fi-anklin county. Oct(d)er 9-11. 1884. 

.'.'. WiUon. October 8-10. 188-'), 

.")(). BroAvn's. Wan-en county, October 7-9, 1880. 

.">7. Sjmiaria, Xash county, October 4-0, 1887. 

■)8. -Maple Spiino', Franklin county, October 11-13, 1888. 

."9. r|;irdner's. Waiien county. October 10-12. 1889. 

()0. Greenville. October 9-11, 1890. 

(H. Warrenton. October 8-10, 1891. 

()2. Lonisbnr-. October :)-7. 1892. 

03. Philadelphia, Oct(djer r)-7. 1893. 

04. Scotland Xeck. October 11-13, 1894. 

0.'). Wilson, October 9-11. 1895. ■ 

00. Po])lar Sprin.u', October 7-9. 1890. 

07. Sfonev Creek. October 5-7, 1897. . ' '. ■ \ 



08. W('l<l(Mi. (^crobci- 4-1). 1S98. 

<in. Wiirren I'liiiiis. Ocldbcr i!-'.'). ISHi). 

70. Sprin.-i' Ihipc. ()ct(.l)^'r Ki-lh'. lilOl). 

71. (•.ninth, (H-t.il»er S-K). i;i01. 

72. Wn.-hiiiuldii. Oci,,l,(.,- (i-8. HH)2. 
7.'!. h'ocky Mduiit. O.-tdx-r ()-8. l!)(l".. 
7-1. Mn]-.1(' S])rinu-s. Octdhcr 4-(i. l!l(14. 
7."). 'r;iil)(ii(.. ()cl,.l)(M' ;!-.'). li)0."). 

7(;. Red Oak. Oct(:))er !)-ll. l!)()fi. 

77. Ilpudpison. Oct.ibor 7-9. 1007. 

78. Saii.lv Creek. ()ct(,l)ei' 27-28-29. 1908. 



Rules of Decorum. 



Belicxinii- it best to be ^nveriied by ceilaiii rules and i-eiiulat imi- i'l 
r-niidiu'tiiip the business ui' this Assuciat ion. we adej)! the I'dHowiiii;- : 

1. The Assdcialidii shall be dpeued and ehised with piayev. 

X'dt more than one pei'sdu shall speak af a time, who shall I'ise 
from his seal and address the ?»loderator. 

3. Tiie person thns speaking' shall not lie intei-rnpted, unless he 
violates some rule of decornni. 

4. The person s|)eakiug shall adhere stiictly to the subject, am! in 
nowise I'eflect on any otlier brother. 

.'). Xo lirother sliall absent hiinself from tlie Association without 
obtaining peririission from the body. 

0. Xo brother ^hall s])eak moie llian twice on tlie same sn.bject 
without unanimous consent. 

7. Xo i^ersan shall whi>pei- while a brother is >]iea4<inL;. 

5. The lunues of the delegates shall l.)e eni-olled by the Clerk, i'.ud 
called as often as the Association recpiires. 

9. Tln^ Moderat.u' ma\' gi\(' his ideas on any sid)ject ln^'ore piitling 
it to the \dle. but is entitled to \-(i1e oidy in ca>e .d' a \\t\ 

10. An older of business shall be made at the beginning of eadi 
sessioir. iind shall be (dninged only by \<ile of the body. 

Constitution. 

1. The Associati(^n shall l)e c(Uuposed of the pastors .and of ihc 
UKMubei-s chosen by the idiurcdics. who sliall produce lettei's ceitifyiuL; their 
a]ipointm"nt. Meml)ers thus chosen and con\-ened. together with the 
nast<us. -hall be dein)iMiim t(^d The Ta i' U'ivei' Ihauti-I As-ocia tion, wh'idi 



2s 



.-.li.-il! !i;i\(' 11(1 jKiwcr over 11h' cliurclies. nor shall it infriiiiic on .-my of 
ilieir vitrlits. 

2. Tiic letters frojii llie <'Iiurelies shall (MHilaiii the iimnher then in 
feihiwship and those Ijajitized, receixed l)y letter, dismissed, ex<duded and 
died since last Association. 

:>. The officei's of the Association shall he a .Mo<lprator. Clerk. 
Treasnier and Tlistoiiaii. who shall be (dioseii hy the suit'rag-es of the 
ti'.enibers ]iresent. 

4. Other (diur(dies, ii])on petition by letter and by dele.i;ates. and 
after a satisfactory examination of their Ai'ticles of Faith, may be 
admitted to the body by a nnanimous vole, when the Modei'ator shall give 
to their d«deii'ates the riiiht hand of fellowship. 

.1. Evei-y church in this Association is entitled to one representative. 
)»iit no church more than three. 

{). Every motion made and seconded shall be left to the discretion 
of the A'^;sociation Avhelher it shall be debated or not. 

7. The Association shall endeavor to furnish the churches with 
copies of its Minutes. 

8. The Minutes of the Association shall be read and approved, and 
>hall be siaued by the ^Moderator and Clerk befoi'e the Association 
adjiuu'us. 

'.). Any chur(di not representinti' itself in this body for three succes- 
sive sessions, by letter or delegates, shall be stricken from the roll of 
the (diurches, unless satisfactory ]-easons are assigned. 

10. The Association slmll withdraw fellowship from any church 
v.hiidi shall be found disonlei'ly in faith or practice. 

n. Visiting brethren from sister churches, or similar bodies, may 
be invited to participate in our deliberations. 

12. At each session of the Association delegates to the Baptist State 
Comention and to the Southern Baptist Convention shall be chosen by vote. 

13. This Constitution is subject to alteration by a majority vote 
of the delegates enrolled at any session. 

14. The business of the Association shall l)e conducted according 
111 ]\l(drs Parliamentary Practice. 



2i) 



Statistical Report ot Woman's Woik 1908. 

TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 



Societies of The C hurche.s. 



Biowis 

Caiv'n Chapel 4 

Gajdneis j U 

Hendeisori ' 20 

Henderson Y. P. S | 7 

Hendeisf.n Sunbeam^- | 

Littleton | 13 

Littleton Sunbeams i K 

L.uisbum ! 20 25 

1 .ouisbuig Sunbeams j 2 77 

Maeon 3 00 

Midd'ebuig: Sunbeams SO 

Peath Tree I 3 85 

Roanoixe Rapids j cO fO 

Sharon I 19 50 

Warienton 26 30 

Warrenton Sunbeams 10 53 

Warren Plains | !■ 00, 

Total 221 91130 27'127 74 




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Digest of Church Letters. 



JiV i;i{(>. Al.LRN. 



CHURCHES. 



MEMBERSHIP. 



CONTRIBUTIONS. 



Antioch. 

Bear Swamp 

Bethlehem 

Browns 

Careys 

Castalia 

Cedar Rock 

(^orinth 

Enterprise 

Ephesus 

Gardners 

Harris Chapel 

Henderson 

John's Chapel 

Littleton 

Louisburg 

Macon 

Maple Springs 

Marmaduke 

Middlebuig 

Midway 

Mountain Grove 

Mount Herman 

Mount Hebron 

Mount Zion 

New Bethe)..;.. 

New Sandy Creek.. 
North Henderson.. 

Peach Tree 

Philadelphia 

Poplar Springs 

Quankie 

Red Bud 

Reedy Creek 

Roanoke Rapids... 

Kock Springs 

Samaria 

t^anay Creek 

Sharon 

See al Plains 

bouth Henderson., 
ir ulphur Spring.".... 

Tiiikey Branch 

Warren Plains 

Warrenton 

White Level 



53 

17tf 

84 

124' 

76 i 

81 ' 

192! 

1751 

112 

122 i 

188 

131 

160 

48 

152 

176 

96 

212 

61 

79 

90 

91 

15 

177 

1«5 

170 

42 

173 

206 

190 

3£1 

59 

197, 

176 

128. 

]4li 

271 

312 

150 

82 

115 

90 

31 

160 

198 

60 



08 


LOSS 1 


GAIN 


62 


1 


9 


172 


4 




88 


. 1 


4 


118 


6 


8? 




6' 
31 


^^?, 




168 


24 


178 


1 


3 


135 




23 

14 




136 


1 


185 


3' 


13<1 




34 


191 




48 




144 


8 




?m 




43 
22 


118 




165 


47' 


h?, 


1 

4 
4 
4 


83 




'(4 




95 




m 




7 
10 


1R7 




161 


4 


171 




1 

45 


87 




120 


53 




•>\1 




11 


186 


4 


888 


3 




65 




6 


',>07 




10 


174 


- 




134 


6 


158 




17 


287 




16 


311 


1 




147 





3 


106 




24 


132 




17 


86 


4, 




33 




2 


162 




2 


201 




3 


80 




20 



1908 



LOSS GAIN 



87 60, 

18 39 

90 75 

339 90 

250 91 

150 15 

884 40 

302 23 

217 05 

108 75 

396 13 

148 52 

2070 14 

53 65 

1288 65 

557 57 

270 55 

253 50 

124 11 

341 58 

674 80 

72 60 



1 50 

138 19 
479 66] 

65 351 
304 89 

19 85; 
142 23 
383 44 

70 26 
2(;0 75 
163 33 
70147 



848 98 

:'88 58 

1379 44 

79 71 

309 31 

185 93 

76 04 

895 68 

1S76 46 

8 25 



24 65 

7 17 

49 82 



21 99 

47 49 



36 00 

S06 6O 

7 47 



112 25 
25 56 

140 57 
317 91 
203 42 
186 15 
691 00 
309 70 
152 72 
124 52 
537 30 
177 06 
2441 20 

48 17 
2037 46 
4430 S7 
295 04 
202 60 
530 18 
373 63 
105 72, 

60 75 
123 56 

80 00 
165 87 
360 82, 

38 50 
212 70 
147 08 
188 00 
348 84; 

82 10 
121 97 
147 62 
680 74 
216 92 
25166 
241 27 
175 65i j 4796 21 



64 33 






15 77 




141 17 




28 54 




371 06 


5 50 






748 81 




3883 31 




24 49 


50 90 






406 07 




32 05 


569 08 




11 85 






123 56 


84 50 






27 78 


118 78 




26 85 




92 19 






127 23 




45 77 


34 60 






1184 



138 78' 
15 71 
20 73 



97 32 



72 501 
146 65j 
149 61 

72 25! 
38164; 
1666 00! 
413 60!. 



7 21 

162 66! 

36 32 

379I 

14 04, 

210 461 



405 33 



Total ' 6378 6 614 163; 355 15894 23 24989 43 1790 08 10891 34 



B"-^: 



ANNUAL 

OF THE 

XAR RIVEIR 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

1909 

IN ITS 79TH, SESSION 

Held With the Church at Sharon, Warren Coumv, 

OCtoDer 5-7th, I909. 



The next Session to be held with church at 
New Bethel, Vance Co. , on Tuesday after 
first Sunday in October, 1910, at 11 o'clock. 
To preach Introductory Sermon, Rev. Mc. 
Stamps, Alternate A. V. Joyner. 



OFFICERS: 



Rev. G. M. DUKE, Moderator, - - Mapleville, N. C. 
Rev. a. G. WILLCOX, Clerk and Treas. Brinkley ville, N. C. 



ANNUAL 

OF THE 

"TAR RIVEIR 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, 

1909 

IN ITS 79th, session 

Held with the Church at Sharon, Warren Coiintv, 

OCtoDer 5-7th, 1909. 



The next Session to be held with church at 
New Bethel, Vance Co., on Tuesday after 
first Sunday in October, 1910, at 11 o'clock. 
To preach Introductory Sermon, Rev. Mc. 
Stamps, Alternate A. V. Joyner. 



OFFIOERS: 



Rev. G. M. DUKE, Moderator, - - Mapleville, N. C. 
Rev. a. G. WILLCOX, Clerk and Treas. Brinkleyville, N. C. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 



T. J. TAYLOR, T. M. PITTMAN, J. M. GARDNER, 

G. W. MAY, IVEY ALLEN, A. W. PERRY, 

W. B. DANIEL, J. A. KELLEY, G. M. DUKE. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

To Write on Aged Ministers Jordan Barrow. 

To Write on Orphanage Ivey Allen. 

To Write on Education __• L. W. Bagley. 

To Write on Temperance G. W. May. 

To Write on Woman's Work J. R. £)oan. 

To Write on Periodicals T. M. Pittman, 

To V/rite on Sunday Schools A. H. Hoyle. 

OUR FIELD MEMBERS EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

■State Missions Geo. Stunstall. 

Home Missions G. G. O'Neal. 

Foreign Missions : T. J. Taylor. 

MINISTER'S AND POST OFFICE. 

Bobbitt, W. M. Littleton 

Bowers, J. P. ■_ Littleton 

Bunn, D, T Spring Hope 

Creech, Worlie 1 Kenly 

Cullom, W. R. Wake Forest 

Coppedge, G. W Henderson, No. 2 

Duke, G. M Mapleville 

Doan, J. R Henderson 

Huf ham, J. D Henderson 

Hocutt, J. E Nashville 

Joyner, A. V. Wise 

May, G. W. Castalia 

O'Neal, G. G Roanoke Rapids 

Poe, E. D Wake Forest 

Sledge, J. W Stallings 

Stradley, J. A. Oxford 

Seymore, l Wake Forest 

Swope, L. W Louisburg 

Taylor, T. J L- Warrenton 

Tunstall, Geo i__ Wake Forest 

Willcox, A. G Brinkleyville 



Sharon, Warren Co., N. C, Oct. 5th, 1909. 
The seventy-ninth annual session of the Tar River Association 
met with the church here to-day. Bro. Hufham read the script- 
ures and A. G. Willcox lead the Association in prayer and Bro. J. 
R. Doan, of Henderson, preached the Introductory Sermon. 
Text, John 20th chapter and 21st verse. Bro. Livingston 
Johnson, Cor, Sec. Bap. State Convention was present, and by 
reason of the fact, was forced to leave to catch a train. Came 
before the Association immediately after sermon, and in his own 
happy forcible way told of the State Mission work, and the needs 
for carrying on same. After announcement by Pastor the As- 
sociation adjourned for dinner. 

TUESDAY-2 P. M. 

Association re-assembled and was lead in prayer by Bro Sledge. 
The Committee on order of business was announced as follows: — 
T. J. Taylor, J. R. Doan and Paul Bowers. Finance Committee 
appointed W. E. Bowers, S. R. Duke and W. C. Parker Sr. Roll 
of churches called and names of delegates enrolled as follows: 
Antioch _L. R. Hamill, Joe Smith. 

Bear Swamp W. E. Bowers. Watson Bowers. Ivy Crawley. 
Bethesda__H. T. Norwood. J. H. Satterwhite, E. A. Watkins. 
Bethlehem _.W. D. Harrison, Jesse Carter, J. E. Pepper. 
Brown's_ .Walter Smith wick, Dan Revis, Sam Allen. 
Cary Chapel A. H. Hoyle. 
Castaha WiUie May, G. W. May. 

Cedar Rock T. H. Sledge, Ferrall Parish, W. H. Parish. 
Crocker's Chapel 

Corinth _ J. M. Conn. , • 

Cypress Chapel . ^ 

Enterprise Fletcher Bobbitt, R. D. King, Hardy Bobbitt. 
Ephesus_.G. W. Coppedge. 

Gardners„^W. P. Rodwell, H. E. Rodwell, J. W. Shearin. 
Harriss ChapeL.Jack Crawley, Jim EUington. 
Henderson T. P. Stewart, W. L. Martin. 
Johns Chapel 

Joyner's ChapeL B. F. Pearce. 

Littleton .E. C. Bobbitt, Pv. R. Rodwell, W. R. Harvey. 
Louisbury_.Ivey Allen. 

Macon _. J. M. Coleman, T. M. Allan, H. A. Nicholson. 
Maple Springs _W. M. Boon, W. H. Perry, Jr. 
Marmaduke. M. C. Duke, S. R. Duke, W. C. Haithcock. ' 



Middleburg__W. H. Kimball, S. G. Champion, Thos. Wiggins. 

Midway- _ J. 0. Bowden, Glen Townsend. 

Mountain Grove. _W. D. Dorsey. 

Mt. Harman__J. B. Williams, R. Joyner. 

Mt. Hebron __ 

Mt. Zion__J. T. Neal, Cad Parrish, G. D. Joyner. 

New BetheL_W. B. Daniel, G. T. Ayscue, W. C. Duke. 

New Sandy Creek. _T. S. West. 

North Henderson __ J. D. Gupton. 

Peach Tree.-W. H. Delbridge, J. C. Wheeless. 

Philadelphia. -Letter. 

Poplar Springs _ _ 

Quankie. -Walter Bobbitt. 

Red Bud.-H. R. Griffin. 

Reedy Creek --W. H. Reed, B. P. Robertson, R. J. Harriss. 

Roanoke Rapids__G. G. O'Neal. 

Rosemary.. 

Rock Springs. -W. T. Howell, Wm. Wheeless, Henry Ethridge. 

Samaria- -J. H. Massey, W. B. Bergeron. 

Sandy Creek. .James K. Gilliam. 

Sharon. -J. H. Hicks, W. C. Parker, Henry White. 

Social Plains. -E. H. Puckett. 

South Henderson. -B. B. Collins. 

Sulpher Springs.. W. G. Wilson, J, L. Aycock. 

Turkey Branch ..By Letter. 

Vaughan__J. J. Marshall, B. 0. Riggan, J. G. Wright. 

Warren Plains. _W. E. Hawks, N. B. Weldon, Atlas Hicks. 

Warren ton.. J. H. Kerr, J. W. Allen, J. M. Gardner. 

White Level.. Clyde Bartholomew. 

Roll call completed and the Association was permanently or- 
ganized by the selection of former officers: G. M. Duke, Modera- 
tor and A. G. Willcox, Clerk and Treasurer. 

Bro. Joyner, pastor of the church extended to delegates and 
visitors a most cordial welcome which was responded to by Bro. 
J. H. Kerr most happily. 

New Churches making application for admission into our body 
was called for, and church at Kittrell applied, and brethren Paul 
Bowers, G. W. May and J. W. Sledge, were appointed a commit- 
tee to examine covenant and articles of said church. 

Committee on Order of Business made partial report as follows: 
2:30 p. m.. Aged Ministers and 3 p. m., Sunday Schools. 

REPORT ON AGED MINISTERS RELIEF. 

Report on aged ministers read by Bro. Joyner: 

It is a recognized principle that an individual who has grown 
old in the service of soine corporation should, when he reaches a 
stage of inactivity because of age and infirmity, be pension by 



that corporation. Viewing the church merely as a material cor- 
poration, and ministers as its servants, the church owes it as a 
moral and financial obligation to provide for those who have spent 
their lives in its service, when they become unable to support 
themselves; men in other walks of life, working for themselves, 
have an opportunity to lay up something for their old age. But 
no one can suppose that the ministers who are now too old to 
work could have accumulated anything for themselves. But 
there is a spiritual side which makes the obligation even 
greater. Preachers are God's ambassadors, and the treatment 
they receive at our hands is indictive of our attitude toward God. 
Spurgeon says, ' 'It is the disgrace of our denomination, as well as 
of many others, that not a few of the best of God's servants are 
toiling week-day and Sabbath after Sabbath, upon a miserable 
pittance scarcely sufficient to maintain the family even of a day 
laborer. ' ' 

There are in North Carolina about forty Elders in Israel who 
have worked faithfully for the Lord, and supported themselves 
and their families on their meagre salaries. They are now unable 
to work, and are asking the churches to provide for their old age. 
In no case is the amount called for large, but the little they do 
ask for is needed. In the state, contributions to this worthy 
object are increasing. A third of the amount contributed is set 
aside as a permanent interest bearing fund. May the amount in- 
crease until it is able to meet all the requirements made of it. 

But let us see what Tar River Association is doing in regard to 
this matter. In 1906 forty-nine churches contribed a total of 
$284.10; in 1907, twenty-eight churches raised $159.02; in 1908, 
fifteen churches reported ?G1,44. These things ought not so to be. 
It is not creditable to us as an Association ; nor does it show grati- 
tude for what God and His representatives have done for us. Let 
us resolve that such a condition shall no longer exist; that each 
church shall contribute to this object, and we shall not be found 
wanting even in the smallest requirement of duty. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. V. JOYNER. 

Bro. Hufham followed the report with an able address. A 
motion was offered by Bro. Taylor which was carried that the 
churches raise during the coming year $250.00 for this object, and 
a cash collection amounting to $11.14 was taken, after which the 
report was aaopted. 

The next business was report on Sunday Schools. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

The great commission which enjoins the duty of preaching the 
gospel to every creature also imposes the duty to teach the whole 



truth, the observance of all things commanded by Jesus. The 
teaching work, which falls so peculiarly within the scope of 
Sunday School operations, offers great opportunities of useful- 
ness to laborers in the Master's work. 

Therefore, Every Baptist Church ought to have an evergreen 
Sunday School with its opportunities of development to old and 
young and to the Christian and the unsaved, each according to 
his several needs. 

The time has come to the Tar River Association when its work 
must be the development of its churches to the highest efficiency, 
and this will require great advance in every department of our 
church life, particularly in the Sunday School. Here the work is 
notably weak in at least three particulars:—!. In teaching, 2. 
In equipment, 3. In class room. Clearly one cannot teach who 
has not first been a learner. Our Sunday Schools are filled with 
teachers who are good people after a fashion, but a fashion of 
undertaking to teach without either general or special prepara- 
tion. General preparation involves some general knowledge of the 
Bible and some general knowledge of teaching methods. Special 
preparation is the study of the particular lesson and how to teach 
it to the particular class. Courses of study have been arranged 
under competent supervision by the Sunday School Board of the 
Southern Baptist Convention which may be taken at home by cor-, 
respondence with only a small cost for necessary books. The 
general cultural value of this course ought to appeal very strongly 
to every Christian who has been denied good educational advata- 
ges, and the opportunity of at the same time making a worthy 
preparation for useful service ought to appeal irrisistably to every 
one who aspires to a life of usefulness and service. Full infor- 
mation concerning these courses may be had from our own State 
Sunday School Secretary, Bro. E. L. Middleton, Raleigh, N. C. 
Special preparation may be had from the lesson helps published 
by our own denomination, both at Nashville and Philadelphia. 

It is equally clear that it is not practicable for all of our workers 
to have libraries, maps, &c. , sufficiently complete for all the needs 
of modern educational work in the Sunday School. Yet it is 
entirely practicable for any Sunday School to have just such 
equipments, beginning in a small way with a small outlay of 
money, and gradually adding to the collection until every hopeful, 
aspiring, enthusiastic worker shall be able, right at his own door, 
to obtain that help which will enable him to grow into well-round- 
ed life and to become useful and efficient in Christian services. 
These two may be procured from our own Board. 

Not less certain, nor less important so far as efficiency is con- 
cerned, is the need for proper rooms for classes. There is no 
doubt that good has been done and may be done with a whole 



school in the church building. But every earnest teacher who is 
deeply concerned to make a certain impression upon his pupils and 
to store their minds with clear knowledge of scripture truths, 
must go from his class discouraged, despondent and almost heart 
broken because their attention has been detracted by the con- 
fusion of sights and sounds around them so that most important 
truths have scarcely touched the surface of their minds. Es- 
pecially is it imperative to have separate rooms for the larger 
classes, such as the infant or primary classes and those of young 
men and young women. The cost will not be great, but the ad- 
vantages will be very great. 

'This report will touch upon only one other subject. What shall 
take the place of the Evergreen School. We have emphasized 
the importance of having Sunday School twelve months in the 
year. We would add to that emphasis if possible. But some 
schools still think they cannot have these. Shall the work stop 
entirely? Fortunately and agency has been devised for other 
purposes which may be adapted to this situation. It will be en- 
tirely practicable for those to stay at home who cannot go 
to church. The Home Department has been provided for certain 
who cannot go to Sunday School. Let it be used by all during 
the closed season. Let all have their supplies as if at the school. 
Let the family have its bible study hour, its collection, its report. 
Let all be sent in to the Secretary at the church on preaching 
Sunday, when fresh supplies may be given out, and the reports 
read and discussed. The spring opening then may furnish a well 
prepared school, ready organized and interested, instead of the 
disorganized crowd who have lost all touch with the work and the 
study. Let us move forward to better things. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. B. DANIEL. 

Bro. Daniel following his report with an address. Brethren 
C. E. Hoyle and G. G. O'Neal also made able addresses, after 
which report was adopted. Visiting brethren were invited to 
seats among us, which was accepted by Bro. J. S. Farmer, repre- 
senting Biblical Recorder. Bro, J. G. Blalock and Bro. Noah 
Biggs, of Roanoke Association. New Pastors who have come 
among us were welcomed among us and responded to by Brethren 
G. G. O'Neal, W. L. Swope andGeo. Tunstall. 

Committee on Digest of Church Letters appointed— J. R. Doan 
and Paul Bowers. On Time, Place and Preacher for next session — 
G. W. May, W. L. Swope and J. W. Sledge. 

Report of Historian was called for and Bro. Duke made state- 
ment as to the condition or progress of the work, and by motion 
the same committee continued with Bro. Ivey Allen added. Ad- 
journed with prayer by Bro. Swope. 



TUESDAY NIGHT SESSION. 

The Association re-assembled and after praise service the 
special order was State Missions and the report was read by Bro. 

Swope. 

Report on State Missions for the Year 1 909. 

We cannot improve upon the wisdom and excellence of the plan 
given by our Saviour to His disciples when He committed to them 
the work of preaching the gospel to all the people. He said they 
should be witnesses to Him first at Jerusalem, then in Samaria, 
and unto the uttermost parts of the earth. 

Our Lord's will was to have the gospel of salvation preached 
first to the Jews, then to the people next to them, and then where 
ever people should be found. 

To save our people at home is to furnish a basis for world-wide 
evangehzation, which is the primary business of every Christian. 
So, then, the actual work of State Missions is not simply to evan- 
gelize our own state, but to make it a means to a much larger end. 
The evangelization of N. C. and every other state under the stars 
and stripes is fundamental to the evangelization of the world. 
State Evangelization is at the basis of Christianity in all the terri- 
tory fostered by the Home Board of the Sonthern Baptist Conven- 
tion: And aside from all this. State Missions is largely the cause 
of such marvelous strides in the Education of great numbers of 
our people. 

However, the work of the State Mission Board, since its organi- 
zation has been one of strengthening weak and struggling churches 
within the bounds of our state, and planting and sustaining 
churches in places of destitution. Many of our churches that are 
to-day strong and liberal, have in the not far distant past felt the 
strong arm and moulding impress of our State Mission Board. 

Every Baptist in the State ought to be eager to see the work of 
his denomination pushed with vigor. 

This work at our very doors surely merits our first attention. 
We must not grow weary in urging the claims of our own state 
upon the hearts of our people until they realize its supreme im- 
portance. 

We pastors can not escape our responsibility in this matter. 
During the year now closing, the general character of the work 
has been excellent, and the results very gratifying. 

Let us praise God for the success that has attended the conse- 
crated efforts of our beloved Secretary and his co-laborers. The 
work of the Board this year was mapped out on a basis of 
$40,000.00 in accordance with the vote of the Convention to raise 
that amount. Here is a brief summary of the work done by the 
Board the past year. Number of Missionaries at work, 148. 



Number of baptized by missionaries, 2,047. Associations in which 
the Board is working, Chowan, Neuse-Atlantic, Tar River, John- 
son, Raleigh, Mt. Zion, Piedmont, Pilot Mountain, South Yadkin, 
Mecklenburg-Cabarrus, and South Fork. Within the past ten 
years, it has organized 513 churches with 61,195 members, who 
have contributed $54,820.05 the past year. The pressing needs of 
the work at present are more money and better equipped men. 

If the Board had sufficient money at its command it could get 
better equipped men to do its work. 

Brethren, let us do more for the great cause which begins at 
our own doors and extends to the uttermost parts of the earth. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. W. SWOPE. 

The report was followed with able addresses by brethren G. W. 
May, G. G. O'Neal, J. R. Doan, J. D.Hufham and Duke. Report 
adopted. Motion by Bro. Marshall that Bro. Doan furnish his 
sermon to Recorder for publication was carried unanimously. 
Adjourned with prayer by Bro. Coppedge. 

WEDNESDAY-9:30. 

The Association came .together and praise service lead by Bro. 
Blalock. Minutes of yesterday read and approved. The hour for 
special order Ministerial Education having arrived in the absence 
of a report Bro. W. R. Cullom addressed the body. 

Report on Ministerial Education. 

The polishing of the lamp which sits on the center table, is but 
the reflection of the hostess, thoughtfulness for their company, 
so the polishing of the ministry, through the training of the mind, 
is the churches effort to attract the world to herself. The minis- 
try needs to be trained, so that it can reason clearly, logically, 
and accurately to the world concerning eternal things and their 
relation to material things. They need education that they may 
be able to meet the arguments of error. They need to be able to 
meet the theorizer, with the facts of sacred writ. They must be 
trained, so that with all the force of their natural ability, they 
may appeal to men to turn unto God. The strength of any army 
lies in its Generals, for here is training and discipline for the rank 
and file, and confidence, which gives courage in the hour of battle. 

The General plans the battle and in wise plans lies the victory. 
Let us therefore make our contributions larger for this purpose, 
that we may put trained men on every field. 

G. W. MAY. 

Committee on New Churches reported as follows: We the Com- 
mittee on New Churches wish to report in favor of the acceptance 



10 



of the First Baptist church of Kittrell at the recomendation of 
Bro. J. W. Sledge, he being moderator of the presbytery, and 
testifying that the articles of faith, and constitution and by-laws 
are regular according to Baptist usage. 

J. P. BOWERS, 
J. W. SLEDGE, 
G. W. MAY. 

The Moderator gave right hand of fellowship to delegates L. A. 
Johnson and J. B. Dickson. 

The next business was report on Periodicals, and in absence of 
report, Bro. J. S. Farmer told of the Recorder and the importance 
of every Baptist taking the paper and informing themselves as to 
the work of the denomination. 

At this hour the Farmville Church come up, and Bro. Biggs, 
followed by Bro. Blalock told of the needs of this important and 
destitute field, and the building of the house of worship and asked 
for help to complete and to pay the indebtedness on said house 
and the roll of churches was called and the amounts below pledged 
for same: 



Bear Swamp, $ 2.50 

Bethlehem, 2.50 

Brown's, 5.00 

Gary Ghapel 2.50 

Castaha, 2.50 

Cedar Rock, 2.50 

Cypress Chapel, 2.50 

Corinth, 5.00 

Enterprise, 5.00 

Ephesus 5.00 

Gardner's 5.00 

Harriss Chapel, 10. 00 

Henderson 10.00 

Joyner's Chapel 2.50 

Littleton, 10.00 

Rock Spring, 5.00 

Samaria, 5.00 

Sharon. 5.00 

Sulphur Springs, 5.00 

Warrenton, 5.00 

Kittrells, L 5.00 

Chas. Wheless, 1.00 



Amount forwarded $103.50 

Louisburg, 25.00 

Macon, 5.00 

Maple Spring, 10.00 

Midway, 2.00 

Mountain Grove 2.50 

Mt. Zion 2.50 

New Bethel, 5.00 

New Sandy Creek, 2. 50 

North Henderson, 2.50 

Philadelphia 2.50 

Poplar Springs 10.00 

Quankie 5. 00 

Red Bud, 2.50 

Reedy Creek 2.50 

Roanoke Rapids 10.00 

Rosemary 2.50 

Sandy Creek, 3.00 

South Henderson, 2.50 

Warren Plains, 2.50 

W. E. Bowers, paid 10.00 

Bethesda, 6.00 



$103.50 

After which, by a motion of Bro. 
it $500. by Jan'y. 1st, 1910. 



$219.50 
Doan that the churches make 



11 

Report of Executive Committee. 

To the Tar River Baptist Association:— Your Executive Com- 
mittee respectfully reports that it organized soon after the adjourn- 
ment of your last session by the selection of Thomas M. Pittman 
as Chairman, and Ivey Allen as Secretary and Treasurer. Two 
lines of work were determined upon. 1st— The assistance of 
needy churches. 2nd— The occupancy of fields which give promise 
of organizing efficient Baptist work. 

In the prosecution of the first appropriations were made in aid 
of Roanoke Rapids and Rosemary churches in Halifax County; 
Mt. Harmon church in Nash County; North Henderson and South 
Henderson churches in Vance County. The Roanoke Rapids and 
Rosemary field was occupied by Elder F. F. Brown as pastor, 
without aid from the Association until about May. Elder G. G. 
O'Neal was secured as his successor and assumed pastoral charge 
of the churches on the third Sunday in August, whose salary is 

$ of which the Association contributes $25. per month. 

Elder Johnson served the churches as supply about three 

months, receiving from the association $25. per month. 

These churches have a membership of some and their work 

is principally among the officers and employes of the manufactur- 
ing enterprises about Roanoke Rapids. The prospective increase 
in the number of such enterprises and of the net population, ren- 
ders this field one of great importance. 

Mt. Harmon church is under the pastoral care of Elder T. D. 

Bunn, it has a membership of and pays a salary of $ 

of which the Association contributes $75.00. 

North and South Henderson are united in one field— Elder 0. N. 
Marshall was pastor at the beginning of the year. The last report 

showed a membership of in the two churches. The resident 

active membership was much below that number. The pastor's 
salary indefinite and the whole arrangement unsatisfactory. The 
contribution at the rate of $25 per month was continued, however, 
Bro. Marshall resigned this field about the first of May, and in 
the making of a new arrangement it was stipulated that we would 
pay only one third of the salary . Elder H. T. Stevens was en- 
gaged as supply for three months at $75 per month, of which the 
Association paid one-third. The arrangement was most fortunate. 
He held meetings which resultea in about forty or more accessions 
to each church, and leaving the churches in better shape than for 
some years. Elder Jere Reeves has been secured as pastor to 
this field. He comes with an excellent reputation as a pastor, 
and entered upon his work the first of October. Our appropria- 
tion towards his salary holds good until Jan'y. 1st, 1910, at the 



12 

rate of $25 per month. He is to receive a like amount from each 
church. 

In prosecuting the second branch of our work, we have concerned 
ourselves with four points: Elder A, G. Willcox, known to the 
brethren for his wisdom and zeal has preached at Alsop's Chapel 
in Halifax County, and at Vicksboro on the Warren and Vance 
line, receiving for his services at the former $75 and at the latter 
$40. It is thought that it will be practicable to organize a church 
at Alsops during the coming year. The wisdom of an organiza- 
tion at Vicksboro has not yet been fully determined. Its strategis 
position however makes it desirable that its availability as the 
location for a Baptist Church shall be further considered. 

At Norlina in Warren County, Elder G. Tunstall has supplied 
upon an appropriation of $40. This work progresses so favorably 
as to warrant the hope that a church may be organized at that 
place during the next year. 

An appropriation was made in aid of a proposed work at Kittrells. 
The appropriation has not been required so far. 

A church has been organized under most hopeful and encourag- 
ing auspices. A meeting was held by our supply missionary at 
North and South Henderson without cost to this committee. There 
were fourteen baptisms and others await the ordinance. A lot 
has been donated for the church building and a fund for its erect- 
ion has been started. 

In addition to the work prosecuted during the past year, your 
committee think it wise to engage a suitable brother for evange- 
listic service during a portion of next year, say for two or three 
months, in aid of work at points where we are seeking to estab- 
lish churches. 

There are not many missionary fields within the bounds of this 
Association, and its greatest efforts must of necessity be directed 
to bringing our churches to a higher state of efficiency. An 
earnest effort should be made, bring the churches to such a state 
of efficiency that a service shall be rendered to every member, 
and that every member shall render a service to his church and a 
contribution to every object of the church and of the denomina- 
tion, 

THOMAS M. PITTMAN, Chrm. 

The hour for special order having arrived, Bro. Ivey Allen read 
report for Bro. Pitman and after discussion by Brothers Doan, 
Sledge, Allen and Taylor, the roll of churches was called and 
pledges taken for State Missions as follows: 

Antioch, $10.00 Gardner's, $ 10.00 

BearSwamp, 25.00 Harris's Chapel, 30.00 

Bethesda, _^ 13 00 Henderson, 175.00 

Bethlehem, 10.00 Joyner's Chapel, : 15.00 



13 

Brown's, 60.00 Littleton, 60.00 

Gary Chapel, 18.00 Louisburg 175.00 

Castalia, 25.00 Macon, 30.00 

Cedar Rock, 25.00 Maple Springs, 35.00 

Crocker's Chapel, Marmaduke, 10.00 

Corinth, 5.00 Middleburg, 45.00 

Cypress Chapel, 15.00 Midway, 10.00 

Enterprise, 15.00 Mountain Grove, 10.00 

Ephesus, 10.00 Mt. Herman, 5.00 

Mt, Hebron, 5.00 Rocky Springs, 

Mt. Zion, 25.00 Samaria, 35.00 

New Bethel, 40.00 Sandy Creek, 30.00 

New Sandy Creek, Sharon, 40.00 

North Henderson, 25.00 Social Plains, 5.00 

Peach Tree, 15. 00 South Henderson. 15. 00 

Philadelphia, 25. 00 Sulphur Springs, 15. 00 

Poplar Springs. 75.00 Turkey Branch, 10.00 

Quankie, 12.00 Vaughans, 12.00 

Red Bud, 20.00 Warren Plains, 25.00 

Reedy Creek, 20.00 Warrenton, 50.00 

Roanoke Rapids, 50. 00 White Level, 5. 00 

Rosemary, 10.00 Kittrell, 5.00 



Total, - - $857.00 

The Report as amended was adopted. Adjourned for dinner. 

WEDNESDAY— 1:30 P. M. 

Association led in prayer by Bro. Marshall. The following 
resolution by Bro. Doan was carried: 

Resolved, that the work formerly carried on under the topic 
of Associational Missions be executed through the State Mission 
Board. 

Orphanage Report. 

At Thomasville, N. C.,the Baptist have a great Orphanage. 
We have 450 acres of land, dormitories, school buildings, infirm- 
ary, work shops, printing press, cows, mules and horses. There 
are 34 employees, 10 teachers in the graded school, a pastor, Rev. 
T. S. Crutchfield, and 390 children. Here is training for hand, 
head and heart. 

We are glad to report that the health of the Institution has been 
excellent during the past year, there has been no serious sickness. 
The Institution is supported by the free will offerings of the 
people. We recommend: — 1st. A monthly collection from every 
Sunday School. 2nd. A special Thanksgiving offering from every 



14 

church. 3rd. A club of subscribers to Charity and Children, in 
every Sunday School. Jesus took little children in his arms and 
blessed them. In the Thomasville Orphanage we see the arms of 
Jesus lengthened by means of the Baptist of the State, enfolding 
in their loving embrace 390 children, feeding, clothing, educating 
and training them — thus blessing them. God bless our Orphanage! 

Respectfully, 

J. R. DOAN, 

Report on Orphanage was the order for this hour, which was 
read by Bro. Doan, after which Bro. Kesler, the General Manager, 
made a most interesting address and a cash collection followed 
amounting to $16.75, after which report w^as adopted. 

Report on Foreign Missions. 

We believe in missions because seeking and saving the lost is 
the great work committed to us by our Savior. We believe in 
Foreign Missions because our Savior said: "Go ye into all the 
world and preach the gospel to every creature," and nothing short 
of an honest effort to comply witht his last command of our blessed 
Lord will please Him, or satisfy the conscience of a truly regener- 
ate person. 

When Jesus established his church in the world, he set before 
it one definite obligation: "Preach the gospel to every creature," 
more than eighteen hundred years have passed away, and many 
millions of christians, possessed of ample means for carrying out 
the last command of the Savior, have lived, and yet the great 
commission has not been obeyed. 

When the Southern Baptist Convention was organized in 1845 
it set before it as its principal work the duty of preaching the 
gospel to every creature. This work has been slow, not because 
God was unwilling to give us the victory; but because we have 
been unwilling to come up as we ought ' 'to the help of the Lord 
against the mighty." If the Baptists of the South had given 
themselves to the Lord for this great work, as they could have 
done, long before now every human being in this world would 
have heard the gospel that saves. 

Notwithstanding our unfaithfulness God has wonderfully bles- 
sed us in this work, and many heathens have been saved, churches 
have been organized, appliances for carrying forward the work 
have been established in the various mission fields, interest and 
resources in the home churches have been greatly increased; and 
the working forces in heathen lands have been largely multiphed. 

During last year, twenty-one new missionaries were sent out; 
and we now have on the Foreign field 231 missionaries, and 375 
native helpers, which gives a total of 606 active workers. 



15 

The conditions on our Foreign fields are most encouraging. At 
the last report there were 259 churches, 569 out-stations and 
16,596 members. There were 162 houses of worship, 325 Sunday 
schools, and 10,430 scholars. These churches and missionaries 
out of their poverty contributed last year to the spread of the 
gospel $40,287. When we add to these things the schools that 
have been established for boys and girls, the training schools for 
preachers, the medical missionaries and hospitals, the printing 
presses and the books, tracts, and periodicals that are being bub- 
lished for distribution and especially when we remember the 2,905 
converts baptized last year we thank God and take courage. 

The total amount contributed last year by our people to carry 
on this great work was $460,797. This was a gain of $58, 000 over 
the previous year. The last convention decided to work this year 
on a basis of $537,500. Every dollar of this amount is needed to 
carry on the work. If every dollar is received there will still be 
but little room for enlargement of the work. The condition of 
the field demands enlargement. The God whom we serve says: 
"Go forward," and shall we stand still? No, no, a thousand times 
no! We can, we must, we will enlarge our work. 

We can enlarge. Of the 21,296 churches in the bounds of the 
Southern Baptist Convention only 11,178 contributed anything to 
Foreign Missions last year, leaving 10,118 churches which gave 
nothing to this great cause. This n;eans that nearly one half of 
our churches did not give one cent to Foreign Missions last year, 
and yet they call themselves Baptists, and say they love the Lord 
Jesus. Here, my dear brethren, is our opportunity to enlarge. 
If we we can lead these 10,000 non-contributing churches to make 
an offering to the Lord for Foreign Missions, we can add fifty 
per cent to our working forces in one year, and if we continue to 
go forward at the ratio indicated, the world will be evangelized 
by Baptist effort within the present generation. This matter is 
in the hands of our pastors; for there is not a pastor in the land 
who cannot secure a contribution from his church, if he makes an 
honest, earnest effort. 

To help us in this work the Foreign Mission Journal will be 
furnished by the Board for 25 cents a year and it is full of just 
those inspiring, helpful facts that pastors and people need. The 
Board will also furnish free for distribution tracts and leaflets to 
all who apply. Helpful and instructive books on missions can be 
procured from the Board. Write for catalogue to the Foreign 
Mission Board, Richmond, Va. 

Mission study classes should be organized in all of our churches; 
for our people need instruction. Inform them and they will go 
forward. 



16 

What will the Tar River Association do in this great matter? Let 
us as the representatives of our churches answer. Therefore, 
I venture to offer in conclusion this resolution as an expression of 
our desire and purpose. 

Resolved, That we undertake to raise in compliances with the 
request of the Foreign Mission Board during the ensuing associa- 
tional year, twelve hundred and seventy-five dollars for Foreign 
Missions, and that the Executive Committee be instructed to 
indicate to the churches the sum that it will be necessary for each 
of them to contribute in order to raise this amount. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. J. TAYLOR. 

Report on Foreign Missions was called for by the order of busi- 
ness which was read by Bro. T. J. Taylor, who followed in an able 
address. Bro. Doan also made an address and statement in 
regard to the church building at Kittrell and the roll of churches 
was called and the following made pledges. 

Brown's, $ 5.00 Amount forwarded, $92.00 

Gary's Chapel, 2.50 Middleburg, 10.00 

Cedar Rock, 2.00 New Bethel, 15.00 

Cypress Chapel, 2.00 North Henderson, 5.00 

Enterprise, 2.50 Poplar Spring, 2.00 

Gardner's, 2.00 Red Bud, 2.00 

Henderson, 30.00 Roanoke Rapids, 5.00 

Littleton, 5.00 Rosemary, _. 2.00 

Louisburg, 25.00 Samaria, 5.00 

Macon, 2.00 Sandy Creek, 2.00 

Maple Spring, 2. 00 South Henderson, 2. 50 

Marmaduke, 2.00 Sulphur Springs, 2.00 

Warrenton, 10.00 W. M. S. Warren Plains, 2.50 



$92.00 $147.00 

After which the report was adoped. 

Committee on time, place and preacher for next session report 
New Bethel as the place, time Tuesday after first Sunday in Oct. 
1910, at 11 o'clock. Rev. Mc. Stamps as preacher, Bro. A. V. 
Joyner alternate. 

G. W. MAY, 
J. W. SLEDGE, 
L. W. SWOPE. 
Executive Committee for next year appointed to be the same as 
last year, and by special motion the Moderator was added. 

Moderator appointed W. M. Boon as Auditor of the Association. 
Bro. Ivey Allen Treasurer of the Executive Committee offered his 
report which was audited and afterwards report was examined 
and approved- 

W. M. BOON, Auditor. 



17 

Financial Report Executive Committee. 

I. Allen In account with Ex. Com. Tar River Association. 

Dr. 

To amount received from Finance Committee, $968 64 

To amount received from Henderson Church, ____ 31 36 
To amount received from W. M. S. Gardner Ch. . _ 5 00 

To amount received from Joyners Chapel, 3 00 

To amount received from Interest, 24 30 

$1032 30 
Cr. 

Amt. paid A. G. Willcox forAlsop's Chapel, $ 18 75 

Apr. 20 Amt. paid A. G. Willcox for Alsop's Chapel, 18 75 

Apr. 30, Amt. paid 0. N. Marshall, N. & S. Henderson, _ . ICO 00 

May 13, Amt. paid Geo. T. Tunstall, Norlina, 10 00 

June 2, Amt. paid D. T. Bunn, Mt. Hermon, 37 50 

July 15, Amt. paid A. G. Willcox, Alsop's Chap & Vicksboro 33 75 

Aug. 23, Amt. paid G. T. Tunstall, Norhna, : 10.00 

Aug. 23, Amt. paid E. N. Johnson, Roanoke Rapids, 50 00 

Aug, 30, Amt paid H. T. Stevenson N. & S. Henderson, 75 00 

Sept. 1, Amt. paid A. G. Willcox, Alsop's Chap. & Vicksboro 26 25 

Sept. 17, Amt. paid G. G. O'Neill, Roanoke Rapids, 25 00 

Oct. 2, Amt. paid D. T. Bunn, Mt. Hermon, 18 75 

Oct. 2, Amt. paid G. T. Tunstall, Norlina, 10 00 



$432 7.' 



Balance on hand $599 55. 

Examined and approved, 

W. M, BOONE. 

Committee on Digest of Church Letters report as follows: Find- 
ing that all the information and more given in the digest of church 
letters is found in the other Statistical Tables printed in the 
Minutes. 2nd, That the Committee cannot get the letters early 
enough in the meeting of the Association to make said report of 
practical value during the sessions of the body. Your Committee 
recommend that the report on digest of church letters be discon- 
tinued. 

Respectfully, 

J. R. DOAN, 
J. P. BOWERS. 

After announcements Association adjourned with prayer by 
Bro. Riggan. 



18 
^' WEDNESDAY NIGHT- 7:30. 

The Association came together and after the usual prayer and 
praise service, the hour for special order Home Missions came up. 

Report on Home Missions. 

The work of our Home Mission Board compares favorably- with 
that of similar organizations, 

The safe-keeping of the destiny of the South is in the hands of 
^his Board so far as the Baptists are concerned. 

We are rapidly changing from an agricultural to a manufactur- 
ing people. This, with great influx of outside capital, the hordes 
of foreigners that are pouring into the South, the negro problem, 
the construction of the Panama Canal, and the cry of Cuba for 
thp Gospel. All these things bring a very difficult problem to the 
I^me Board. But the great wisdom and faith of our Secretary 
Rev. B. D. Gray, and the increasing interest among cur people, 
give reason for encouragement. 

From the Home Mission Board (See Report in State Convention 
Minutes) we get some faint idea of the magnitude of the work. 
"a Southern Territory embracing all of the Southern States 
together with Cuba, Panama and the Isle of Pines, containing 
more than 25,000,000 people, 9,000,000 of whom are negroes and 
5,000,000 foreigners. 

The mountain regions of North and South Carolina, Georgia, 
Alabama, Tenn, and Kentucky, comprising 149 counties and a 
population af 2,000,000, 98 per cent of whom are white and 65 per 
cent Baptist. 

Then our great and grov/ing cities, into which has gathered 
about 40 per cent of our population where the young men and 
young women of the country flock, and added to this the rapidly 
increasing foreign element, 1,100,000 annually, which does not 
come from the better classes but very largely from the riff raff." 

In the Providence of God, Home Mission work is enlarging its 
place in the hearts of Southern Baptists. 

We enumerate five lines of work which especially enlist the 
utmost endeavors of the Home Board. 

1. The favor of God is upon our work in Cuba where an open 
door with great opportunities and large responsibilities, call loudly 
for more workers and larger equipment. This is practically a 
foreign mission work which has fallen, by proximity, into the 
hands of the Home Board. 

2. The negroes hving at cur doors are giving us ever increas- 
ing oppertunities for evangelistic work among them. Nothing 
but the Gospel of Jesus Christ can make a negro work who is 
shiftless or moral and honest who is thieving and unclean. Our 



19 

plan of co-operation with the Negro National Convention makes 
possible the most effective work on the most economical basis. 

3/ Mission School work, among the 2,000,000 mountaineers of 
the Appalachian Mountains, there are 18 schools under the super- 
vision of the Home Board, and they have more pupils than they 
can accommodate, properly. Most of the mountain people are 
Baptists, hitherto cut off from modern civilization and their de- 
velopment and training will largely rest with these schools. 

4. The great South Western Frontier, rich in soil, minerals, 
timber and climate, that is now attracting the worlds tide of 
imigration, offers the greatest opportunity for Home Mission 
work, perhaps of any territory in the world. 

5. The crying destitution in our great Cities. We mention St. 
Louis, with 750,000 souls and less than 10,000 white Baptists, 
New Orleans, with 300,000 souls and about 1000 white Baptists, 
Memphis, with 130,000 souls and only about 3000 white Baptists, 
besides the destitution in many more of our large Cities. Help 
now may save the situation, hereafter may be too late. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. STAMPS. 

Report was amended by a resolution to raise $800 during the 
coming year. 

Report was read by Bro. Doan for Chairman and was discussed 
by brethren Sledge, Marshall, Duke, Watkins, and report adopted. 

Tar River Association 

In accouht with A. G. Willcox, Treasurer, Oct. 1908. 

Amt. rec'd. from Finance Com. for State Missions $ 3 00 

Amt. rec'd. from Finance Com. for Home Missions 6 50 

Amt. rec'd. from Finance Com. for Foreign Missions 5 50 

Amt. rec'd. from Finance Com. for Orphanage 20 19 

Amt. rec'd. from Finance Com, for Aged Ministers 11 91 

Amt. rec'd. from Finance Com. for Minutes . 54 84 

Cash collected for Minutes 5 41 

Cash collected for Orphanage 16 00 

Rec'd. from New Bethel for Minutes _J 1 00 

Rec'd. from Littleton for Minutes 1 00 

Rec'd. from Poplar Springs for Minutes 1 1 20 

Rec'd. from Cedar Rock for Minutes .. 1 35 

Rec'd. from Joyner's Chapel for Minutes J 2 50 

Rec'd. from Enterprise for Minutes 1 00 

Rec'd. from Vaughans for Minutes 2 00 

Rec'd. from Samaria for Minutes 1 00 

Rec'd. from Sulphur Springs for Minutes 1 00 



20 

Rec'd, from Joyner's Chapel for Associational Missions.. _ 3 00 

Rec'd. from Joyner's Chapel for State Missions 2 00 

Rec'd. from Joyner's Chapel for Home Missions 2.00 

Rec'd. from Joyner's Chapel for Foreign Missions 2 00 

Rec'd. from Joyner's Chapel for S. School Missions 1 00 

Rec'd. from Joyner's Chapel for Educational Missions 1 00 

Rec'd. from Joyner's Chapel for Aged Ministers 1 00 

Rec'd. from Joyner's Chapel for Orphanage 1 50 

Rec'd. from W. M. Society Gardners church Asso'nl. Miss. 5 00 

Total,_-__ $153 90 

Disbursements. 

By amt. paid Walter Durham, State Missions $ 3 00 

By amt. paid Walter Durham, Home Missions 6 50 

By amt. paid Walter Durham, Foreign Missions 5 50 

By amt. paid Walter Durham Aged Ministers 11 91 

By amt. paid Walter Durham Joyners Chapel State Miss. _ _ 2 00 
By amt. paid Walter Durham Joyners Chapel Home Miss. 2 00 
By amt. paid Walter Durham Joyners Chapel Foreign Miss. _ 2 00 

By amt. paid Walter Durham Joyners Chapel S. S. Miss 1 00 

By amt. paid Walter Durham Joyners Chapel Education. __ 1 00 
By amt. paid Walter Durham Joyners Chapel Aged Ministers 1 00 

By amt. paid S. H. Averett Joyners Chapel Orphanage 1 50 

By amt. paid I. Allen Joyners Chapel Associational Miss. _ 3 00 
By amt. paid I. Allen, W. M. So. Gardners church Asso. M. 5 00 

By amt. C. V. Moore, printing Minutes 50 00 

Clerks Fee 25 00 

Blank Church Letters and mailing same 67 

Paper, Mailing Manuscript, Posting, Etc 1 00 

M, L. Kesler cash collected for Orphanage 16 00 

S. H. Averett for Orphanage • 20 19 

Total, $158 27 

Bal due Treasurer $4 37. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. G. WILLCOX, Treasurer. 
Examined and approved, 

W. M. BOONE. 

Treasurers Report read and approved. Balance due Treasurer 
raised. 

By a special motion $200 in hand of Treasurer of Executive 
Committee is to be applied to building of church at Kittrells. 

Adjourned with prayer by Bro. Riggan. 



21 
THURSDAY 10:00 A. M. 

The Association met and spent half an hour in praise service 
led by Bro. Riggan, Minutes of yesterday read and approved. 

Report of Vice President of W. M. U. of Tar River Association 
to the General Association. 

The Woman's Missionary Union Auxiliary to the Tar River As- 
sociation submit the follov/ing report: 

We met in annual session with the Woman's Missionary Society 
of Louisburg Baptist Church on September 29th and 30th, 1909 
and held a very enthusiastic and spiritual meeting. We have 17 
W. M. S., 2 Y. W. A.. 7 Sunbeams and 1 Royal Ambassador or- 
ganization, and these 27 organizations are planning to raise $800. 
for the various objects of the convention next year. 

It is our purpose to strive to enlist new members in the socie- 
ties already organized and to encourage the organization of 
societies where there are none. 

We feel that our societies are proving means of developing their 
members into earnest christian workers in the churches of which 
they are a part and we are praying that the coming year may 
show still greater development along this line. We are also 
praying that we may so completely surrender ourselves to God 
that we may be willing to be used of Him where, and as He will. 

To the accomplishment of these ends we ask the hearty co-opera- 
tion, prayers and sympathy of every member of the Tar River 
Association. 

MISS SALLIE ALLEN, 

Associational Vice-President. 

Womans work was the order for the hour and Bro. Taylor read 
the repport of Vice President and after an address by said'brother 
the report was adopted. 

Report on Temperance. 

It should not longer be necessary to urge upon church members 
the duty of Temperance in all things, especially in the matter of 
intoxicating drinks. This duty we owe to ourselves, to those of 
our household, and to our neighbors. We are glad that indul- 
gence in strong drinks have become disreputable. 

We think it the duty of church members especially to Fee that 
the prohibition law is strongly enforced. It is the cause for pro- 
found gratitude to know that the prohibition law is resulting in 
the diminishing use of liquor and as it shall be generally enforced 
it will still further diminish their use. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. V. JOYNER. 



22 

Report on Temperance was next order and Bro. Joyner read 
report for chairman and after speaking on the report it was fur- 
ther discussed by brethren May and Loyd, it was adopted. 

At this hour Prof. Hobgood, President of Oxford Female Col- 
lege came before the body and addressed same in interest of his 
school. 

Bro. May offered the following report on Periodicals which was 
adopted: — Resolved that we heartily commend the Bibhcal Record- 
er, Foreign Mission Journal, The Home Field, Charity and Child- 
ren, and the Sunday School periodicals of the Sunday School Board 
at Nashville, Tenn. and the American Baptist Pubhcation Society 
to the patronage of our churches and Sunday Schools. Bro. 
Taylor offered the following, which was carried: That the Execu- 
tive Committee be authorized to expend what of balance may be 
left in hands of the Treasurer of the Executive Committee for the 
expense of the Historian in preparing the history of the Tar River 
Association, and that if there is not sufficient to cover the matter 
of any balance to the churches. 

Report of Finance Committee. 

Your Committee submit the following report in church letters. 

For Associational Missions, $ 905 19 

For State Missions, 7 97 

For Foreign Missions, 16 45 

For Home Missions, 2 02 

For Orphanage, 14 68 

For Ministers Relief Fund, 12 08 

For Ministerial Education 3 31 

For Minute Fund, 66 79 

$ 1028 79 
Came into the hands of your Committee, $ 1012 76 



$ 15 73 
W. E. BOWERS, 
S. R. DUKE, 
W. C. PARKER. 

Committee. 

Associational Missions Transferred to the State Board of Missions. 

Resolved: 1 — That the Tar River Association carry on its 
"Associational" Mission work through the State Board of Missions, 

2. — That all money sent to the Association for "Associational 
Missions" be forwarded to Walter Durham, (Treasurer) for State 

Missions. 



23 

3.— That the Executive Committee of our Association be request- 
ed to recommend to the State Board, the points in the Tar River 
Association needing aid, suggesting also the amount of aid to be 
given each place. 

T. R. DOAN. 

The following resolution v^as offered by Bro. May which was 
adopted by a rising vote. Resolved that we the delegates and 
visitors of the Tar River Association extend heartfelt thanks and 
appreciation to the church, pastor and citizens of Wise for their 
open hearted hospitality and sympathetic care of us while with 
them. 

Clerk was instructed to have usual number of minutes printed, 
and to receive usual compensation and to draw on Treasurer of 
Executive Committee for balance needed to defray expenses 
of same. 

Delegates to Baptist State Convention appointed as follows: — 
G. M. Duke, Ivey Allen, A. G. Willcox and J. W. Sledge. 

Bro. G. M. Duke delegate to Southern Baptist. G. W. May, 
Alternate. Resolution offered by Bro. Daniel which was adopted 
by a rising vote. Resolved: That we tender our Moderator our 
thanks for the able and impartial way in which he has presided 
over us. Bro. Loyd led in the closing prayer, ''God be with you 
'till we meet again, " and the parting hand was given and the 
Moderator declared the Tar River Association adjourned to meet 
with the church at New Bethel, Vance County, on Tuesday after 
the first Sunday in Oct. 1910, at eleven o'clock. 

G. M. DUKE, Moderator. 
A. G. WILLCOX, Clerk and Treasurer. 



24 

Tar River Association — Times and Places of Meetings. 

1. Sandy Creek, Franklin county, commencing on fourth Sun- 
day in October, 1831. 

2. Maple Springs, Franklin county, commencing on Thursday 
before fourth Sunday in October, 1832. 

3. Hickory Chapel, Nash county, Thursday before fourth 
Sunday in October, 1833. 

4. Brown's, Warren county, Saturday before fourth Sunday 
in October, 1834. 

5. Red Bud, Frankhn county, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
October, 1835. 

6. Shiloh, Franklin county, 23-25th of October, 1836. 

7. Peach Tree, Nash county, Saturday before fourth Sunday in 
October, 1837. 

8. Reedy Creek, Warren county, Friday before fourth Sunday 
in October, 1838. 

9. Flat Rock, Franklin county, Saturday before fourth Sun- 
day in October, 1839. 

10. Bear Swamp, Halifax county, Saturday before fourth Sun- 
day in October, 1840. 

11. Louisburg, Saturday before first Sunday in October, 1841. 

12. Gardner's Warren county, October, 1842. 

13. Poplar Springs, Franklin county, Friday before first Sun- 
day in October, 1843. 

14. Brown's, Warren county, Saturday before first Sunday in 
October, 1844. 

15. Maple Springs, Franklin county, Saturday before first Sun- 
day in October, 1845. 

16. Sandy Creek, Franklin county, 24th October, 1846. 

17. Enon, Warren county, Friday before first Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1847. 

18. Hickory, Nash county, Friday before first Sunday in 
October, 1848. 

19. Haywood's (now Corinth), Franklin county, Friday before 
first Sunday in October, 1849. 

20. Red Bud, Franklin county, Friday after first Sunday in 
October, 1850. 

21. Warrenton, Friday before first Sunday in October, 1851. 

22. Flat Rock, Franklin county, Friday before first Sundy in 
October, 1852. 

23. Peach Tree, Nash county, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
August, 1853. 

24. Reedy Creek, Warren county, Friday before fourth Sun- 
day in August, 1854. 



25 

25. Perry's Chapel, Franklin county, Friday before fourth Sun- 
day in August, 1855. 

26. Salem, Wilson county, Fridav before fourth Sunday in 
August, 1856. 

27. Gardner's, V/arren county, Friday before fourth Sundav in 
August, 1857. 

28. Poplar Spring, Franklin county, Friday after third Sunday 
in Augnst, 1858. 

29. Sharon, Warren county, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
August, 1859. 

30. Franklinton, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 1860, 

31. Maple Spring, Franklin county, Friday before fourth Sun- 
day in August, 1861. 

32. Brown's, Warren county, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
August, 1862. 

33. Red Bud, Franklin county, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
August, 1863. 

34. Mt. Zion, Franklin county. 

35. Hickory Chapel, Nash county, Friday before fourth Sunday 
in September, 1865. 

36. Bear Swamp, Nash county, Friday after first Sunday in 
October, 1866. 

37. Cypress Chapel, Franklin county, Friday before first Sun- 
day in October, 1867. 

38. Red Oak, Nash countv, Friday before first Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1868. 

39. Sharon, Warren county, Friday after fourth Sunday in 
October, 1869. 

40. Poplar Spring, Franklin county, Thursday before first Sun- 
day in October, 1870. 

41. Haywood's (now Corinth), Franklin county, Thursday 
before first Sunday in October, 1871. 

42. Sandy Creek, Franklin county. Thursday before first Sun- 
day, in October, 1872. 

43. Wilson, Friday before first Sunday in October, 1873. 

44. Philadelphia, Nash county, October 1-3, 1874. 

45. Reedy Creek, Warren county, Thursday before fk"st Sun- 
day in October, 1875. 

46. Henderson, September 28-30, 1876. 

47. Pleasant Grove, Nash county, October 4-6, 1877. 

48. Conoconara, Halifax, county, October 10-12, 1878. 

49. Louisburg, October 9-12, 1879. 

50. Peach Tree, Nash county, October 6-8, 1880. 

51. Antioch, Halifax county, 1881. 

52. Littleton, October 5-7, 1882. 

53. Rock Spring, Franklin county, October 11-13, 1883. 



26 

54. Mount Zion, Franklin county, October 9-11, 1884. 

55. Wilson, October 8-10, 1885. 

56. Brown's, Warren county, October 7-9, 1886. 

57. Samaria, Nash county, October 4-6, 1887. 

58. Maple Spring, Franklin county, October 11-13, 1888. 

59. Gardner's, Warren county, October 10-12, 1889. 

60. Greenville, October 9-11, 1890. 

61. Warrenton, October 8-10, 1891. 

62. Louisburg, October 5-7, 1892. 

63. Philadelphia, October 5-7, 1893. 

64. Scotland Neck, October 11-13, 1894. 

65. Wilson, October 9-11, 1895. 

66. Poplar Spring, October 7-9, 1896. 

67. Stoney Creek, October 5-7, 1897. 

68. Weldon, October 4-6, 1898. 

69. Warren Plains, October 3-5, 1899. 

70. Spring Hope, October 16-18, 1900. 

71. Corinth, October 8-10, 1901. 

72. Washington, October 6-8, 1902. 

73. Rocky Mount, October 6-8, 1903. 

74. Maple Springs, October 4-6, 1904. 

75. Tarboro, October 3-5, 1905. 

76. Red Oak, October 9-11, 1906. 

77. Henderson, October 7-9, 1907. 

78. Sandy Creek. October 27-28-29, 1908. 

79. Sharon, October 5-7, 1909. 

Rules of Decorum. 

Believing it best to be governed by certain rules and regulations 
in conducting the business of the Association, we adopt the 
following: 

1. The Association shall be opened and closed with prayer. 

2. Not more than one person shall speak at a time, who shall 
rise from his seat and address the Moderator. 

3. The person thus speaking shall not be interrupted, unless he 
violates ^ome rule of decorum. 

4. The person speaking shall adhere strictly to the subject, 
and in nowise reflect on any other brother. 

5. No brother shall absent himself from the Association 
without obtaining permission from the body. 

6. No brother shall speak more than twice on the same subject 
without unanimous consent. 

7. No person, shall whisper while a brother is speaking, 

8. The names of the delegates shall be enrolled by the Clerk, 
and called as often as the Association requires. 



27 

9. The Moderator may give his ideas on any subject before 
putting' it to the vote, but is entitled to vote only in case of a tie. 

10, An order of business shall be made at the beginning of 
each session, and shall be changed only by vote of the body. 

Constitution. 

1. The Association shall be composed of the pastors and of the 
members chosen by the churches, who shall produce letters certi- 
fying their apointment. Members thus chosen and convened, 
together with the pastors, shall be denominated The Tar River 
Baptist Association, which shall have no power over the churches, 
nor shall it infringe on any of their rights. 

2. The letters from the churches shall contain the number then 
in fellowship and those baptized, received by letter, dismissed, 
excluded and died since last Association. 

3. The officers of the Association shall be a Moderator, Clerk, 
Treasurer and Historian, who shall be chosen by the sufferages of 
the members present. 

4. Other churches, upon petition by letter and by delegates, 
and after a satisfactory examination of their Articles of Faith, 
may be admitted to the body by a unanimous vote, when the 
Moderator shall give to the delegates the right hand of fellowship. 

5. Every church in this Association is entitled to one represen- 
tative, but no church more than three. 

6. Every motion made and seconded shall be left to the discre- 
tion of the Association whether it shall be debated or not. 

7. The Association shall endeavor to furnish the churches with 
copies of its Minutes, 

8. The Minutes of the Association shall be read and approved, 
and shall be signed by the Moderator and Clerk before the Asso- 
ciation adjourns. - 

9. Any church not representing itself in this body for three 
successive sessions, by letter or delegates, shall be stricken from 
the roll of the churches, unless satisfactory reasons are assigned. 

10. The Association shall withdraw fellowship from any church 
which shall be found disorderly in faith or practice. 

11. Visiting bretheren from sister churches, or similar bodies, 
may be invited to participate in our deliberations. 

12. At each session of the Association delegates to the Baptist 
State Convention and to the Southern Baptist Convention shall be 
chosen by vote. 

13. This Constitution is subject to alteration by a majority 
vote of the delegates enrolled at any session. 

14. The business of the Association shall be conducted accord- 
ing to Mell's Parliamentary Practice. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL STATISTICS. 



CHURCHES. 



Superintendents and Post Office. 



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J. G. Faulkner, Louisburg- 



E. L. Hale, Littleton 



H. E. Rod well, Macon 

Spurgeon Sheaiin, Essex 

J. S. Royater, Henderson 

A. H. Glover, Bailey 

J. H. Massey, Spring Hope. 



Antioch ! 

Bear Swamp !_ 

Bethesda.--- S. R. Watkins, Manson 

Bethlehenj H. D. HemminKway, Rosemary. 

Browns S. L. Bobbitt, Henderson 

Carys Chapel A. H. Hoyle, Henderson 

Castalia S.J. Bartholomew, Castalia 

Cedar Rock J. B. Fulg-ham, Louisburg 

Crockers Chapel.. 

Coi'inth • 

Cypress Chapel. .- 
Enterprise ...... 

Ephesus 

Gardners 

Harris Chapel. . 
Henderson .. 

Joh ns Chapel 

Joyners Chapel . . . 

Kittrells 

Littleton ' 

Louisburg 

Macon 

Maple Sprinfs 

Marhiaduke 

Middleburg 

Midway . 

Mountain Grove.. 
Mount Herman 
Mount Hebron 

Mount Zion 

New Bethel 

New Sandy Creek 
North Henderson 

Peach Tree 

Philadelphia 

Poplar Springs !j. H. Cheaves, Sutton 

Quankie Joe Love, Rosemary 



40 45 



361 9: 20 7 

132; 12; 20--. 

12! 23 1 

12 30 --- 



52 
50 
100 12 



376: 



60 --- 
12, 67i 17 



90 12; 40 25 



100 106 1 



90 



109, 121 1 ..-_, 145 

461 56 1'. ...'.-__ 

118' 131! 1 125; 275 

50! 56i iL-.-l 50 

80| 86' 11 50 150 



12; 45! 8 



12 651 — 

12 29-- 

12 901 4 

9 40-„ 

12 801 12 



H. J. Cordle, Littleton 

Thos. P. Wilder, Louisburg. 
J. L. Coleman, Macon 



97! 106'.-! 300 90' 
133! 145, 11 400- 1501 

38; 451 l!-...! 60! 



12' 60' 5 
12; 93--- 
121 26 4 



M. C. Duke, Marmaduke--- 
R. L. Bennett, Middleburg 



B. C. Joyner, Elm City 

Junie Wilder, Castalia 

G. C. Parrish, Louisburg 

W. B. Daniel, Henderson 

R. D. Adcock, Henderson 

A. T. Barnes, Henderson 

A. H. Edwards, Spring Hope 



27 11 
64: 1; 

112--! 



---' 25! 

12' 100: 



6i 17; 3 

121 40[ 2 

12! .-: — 



48 52 1 
120 135 2; 



531 61 
124 1 136 

73 1 80 
225! 233 

85 1 92 



140: 
120' 



Red Bud- 

Reedy Creek 

Roanoke Rapids . . 

Rosemary . . . 

Rock Sprin.g 

Samaria 

Sandy Creek . . 

Sharon 

Social Plains 

South Henderson 
Sulphur Springs . 
Turkey Branch . . . 

Vaughans 

Warren ton . 

Warren Plains .. 
White Level 



Ruffin Griffin, Castalia 

W. H. Tucker, Grove Hill 

J. K. Dickens, Roanoke Rapids 



310 332 
301 34 

120 i 132 
58 1 65 



60^.150; 
'-'''256: 



12i 35 1 

8! 80' 1 
-..l--..i 3 

12| 751-- 

12 40! 2 

12! 125; 20 

9: 35: 7 



3 600 500 
1 .-....-- 
1 --.- 160 
1 ----. 50 



194 2041 1: 



555! 



J. C. Murray, Spring Hope 

G. B. West, Louisburg 

C. W. Perkinson, Wise.. 

L. J. Massey, Wakefield 

L. W. HoUowman, Henderson. 
J. A. Shepherd, Elberton 



J. G. Wright, Vaughans 

A. D. Harriss, Warren ton 

W. E. Hawks, Warren Plains 
E. D. Parrish, Louisburg 



12 3321 20 

5 35'--- 

6 45 5 
6, 35: 5 

12! 128 I 32 

...: 1--- 



isa 


202 




57 


65 




no 


120 




65 


71 




225 


235 




38 


46 





---: 238; 
.-- 210 
... 100' 
... 54 
75 200 
.-- 36 



12; 1251--- 

12 35I 1 

12' 70l 4 

12 65!--- 

12 150, 25 

12 32; 3 



60' 68: 1 ----:-.-- 

100 lU' 1 476; 298 

110, 124 1 138; 267 

120: 129 1 ---- 240! 



12 50!--- 

12 60| 2 

12! 70!--- 

6: 701 6 



376 3762 4233 44 2236 5439 



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Antioch 

Bear Swamp ... . 

Bethesda 

Bethlehem 

Brown's 

Carys Chapel 

Castalia 

Cedar Rock 

Crocker s Chapel... 

Corinth .-. ... 

Cypress Chapel 

Enterprise 

Ephesus 

Gardners 

Harriss Chapel 

Henderson 

Johns Chapel 

Joyners Chapel 

Kittrells 

Louisburg 

Macon 

Maple Springs 

Marmaduke 

Middleburg 

Midway 

Mountain Grove... 

Mt. Hebron 

Mt. Hermon 

Mt. Zion 

New Bethel 

New Sandy Greek. 
North Henderson.. 

Peach Tree 

Philadelphia. 

Poplar Springs 

Quankie 

Red Bud 

Reedy Creek 

Roanoke Papids .T.- 

Rosemary 

Rock Springs 

Samaria 

Sandy Creek 

Sharon 

Social Plains 

South Henderson.. 
Sulphur Springs.. 

Turkey Branch 

Vaughans 

Warren ton --. 


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1 en I OOi COO" OOOOC3500I OOOOOOOOOOr OOOOOi Oi Oi OOOOOOi 1 


Pastor's Salary. 








col 1 1 
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1 1^ 1 1 1 1 It 1 

1 I-'I 1 1 1 I-.1 1 Ol. 
tOi 1 1 1 tOi 1 Ol 

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iiiiiicn'ii-q lc£)cn!cn<iit)tN5iiiioi-»-:]iiii 
1 I 1 1 1 1 tf^i 1 1 O en 1 OOOi O oil 1 t 1 OCOCTIi i i i 

i i i i i i fsi i i ggi ggi gi i i 1 i gi i i i gggi i i i 


Building and 

Repairing 




isii i i Soosi i i i Hooi i K^SEs^i gi i i i i i ena>ssi ^i si &! i i si ^i i i si i i 
gggi i i gggi i i i gsi i sgggi ^i i i i i i §g§?8Si si fei si i i si si i i §i i i 


Incidentals 




toto~d' I 1 tocncni 03 00 1 1 1 1 1 - 
cnrf^oi 1 1 en 1 <30i 1 i 1 1 1 


i 1 1 l-i 1 1 1 i i 1 l-'l-'COt 1 h-" i I-'I 1 ill i 1 1 1 1 i 1 

1 t 1 Ol 1 1 1 1 1 ooooi OOi Oil ^i ^^ i *-^\ ■ i h^i i ■ i i i i 

i i ! ssi i i i i i gggi §i si gii gi si i i si i i i. i i i 


The Poor. 




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Associational 
Missions. 


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■ocni-'toi entototooii i i-'ooi cnto 

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3000I ooiocnoi 1 OO" o to 


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1 oi totoi-ii 1 1 cntoi -q 1 cni 1 Oitoeni *- 1 to i cooii cntoto i 

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1 coi coenoi t i ocoi oi Oi i en-aooi-'i i-'i em -q O i Otoocm 


State Missions. 


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1:^ 1 It 

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^l ggi si i gsi §s?ssi i ggggi gi §i si §si sgi 


Heme Missions. 


o ' H-'oo t ^^ co i i i-t to i i cc ■ oicoi ■ vi>-^ i ■ coi i co i 
cc 1 1 00 00 1-1 ^^ i>5 1 c;ioc<o-^wi ootc> h-><-^coc&i ooocch^i < ooa^)^i -qi>scci ■ tcocoi ^^l oii if>^\ ocoa^i-^i^i 

oil CnCntCOOii CO-3CnOl-*i OO' Cn-acnoor OSOOH-i I OOrfi'i 010»-" ' OiCnWh-ii *qi Oi> *».i Oi-atOOOOi 


Foreign Missions. 


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Sunday School 

Expenses. 




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Colportage. 


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to 


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Orphanage. 


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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 cni 1 1 SI 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 

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Colleges and 

Schools. 


to 


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Ministerial 

Education. 


03 

ax 


31 


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11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I-' 1 1 1 1 1 C71 111 1 I H^ 1 1 

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Old Mens Relief. 


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1 1 1 1 toopl 1 ooppl pi 1 1 enol 1 1 1 1 1 cni moI 1 mI 
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Other Objects. 


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Minute Fund. 


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to 


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gii i i i i i i i s 


1 1 1 t 1 1 1 1 1 CO 1 I-'I oil 1 1 Ol CO 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I-'I 1 1 1 

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t 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 cnem em en i i i toi co i i i i i i em oi i i i i 


Through W. H. 
M. So. H.&F. M. 


en 

2 


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i Ssi i i S 


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1 



ANNUAL 



OP THE 



TAR RIVER 



1910 

IN ITS EIGHTIETH SESSION 
HeM with the Church at New Bethel, Vance County 

October 4. 5. 6. 1910 



The next session to be held with the 
church at Samaria, Nash County, N. 
C, on Tuesday after the first Sunday 
in October, 1911, at 11 o'clock. To 
preach introductory sermon, Rev. L. 
W. Swope; alternate, E.. P. Walker. 



OFFICERS. 



Eev. G. M. Duke, Moderator, Mapleville, N. C. 

Rev. A. G. Willcox, Clerk and Treas...Brinkleyville, N. 0. 



ANNUAL 



OF THE 



TAR RIVER 



1910 

iN ITS EIGHTIETH SESSION 
Held with the Church at New Bethel, Vance County 

October 4, 5. 6. 1910 



The next session to be held with the 
church at Samaria, Nash Couaty, N. 
C, on Tuesday after the first Sunday 
in October, 1911, at 11 o'clock To 
preach introductory sermon, Rev. L. 
W. Swope; alternate, R. P. Walker, 



OFFICERS. 

Rev. G. M. Duke, Moderator, Mapleville. N. C. 

Rev. A. G. Willcox, Clerk and Treas Brinkleyville, N. (.'. 



STANDING C0:v1MITTEES. 

To write on Aged Ministers Ivey Allen. 

Orphanage G. W. May. 

Education Oscar Cruch. 

V/oman's Work J. W. Morgan. 

Periodicals W. P. Cambell. 

Sunday Schools W. H. Kimball. 

Temperance G. G. O'Neil. 

State Missions R P. Walker. 

Home Missions L. W. Swope. 

Foreign Mi?sions T. J. Taylor. 

Associationa] Missions G. M. Duke. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 



T. J. Taylor. 
T. M. Pittman. 
J. M. Gardner. 



G. W. May. 
Ivey Allen. 
A. W. Perry. 



W. B. Daniel. 
J. A. Kelly. 
G. M. Duke. 



PASTORS AND POST OFFICES. 



Bobbitt, Walter, 
Bunn, D. T., 
Bowers, W. E , 

Campbell, 

Duke, G. M., 
Hufham, J. D , 
Hocutt, J. E., 
May, G. W., 
O'Neil, G. G.. 
Reavis, Jerre, 
Sledge, J. W., 
Stradlev, J. A., 
Swope, L. V/., 
Taylor, T. J., 
Tunstall, Geo., 
Walker, R. P., 
Willcox, A. G.. 



Littleton. 

Spring Hope. 

Airlie. 

Wise. 

Mapleville. 

Franklin, Va 

Nashville. 

Castalia. 

Roanoke Rapids. 

Henderson. 

Stallings. 

Oxford. 

Louisburg. 

Warrenton. 

Manson. 

Littleton. 

Brinkleyville. 



■ New Bethel, Vance, Co. 

Oct. 4, 1910. 
The Tar River Association met with tlie church here to-day in its eigh- 
tieth annual session. Brother McStamps read the scripture; led in prayer 
and preached the introductory sermon. Text Isa. 6tli Clia^ter. Theme 
Service. 

At the close pf the sermon the Moderator called the Association to 
oi-der and the rcll of the church was called and delegates enrolled as fellows: 

Antiocii — J. R. Parker, L. I. Hamili, Paul Bosman. 

Bear £v/amf- — W. E. Bov/ors, J. W. Bowers, Jessie Coliias. 

Bethesda — J. .J. AVathins, K. T. Xorv.-ood. 

Bethlehem — Jesse Carter, C. O. King. 

Browns — Sam. Allen, J. Vv'. Smithv^ick. 
Gary's Chapel— C. E. Haynes, C. G. Stokes, W. W. Currin. 

Castalia — G. \V. filay, Frank \VheeIlss, Willis May. 

Cedar Rock— S. J. :Malthews. \ 

Crockeis Chapel — 

Corinth — J. G. Faulkner, J. B. Smitu, A. A. Deniant. 

Cyr-ress Chapel — \. A. Wilder, J. M. Eikes, T. S. Wilder. 
Enterprise — R. P. Walker. 

E^hesus — G. W. Coyizedge, W. J\I. Warren, L. M. Elwards. 

Gardners — Berry Wright. ; 

Harris Chapel — B. C. Hamlet, M. A. Sillery. 
Henderson— i 
Johns Chapel — 
Joyner's Chapel^ 
Kittrell— 

Littleton— R. P. Walker. ^ 

Louisburg — J. Allen, D. T. Smithwick, W. L. Swope. 
Macon — H. A. Nicholson. 

Maple Springs — J. W. Strange, J. H. Sledge, .1. II. Uzzle. 
Marmaduke— :\I. T. Duke, S. R. Duke, W. C. Hatchccck. 
iMiddleburg — J. L. Jackscn. ' 

Midv/ay — R. B. Bowden, W. H. Laden, Oliver, Bowdeii. 
IMountain Grove — W. D. Dorsey. 
Mt. Hebron— S. T. Gupton. 

IMt. Hermon— D. T. Bunn. ' i 

Mt. Zion— S. M. Parish, W. T. Cooper, W. A.Burnett. ' ' 

New Bethel— B. F. Stambcck, G. T. Ayscue, S. V.. Hicks, 
New Sandy Creek — T. S. West. 
North Henderson — S. G. Walters. 
Peach Tree — M. R. Sikes. 
Philadelphia— W. B. Bunting, C. P. Harper. I 



Poplar Springs— 
Quankie— J. B. Eosman. 
Red Bud — T. S. Collie. 

Reedy Creek-T. A. Harris, W. T. Robertson, B. P. Robertson. 
Roanoke Rapids— J. K. Dickens. 

RoTsprlng-Henr, Ethridge. William Ransdal, FranK Baker 
Samaria— W. B. Bergeron. 

Sandy Creek-D. N. Nelms. W. H. Grifton, ames Brewer. 
Sliaron— Jimmie Hicks, Willie White. 
Social Plains— J. W. Sledges 

South Henderson-B. B. Collins, T. C Currin, Jeri-e Reeves. 
Sulphur Springs-W. G. Wilson, A. G. Clayton, R. E. I. Aycock. 
Vaughn — J. J. ^Marshall. 
Turkey Branch — A. G. Willcox. 
Warren Plains— T. B. Weldon. 

Warrenton-T. J. Taylor, J. W. Allen, J. H. Kerr. 
White Level-L. L. Gaftcn, J. C. B artcholomey, Clifton Parnell. 
The :!^-o^ln.ent of delegates being con^pleted the ^^f^^^^^Z 
ized by the reelection of G. M. Duke Moderator and A. G. Wilcox clerk and 

^ AneTthe election the Moderator and clerk delivered brief addresses ex- 
pressing their appreciation of the honor done them. 

Visiting brothers invited to seats in body wneheupon Pi of. F. P^ tioa 

The follovdng cor^amittees announced on order of business. T. -J. Taylor, 
"pLrCo,:;„.U.erw""wa..e„, M. T. 0„.. .^ .. -.,.. T,»e, 

.Xl:Z Brother May. t.e pastor o, ..e o-^urc. extended a crd 
welcome to delegates and visitors, to whieh on request of Brother 
'"k'mmLr or'de-rrness tnade partial report alter wMe. the As- 
sociation adjourned with prayer by Brother J. J. Marshall. 

Tuesday 1:30 

The Asscciation'reassembled and after prayer by Brother Sledge proceed- 
ed to business. 

The following report on Sunday Schools was read by Brother Reeves, the 
writer being absent: 



REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

First. What is a Sunday scliool? 

It is tlie wliole cliurch at work studying the Bible. Every member of each 
cLurch should be a Sunday school scholar. As a rule the school should be 
taught at the church. If any of the membeis cannot attend on account oi' 
difctance or bodily affliction, they ought to study the lessons at home. The 
church members should bring into tlieir school their children, and their 
ucighbois. If iheie is a community in leach of tlie (.hurch that lias no 
Sabbath-school some of the church members should go there and organize a 
schccl great good has been done by gathering a few together in a school 
house or other convenient place. The Sunday school work is greatly helped 
by having troi.er accommodations for the diffeient classes sucn as separate 
class rooms, maps, charts, and ?,11 needful literature for each class. 

Second. What good does a Sunday schccl do? 

It is the best means cf increasing Bible knovvledge. The explanations of 
the lessens are adapted to the understanding of little children, j'oung people, 
and older i_e;)i.]c. Bible knowledge is the foundation of all that is good in 
this life; and on it alone can we build our hopes of heaven. The Sunday 
school gives all members something to do. Do nothing people are worth- 
less in tlie world or in the cliurch. 

The Sunday schccl, by teaching the Bible affords an excellent opportunity 
to stimulate ciiristian people to better living, and better work in the Master's 
cause. It affords also a good opportunity of leading sinners to Christ, 
iilvery Sabbatli school should be a soul wining agency. 

The Sabbath school does much good by training leople so to keep the 
Sabbath aa i,o gloiify Gcd and do good to men. 

It enables people to enjoy helpful religious priviliges, instead of sinning 
away God's day, by staying at home, or visiting neighbors, and keeping 
them from going to church, or Sabbath school. 

Third, Who ( us.'.lit to go to Sabbath school? Did people siiould go. II is 
a mistaken idea, that the Sabbath school is only for children. Old people 
need to study the Bible. They have no t learned all it teaches, no one ever 
has. Young people should go, and make the Sabbatli school a pleasant 
and profitable place, so enjoyable and helpful that they would rather 
go there than any where else. Fathers and mothers should go, take 
all their children with them. There is no place where they can get 
such good help in training their children. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. H. HAYLE. 

Brother E. L. Aliddieton delivered an able and strikingly beautiful ad- 
dress, to which Brother May added appropriate remarks. On motion of 
T. .J. Taylor a committee was appoint ed consisting of W. B. Daniel, W. H. 



6 

Kimball and L. W. Bagley to co-operate with Sunday School Board in car- 
rying out its policy, after which the report was adopted. 

Report on Ministers Relief Board was called for in the absence of the 
report addresses were made by Brothers Reeves and Sledge, and on motion 
of Brother Marshall Brother Reaves was appointed to prepare a report for 
the ministers. Afteiwaids a cash collection amounting to $ 12.4b. 

REPORT 0^^ AGED MINISTERS. 

This work of caring for the preachers who are able to work no longer 
effectively is among the most important enterprises of the denomination. 

The preacher is unlike the me.n of any other calling. The lawyer has his 
hard time in the beginning of his career. The preacher has his in the closing 
of his years. No cne of the churches that he has served or provided take 
any account of him when he can no longer serve. 

It is creditable to the Baptist of the state that for some years they have 
been giving more attention to this needed work, of caring for their aged 
ministers The Board having this wo rk in charge has been pushing it en- 
ergetically and there has been an increase In liberality. 

Between 40 end 50 of our aged brethren have received aid from the 
ftoar^i during the vear and the number will naturally increase with the 
ravM increase of the denomination. The Methodist make good provision 
tor their superannuated preachers. The Episcopalians are engaged m 
trying to raise a tund of several millions of dollars for this purpose. 

The Presbyterians of the North are similarly engaged. It becomes us 
especially to be active and liberal in the same enterprise. We commit the 
matter to the careful consideration of the churches. 

Respt. 
JERRE REEVES. 

Brother May read Report on Temperance and addresses was made by 
Brother G W. May and Ivy Allen. Re port adopted, the pastor and deacon of 
the church appointed a committee on religion. On request Brother Hob- 
good spoke on Laymen Movements. Committee on order of business made 
final report Prof. J. B. Carlisle, of Wake Forest College, and H. C. Moore, 
Editor of Recorder, were seated. Adjourned with prayer by rother Moore. 

REPORT ON' TEMPERANCE. 

We believe intemperance to be the worst evil that ever cursed any people 
We believe intemperate and malicious eating, thoughts, words, and actions, 
are prompted more by the use of ardent spirits than by any other means. 
Hence we feel that our prohibition law is doing more good than any law 
on our statute books. 



Let us do all in our power, as a great denomination to see tliat that 
law is enTorced to the letter. 

Let us vvoik to rid our great ror.ublic, of its blighting curse. 

Let us trj^ to run out the blind tiger, and place a church and school 
building where now, he has his haunts. AVhen we shall have reached that 
ideal, then indeed we will have the greatest state and republic the world 
l.as yet knoY\'n. We need a law agrnnst the Near Beer joint tor it is almost 
as bad as the salcon was, so let us urge proper legislation against this foe. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. W. May. 

• Wednesday 9:80 
The association met pursuant to adjournment and prayer service led by 
Brother Jim Sledge for half hour after which the ^Moderator called the 
assccialion to order and was led in prayer by Brother Moore. ]Minutes of the 
previous session was read and approved, 'the Moderator recognized Bro. 
L. E. M. Freeman representing Meredith Coilese. The hour for State mis- 
sions having aiiived and no report being present on motion the Moderator 
was requested to appoint a Brother to prepare report for ministers. 
Prof. J. B. Carlisle by request addressed the body on State Missions. 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIO^^S. 

The Tar River Association should take greater interest in State Missions 
nov/ than ever befcre. At the last session of the Association you decided 
to tuiu over lo t\- e State Tieaciner all the funds coiiectcd for Associationed 
Missions and let the State Board handle it, the Board agreeing that 
the missicn points within the bounds of our own association should be sup- 
plied as heretofore by the executive committee cf the Association, and the 
missionaries to be paid quarterly, the amount not to exceed the amount paid 
in by the churches of the Association. 

This plan, — considering that it is a new one, — seems to be working 
remarkably smoothly, and as soon as v^^e get accustomed to v/ill be quite 
an improvement en the old plan. 

You recognize that State Missions is at tlie foundation of all our mission 
activities, and consequently shculd receive cur ilrst and most careful con- 
sideration, and our hearty support. 

The blessings and success attending it in the past should encourage 
us to greater efforts till every nook and ccrner cf our State can hear the 
gospel and be indoctrinated in the truth. 

Your committee recommend that the churches of the Asscciation under- 
take to contribute not less tl-an Fifteen Hundred Dollars to this object dur- 
ing the next year. 

Respectfully submitted 

I. Allen. 



He was followed by Brothers ]\Iay and Duke on Association Mission. The 
roll of church, was called and the following amounts were pledged to be 
sent by the church to the next Association. 

Henderson $ 175.00 

Louisburg 150.00 

Littleton 65.00 

Roanoke Rapids 60.00 

Brown's 50.00 

New Bethel 50.00 

Warrenton 50.00 

Poplar Springs 60.00 

Maple Springs 35.00 

Samaria 35.00 

Sandy Creek 35.00 

Castalea 30.00 

Cedar Rock 30.00 

Harris 's Chapel 30.00 

Macon 30.00 

Cypress Chapel 25.00 

Red Bud 25.00 

Joyner's Chapel 25.00 

Philadelphia 25.00 

Warren Plains 25.00 

Corinth 20.00 

Gardeners 20.00 

Middleburg 20.00 

Mt. Zion 20.00 

Reedy Creek 20.00 

Gary Chapel 18.00 

Peach Tree 15.00 

Rosemary 15.00 

Enterprise 15.00 

Rock Spring 15.00 

Sulphur Springs 15.00 

Bethesda 12.00 

Vaughn 12.00 

Antioch 12.00 

Bethlehem 10.00 

Ephesus 10.00 

Marmaduke 10.00 

Midway 10.00 

Mountain Grove 10.00 

Mt Hebron 10.00 

North Henderson 10.00 



9 

Quanki 10.00 

South Henderson 10.00 

Turkey Branch 10.00 

\¥hite Level 10.00 

New Sandy Creek 6.00 

Kittrells 5.00 

Mt. Hermon 5.00 

Social Plains 5.00 



Total $1370.00 
HE PORT ON PERIODICALS. 

The religious newspaper is one of the best means of information among 
our reoile. We aie fast coming to be a reading people, and that means 
that the religious paper has a great field befde it to do service for the 
denomination and for the local church. That was what prompted the es- 
tablishment of the Biblical Recorder, and that is why it should be fostered. 

In !)li uiir Southlaud we know of no paper tluitis the equal of the Recorder. 
It li;is hMcl ;i L;l()!i()us history and tlie fuiuie is full < f promise. It has had a 
long line of nohle editois. and none has been more efficient than our present 
ciiiuti'. Rev. Hight C Moore. The paper stands for orthodoxy, the Bible and 
for every forward movement. We recommend, therefore, that every Baptist 
family in the bounds of the Tar River Association subscribe to this, our best 
periodical at once and read it. 

We also recommend the Foreign ilission Journal, the organ of the Foreign 
Mission Board published at Richmond, Va., also our Home Field, the organ 
of the Home ^Mission Board, published at Alanta Ga. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Robert P. Walker, Committee. 

Report en Periodicals called for and in absence of report Brother H. C. 
Moore Editcr of the Recorder made a thrilling address which stirred the 
hearts of the people. 

BEPOET 0> BAPTIST ORPHANAGE. 

Just twenty five years ago this fall the first Orphan was received at the 
Thomasville Baptist Orphanage. Since that time something over twelve 
hundred Orphans have been received and cared for and trained, and have 
felt the influence of the love and sympathy of the Baptist host of the Tar 
River Association and of the state, in this home provided for them by 
sacrifice and heroic effort of many who have given largely and labored long 
and patiently for the success of this much loved institution. And who can 
tell what have been the results of the training of these boys and girls, 
many of them now men and women, for the general uplift of the life, both 
civic and religious, of ,the state. 



10 

The first ten years of the life of the Orphanage were largely years of 
foundation laying, foundations on the grounds at Thomasville, and foun- 
dations for love and help in the hearts of the people. 

A big bodied, broad minded man, strong of heart and of indomitable pur- 
pose laid these foundations broad and deep. We will always delight to 
honor his memory. The Tar River Association will be true to its past 
history and will esteem it a privilege to assist in the erection of the building 
for the Orphanage Church to be known as the J. H. ■Mills Alsmorial Church. 

Under another master spirit, the second ten years were largely years of 
develcpement: 

Rev. J. B. Eoone onoe said to the v.-riter, in speaking of his going to the 
Orphange as general manager, tha+ all his life he had beon called <o take 
held of enterprises under hard conaiticns. And the results of his work a\ 
Statesville, Salisbury, Chai'otte, Henderson ville and Thomasville show that 
he took hold with a firm hand directed by a clear head, prompted by a pure 
heart. He was a long way ahead of all of us in his conception of the 
scope and reach of the orphanage wo rk, and we are just now coming to 
a fulfilling of his hopes and plans. 

During the five years just past while development has and still is going 
on grandly, there has developed still another spirit, A spirit of perfecting, — 
perfecting the grounds, perfecting the equipment, and sending out from 
the institution a more nearly finished product in the men and women who 
leave it. And who will dare say that the Trustees were not Divinely 
guided in selecting the man who as general manager has brought this 
to pass. 

For fifteen years the scarcity of funds and the insistant and ever 
increasing demand for the admission of children, made the providing 
of food, clothing, and shelter, and the giving of the barest rudiments 
of education about all that could be undertaken. Since that time a 
more liberal provision has been made for these things, and the present 
management has been enabled to give a little attention to the beauti- 
fying of the grounds, adding to the comforts of the children and 
extending the course of study and increasing the scope of the school 
work till the General Manager is coming to believe that his hope of 
being able to bring the school to the standard of at least the average 
high school of the country, and of sending out young men and 
women equipped for the usual avocations of life, with hearts trained 
to purpose, brains trained to direct, and hands trained to execute. 

There are at present about four hundred children at the Orphanage, 
and in spite of the high cost of living and the improvements men- 
tioned above, the institution is so economically administerd that the 
whole cost of food, clothing, and schooling for each child has been a 
little less than seven dollars a month for the past, year. I doubt if any 



11 

Vy-tore clee does the denomiuation get such glorious returns for the 
money ex^^jended. 

Some of the i resent needs of the institution, as indicated above 
are, an adequate church building, a building for manual training, and 
as ever, more roan) for the reception of Orphans still knocking for 
admission. 

Respectfully submitted, 

I. ALLEN. 

Repcit 07.1 Orphanage was read by Brother Ivey Allen, and Brother 
Arch Johnson talked, as but few rnen can talk on the orphanage. 

A collection was taken for the orphanage, amounting to $27.00; 
alter which the report was adopted, after which Association adjourned for 
dinner. Prayer by Brotiier Swope. 

WEDNESDAY, 2 O' CLOCK. 

Association met and was led in prayer by Brother Cullen. The sub- 
ject of eduLa,ticn being under consideration; Dr. Freeman representing 
Meredith College, and Dr. Cullen representing Wake Forest College, and 
the Board of Education, and O. L. Stringfield representing the Eottthern 
Baptist Theological Seminary delivered able and instructive addresses. 

Committees on New Churches reported as follows: Junior Committee 
on New Churches recommend that on the endorsement of Brethren Jerre 
Reeves and W. B. Daniel, members of the Constituting Council, and the 
understanding that the articles of faith and covenant be present at the next 
.session of the Advance Baptist Church be received into our Association. 

T. J. TAYLOR, 
J. W. SLEDGE. 
J. J. MARSHALL, 

Motion prevailed — 

On motion of Brother Sledge, the Moderator was instructed to appoint 
a committee to collect funds and have an iron fence around the grave of 
our late Brother Webb, and the grave suitably marked by a stone. 

Resolved, That this Association require the Executive Committee to 
meet every three mouths, and that the committee select its place of 
meeting. 

G. W. MAY. 

Committee on Place and Preacher, report Samaria as the place, and 
L. W. Swope as the preacher, and R. P. Walker as alternate. On motion, 
the Association unanimously resolved to meet on Tuesday after first Sun- 
day in October, 1911, at eleven o'clock. 



12 

Brother Ivey Allen, Treasurer of Executive Committee, offered his 
report, which, after being audited, was adopted. 

IVY ALLEN, Treasurer. 
IN ACCOUNT WITH THE TAE KIY EK ASSOCIATION. 

1909. 

Oct. 7 To balance on hand $ 599 55 

21 By amount paid Rev. G. G. O'Neill, 

Roanoke Rapids 25 00 

21 By amount paid Kittrell Church 2 00 00 

Nov. 11 By amount paid Rev. Jerre Reeves, 

Henderson 25 00 

25 By amount paid Rev. G. G. O'Neill, , \ 

Roanoke Rapids 2 5 00 

27 By amount paid Rev. A. G. Willcox, \ 

Alsop's Chapel 16 00 ' 

Dec. 11 By amount paid Rev. .lerre Reeves, . ' 

Henderson 2 5 00 ' 

15 By amount paid Rev. G. G. O'Neill, ■ 

Roanoke Rapids 3 7 50 

21 By amount paid Rev. D. T. Bunn, Mt. ! 

Hermon 1875 

22 By amount paid Rev. Jerre Reeves, i 

Henderson 25 00 , 

1910. i 

Mch. 25 By amount paid Rev. G. T. Tunstall, 

Norlina, 3 33 

April 8 By amount paid Rev. A. G. Wilcox, 

Vicksburg and Minute Fund 19 8 3 

$ 420 4^ 

Balance on hand, October, 4, 1910 $ 179 14 

Audited and approved, 

W. M. BOOM, 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

Obeying the command of our blessed Lord, the churches of the Tar 
River Association are engaged in the great work of evangelizing the 
world. 

Beginning at home we are endeavoring to preach the gospel in all 
nations, and to every national human being. 



13 

It is our r'-^is'pose to go forward, and in this great work, and not relax our 
efforts until nil the people of the earth have the opportunity of hearing 
the gospel. 

In the prosecution of this work, our Southern Baptist Churches con- 
tributed during the past yecr 8501,058,00, and we have on the field 
246 missionaries, 4G7 native helpers, a total of 713 workers. We now 
have on the foreign field, in the way of results shows 2S9 churches with 
539 out-stations with a nien:bership of 19,239, We have 207 houses of 
v/orship and 3 IS Sunday-Schools with 11,156 scholars. There are 142 
day schools with 3,771 pupils; 11 Boys' Boarding Schools with 721 
students; 12 Girls' Boarding Schools with 610 students, and 2 colleges 
with 134 students. Note especially that there are 8 "Women's Training 
schools v^rith 179 students, and 8 Theological Training Schools with 
about 2)0 students. What a power tliese trained men and women will 
be in the work I 

And still the Master says. "Go ye," and with full purpose of heart we 
answer Master, we will go forwa,rd. 

In pushing this work, let every pastor and member inform him- 
self and others, subscribe for the Foreign Mission Journal, and read it — 
give to this great cause and pray for it. Let us undertake to give 
$1,500 to Foreign Missions during the ensuing Asociational year. 

T. J. TAYLOR. 

After announcements the Association adjourned, witli prayer by Brother 
Hufham. 

At night. Brother O. L. Stringfield preached a most helpful sermon. 

THURSDAY, 9:30. 

The Association, upon reassembling, was led in a most helpful praise 
service, by Brother Coppedge. Minutes of previous session read, and 
approved. Delegates to Baptist State Convention appointed as follows: 
G. M. Duke, A. G. Willcox, J. D. Hufham, R. P. Walker, G. W. Coppedge, 
J. W. Sledge. 

IVY ALLEN, Treasurer. 

Brother Taylor offered his report on Foreign Mission, wliich was unani- 
mously adopted. 

To Southern Baptist Convention — Rev. T. J. Taylor, 

On motion of Brother Taylor, Brethren Hufham and Duke were con- 
tinued to complete history of Tar River Association, and the Executive 
Committee be instructed to devise means for paying the same. 



14 

Report oil Home Missions read by Brother Reeves, who followed the 
report with a most instructive address, after which the report was 
adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON HOME MISSIONS. 

From the very beginning of the Southern Baptist Convention, the work 
of Home Missions has engaged a large share of the attention of the body, 
and of the Baptist of the South and Southwest. The greatness of the 
lesults cannot be knovv'n or estimated on earth. 

They have been ecpecially great in North Carolina. The strong and 
nourishing churches in Raleigh, Greensboro, Yv'ilrcington, Charlotte, and 
other strong and important points in the State, were aided by the board 
in the days of their weakness. 

The board is still prcsecuting this work, of building up the Baptist 
course in the State and especially in the mountain region in the West. 
Not only in North Carolina, but in all the States of the Southern Baptist 
Convention, and in Cuba. 

The board is working and planning with ceaseless energy and with 
liberality. For particulars, we refer your body to the minutes of the last 
meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention, or our own State Convention, 

Respectfully. 

Committee. 

Report en Woman's Work was read by Brother Reeves for Brother 
Hufham, and after remarks the following resolution was adopted. 

Resolved, That a brief account of the late meeting of the W, M. U. of 
this Association be published in our Jlinutes. 

Alter which the report and the resolution was adopted. 

REPORT OX AVOMAXS' WORK- 

The baptist women of the Association have been pushing their v/ork 
with highly commendable energy during the year. 

Miss Sallie Allen, the Vice-President of the Womans' Missionary Union 
of this Association, has worked efficiently and persistently, and has had 
gratifying co-operation of the women of the churches of our Association. 
There has been an increase in the number of Missionary Societies and in 
the amount of contributions to every department of our work. We record 
this fact with devout thankfulness and pray that the same spirit may pre- 
vail in even larger measure during the year, which lies before them. 

Respectfully, 

Committee. 



The W. M. U. Auxiliary of the' Tar River Association held its sixth 
annual seitlon %Yith the church at Macon, September 29, 30. Twenty-two 
of the thiity-three organizations in the Union were represented. The 
reports showed spiritual growth and development and $627.23 was 
reported for missions. 

We take as our financial aim for the coming year $7 81.00. 

The following plan of woik was adopted for the next year: 

1st. To contribute one-tenth of our means to the Lord's work. 

2nd. To endeavor by earnest, persistent, prayerful effort to secure 
as many new members as possible. 

Srd. To do moie peisonal work for the Master in our own churches. 

4th. To organize mission study classes and pursue at least one cause 
of n ission study during the year. 

5th. To seek to send at least one member from each society to the 
Conference for Mission Workers of the Elizabeth City Division. 

6th. To place a large number of mission calendar's of prayer in our 
Association, and pray earnestly for the cause or worker therein suggested 
for each day In the year. 

To the accomplishment of these ends, we earnestly request the hearty 
co-operation and support of the Tar River Association. 

Respectfully submitted, 

(Miss) SALLIE ALLEN, 

Vice-President W. M. U. 

The following resolution was unanimously adopted: 

Resolved, That we commend to the churches of this Association the 
effort to build a Baptist Meeting House, at Kittrell. 

Brother Taylor offered the following resolution, which was unani- 
mously adopted: 

Resolved, That the clerk have one thousand copies of the Jlinutes pub- 
lished, that he receive the usual compensation for his service, that he 
draw on the Treasurer of the Executive Committee for the balance needed 
to defray expenses of publication, and that we congratulate the clerk on 
the great improvement indicated in the last edition of the IMinutes. 

The following brethren were appointed as fraternal messengers to 
Roanoke Association: J. D. Hufham, G. M. Duke, and A. G. Willcox. 

Brother .John Sledge appointed to secure funds for an iron fence around 
grave of our late Brother Webb, made statement and received $10.38 for 
same. 

FINAINTE C03IMITTEE EEPOKT. 

We, your Committee on Finance, beg to report that we have received 
for — 

Associational Missions $ 469 s;; 

State Missions : ^>.J 6G 



16 



Home Missions 

Foreign Missions 

Education . . . 

A^ivd ministers 

i;rphanage 

Minutes fund 

Farmwell chui'ch . . . . 

Kittrell church 

Sunday-school Missions 
Other objects 



G 


.><:! 


G 





12 


42 


2 


CO 


L9 


1 5 


-5 6 


C'^ 


14 


5 


f) 


00 


3 


50 


4 


35 


5 62 2 


06 


1? 


05 



Excess 

I 6^4 11 
Respectfully submitted, 

W. M. WARREN, 
M. T. DUKE, 
A. A. DEMENT. 

Treasurer of Association offered his rerort with Auditors, which was 
adopted. 

TAll lUVER ASSOCIATION, 
fn act with A. G. Willcox, Tr. 

Oct., 1909. 

Received of Finance Committee for Associational Missions.. $ 905 13 

Received of Finance Committee, for State Missions 7 97 

Received of Finance Committee for Foreign Missions 16 45 

Received of Finance Committee, for Home iMissions 2 02 

Received of Finance Committee, for Minute fund 6679 

Received of Finance Committee for Orphanage 14 68 

Received of Finance Committee for aged ministers 12 08 

Received of Finance Committee for ministerial education 3 31 

Cash collection for aged ministers 11 14 

Cash collection for Orphanage 16 75 

Cash, Ivey Allen for Minutes 12 50 



Total $ 1,068 8 8 

Less .$15.73 shortage from Finance Committee 15 73 



$ 1,053 15 
DISBURSEMENTS. 

By amount paid Walton Durham for Associational Missions. . .$ 879 OS 

By amount paid V/alton Durham for State Missions 7 79 



17 

By amount paid Walton Durham for Foreign Missions 16 45 

By amount paid Walton Durham for Home Missions 2 02 

By ainount paid Walton Durham, aged ministers 12 08 

Cash collection, aged ministers 11 14 

Cash, ministerial education ?> 31 

Paid S. H. Averett, orphanage 14 68 

S. H. Averett, orphanage, cash collection 16 75 

J. C. Hardy, printing minutes • • SO 00 

Clerks fee 25 00 

Stationery, stamp, mailing, manuscript, etc 2 00 

Enrollments cards 1 00 

To amount, W. L. Johnson $ 1,041 30 

Balance due Association 11 85 



5 1,053 15 
Respectfully submitted, 

A. G. WILLCOX, Treas. 

Audited and found correct. 

W. M. BOON. 

Resolution by Brother Hufham, which was most heartily endorsed. 

Hospitality is one of the Christian graces to which we are largely in- 
debted for the pleasures of living on the earth, and this grace has always 
existed in vigor and beauty in the churches of the Tar River Association. 
It has done much to make the annual sessions of the body such delightful 
gatherings. In all the eighty years of our history no session of the body 
has been treated with more of this heavenly spirit. Therefore, 

Resolved, That the thanks of this body are due and are hereby tendered 
to the pastor and members of this church, and also to the members of 
other denominations, and to the people who are not members of any 
churches for the cordial and thoughtful courtesy, which has made our 
stay amcn~ them so delightful. For God's blessings on them we will ever 
pray. 

After one of the most delightfully, pleasant and profitable sessions 
in all the history of our body the hour for adjournment arrived. "God 
be with you till we meet again," was sung, the parting hand was taken, 
and the Moderator declared the Association adjourned to meet with the 
Church at Samaria, Nash county, on Tuesday after the first Sunday In 
October, 1911. Benediction by the Moderator. 

G. M. DUKE, Moderator. 

A. G. WILLCOX, Clerk & Treasurer. 



18 

- TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION- 

Time and Places of Meetings, 

1. Sandy Creek, Franklin county, commencing on fourth Sunday in 
October, IS 31. 

2. Maple Springs, Franklin county, commencing on Thursday before 
four Sunday in October, . 1832. 

3. Hickory Chapel, Nash county, Thursday btfore fourth Sunday in 
October, 1863. 

4. Brown's, Warren county, Saturday before fourth Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1834. 

,'. Red Bud, Franklin county, Friday before fourili S-^unrlay in Octo- 
ber, 18 3.5. 

G. Shiloh, Franklin county, 23-25th of October, ]S?>*^. 

7. Peace Tree, Nash county, Saturday before fourth Sunday m Octo- 
ber. 1837. 

5. Reedy Creek, Warren county, Friday before fourth Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1838. 

f). Flat Reck, Franklin county, Saturday before fourth Sunday in 
October, 1839. 

10 Bear Sv/amp, Halifax county, Saturday before tourtii Sunday in 
October, 1840. 

11. Louisburg, Saturday before first Sunday in October, 1841. 

12. Gardner's, Warren county, October, ;S42. 

13. Poplar Springs, Franklin county, Friday before first Sunday in 
October, 18 43. 

14. Brown's, Warren county, Saturday before first Sunday :u October, 
1S45. 

. Maple Springs, Franklin county, Saturday before first Sunday in Oc- 
tober, 1845. 

16. Sandy Creek, Franklin county, 21r,h October, 1S46. 

17. Enon, Warren county, Friday before first Sunday in October, 
1847. 

18. Hickory, Nash county, Friday before first Sunday in October, 1848. 

19. Haywood's (now Corinth), Franklin county, Friday before first 
Sunday in October, 1849. 

20. Red Bud, Franklin county, Friday after first Sunday in October, 
1850. 

21. Warrenton, Friday before first Sunday in October, 1851. 

22. Flat Rock, Franklin county, Friday before first Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1852. 

23. Peach Tree, Nash county, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 
1853. 

24. Reedy Creek, Warren county, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
August, 1854. 



19 

25. Perry's Chapel, Franklin county, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
August, 1855. 

2 6. Salem, Wilson county, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 
1856. 

2 7. Gardner's, Warren county, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 
1857. 

2 8. Poplar Spring, Franklin county, Friday after third Sunday in 
August, 185 8. 

2 9. Sharon, Warren county, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 
1859. 

30. Franklinton, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 1860. 

31. Maple Spring, Franklin county, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
August, 1S81. 

32. Bro^yn's, Warren county, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 
1862. 

33. Red Bud, Franklin county, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 
1863. 

34. Mt. Zion, Franklin county. 

35. Hickory Cl^apel, Nash county, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
September, 1865. 

3 6. Bear Swamp, Nash county, Friday after first Sunday in October, 
1866. 

37 Cypress Chapel, Franklin county, Friday before first Sunday in 
October, 1867. 

38. Red Oak, Nash county, Friday before first Sunday in October, 
1868. 

3 9. Sharon, Warren county, Friday after fourth Sunday in October, 
18G9. 

40. Poplar Spring, Franklin county, Thursday before first Sunday in 
October, 1870. 

41. Haywood's (now Corinth), Franklin county, Thursday before first 
Sunday in October, 1871. 

42. Sandy Creek, Franklin county. Thursday before first Sunday, in 
October, 1872. 

43. Wilson, Friday before first Sunday in October, 1873. 

44. Philadelphia, Nash county, October 1-3, 1S7 4. 

45. Reedy Creek, Warren county, Thursday before first Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1875. 

4 6. Henderson, September 2 8-30, 187 6. 

47. Pleasant Grove, Nash county, October 4-6, 1877. 

48. Conoconara, Halifax county, October 10-12, 1878 

49. Louisburg, October 9-12, 1879. ] 

5 0. Peach Tree, Nash county, October 6-8, 1880 

51. Antioch, Halifax county, 1881. ; - 

52. Littleton, October 5-7, 1882. 



20 

53. Rock Spring, Franklin county, October 11-13, 1SS3. | 

54. Mount Zion, Franklin county, October 9-11, 1884. 

55. Wilson, October 8-10, 1885. 

56. Brown's, Warren county, October 7-9, 1886. 

57. Samaria, Nash county, October 4-6, 1887. 

58. Maple Spring, Franklin county, October 11-13, 1888. 
5 9. Gardner's, Warren county, October 10-12, 18 89. 

60. Greenville, October 9-11, 1890. 

61. Warrenton, October S-lO, 1891, - - ^ 

62. Louisburg, October 5-7, 1892. 

63. Philadelphia, October 5-7, 1893. 

64. Scotland Neck, October 11-13, 1894. 

65. Wilson, October 9-11, 1895. ^ 

66. Poplar Spring, October 7-9, 1896. ' i 

67. Stoney Creek, October 5-7, 1897. ■ ' , j 

68. Weldon, October 4-6, 1898. 

69. Warren Plains, October 3-5, 1899. • ' 

70. Spring Hope, October 16-18, 1900. ' •' ! '; '^'^^ 

71. Corinth, October 8-10, 1901. ' " ' ' 

72. Washington, October 6-8, 1902. ' 

73. Rocky Mount, October 6-8, 1903. ■ : ,' ] 

74. Maple Springs, October 4-6, 1904. 

75. Tarboro, October 3-5, 1905. : ' ' ' . 1 

76. Red Oak, October 9-11, 1906. M 

77. Henderson, October 7-9, 1907. 

78. Sandy Creek, October 27-28-29, 1908. ■ ■ } 

79. Sharon, October 5-7, 1909. 

SO. New Bethel, October 4-5-6, 1910. 

I 

RULES OF DECORUM, 

Believing it best to be governed by certain rules and regulations in con- 
ducting the business of the Asociation, we adopt the following: 

1. The Association shall be opened and closed with prayer. 

2. Not more than one person shall speak at a time, who shall rise 
from his seat and address the Moderator. 

3. The person thus speaking shall not be interrupted, unless he violates 
some rule of decorum. 

4. The person speaking shall adhere strictly to the subject, and in 
nowise reflect on any other brother. 

5. No brother shall absent himself from the Association without obtain- 
ing permission from the body. 

6. No brother shall speak more than twice on the same subject with- 
out unanimous consent. 

7. No person, shall whisper while a brother is speaking. 



21 

S. The names of the delegates shall be enrolled by the Clerk, and 
called as often as the Association requires. 

9. The Moderator may give his ideas on any subject before putting it 
to the vote, but is entitled to vote only in case of a tie. 

10. An order of business shall be made at the beginning of each session, 
and shall be changed only by vote of the body. 

CONSTITUTION. 

1. The Association shall be composed of the pastors and of the mem- 
bers chosen by the churches, who shal Iproduce letters certifying their 
appointment. Members thus chosen and convened, together with the 
pastors, shall be denominated The Tar River Baptist Association, which 
shall have no power over the churches, nor shall it infringe on any of 
their rights. 

2. The letters from the churches shall contain the number then in 
fellowship and those baptized, received by letter, dismissed, excluded 
and died since last Association. 

3. The officers of the Association shall be a Moderator, Clerk, Treasurer 
and Historian, who shall be chosen by the sufferages of the members 
present. 

4. Other churches, upon petition by letter and by delegates, and after 
a satisfactory examination of their Articles of Faith, may be admitted to 
the body by a unanimous vote, when the Moderator shall give to the 
delegates the right hand of fellowship. 

5. Every church in fhis Association is entitled to one representative, 
but no church more than three. 

6. Every motion made and seconded shall be left to the discretion of 
the Association whether it shall be debated or not. 

7. The Association shall endeavor to furnish the churches with copies 
of its Minutes. 

S. The Minutes of the Association shall be read and approved, and 
shall be signed by the Moderator and Clerk before the Association 
adjourns. 

9. Any church not representing itself in this body for three succes- 
sive sessions, by letter or delegates, shall be stricken from the roll of 
the churches, unless satisfactory reasons are assigned. 

10. The Association shall withdraw fellowship from any church which 
shall be found disorderly in faith or practice. 

11. Visiting brethren from sister churches, or similar bodies, may be 
invited to participate in our deliberations. 

12. At each session of the Association delegates to the Baptist State 
Convention and to the Southern Baptist Convention shall be chosen by 
vote. 



22 

13. This Constitution is subject to alteration by a majority vote of the 
delegates enrolled at any session. 

14. The business of the Association shall be conducted according to 
Mali's Parliamentary Practice. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL STATISTICS. 



Churches. 



Superintendents and Postoffice. 



■^ ! d |W 



■B --E- 



■Ml 



01 a 



'a^i^ 



Advance 

Antioch 

BearSwamp 

Bethesda 

Bethlehem 

Browns 

Gary Chapel 

Castalia 

Cedar Rock 

Corinth 

Cypress Chapel.. 

Enterprise 

Ephesus 

Gardners 

Harris Chapel.... 

Henderson 

John Chapel 

Joyners Chapel.. 

Kittrells 

Littleton 

Louisburg- 

Macon 

Maple Ppring-s.... 

Marmaduke 

Middleburg 

Midway 

MountainGrove . 

Mt. Hebron 

Mt. Herman 

Mt. Zion 

New Bethel 

New Sandy C'k.. 
No. Henderson.. 

Peach Tree 

Philadelphia 

Poplar Springs.. 

Ouankie 

R2d Bud 

Reedy ■ reek 

RoanokeRapids. 

Rock Springs 

Rosemary 

Samaria 

Sandy Ci'eek 

Sharon 

Social Plains 

So. Henderson... 
Sulphur Spgs.... 

Vaughan 

Turkey Bianch. 
Warren Plains... 

Warren ton 

White Level 



G. C. Nevill. Heathsville 

.J. W. Bowers, Littleton 

R. S. Watkins, Manson ., 

C. D. Hemmings, Rosemary.. 

3. L. Bobbitt, Manson 

A. H. Hoyle, Henderson 



J. B. Fulghum. Louisburg 

J G Falkner, Louisburg 

E. Wilder, Spring Hope 

E. L Hale, Littleton 

W. M. Warren, Spring Hope. 

J. J. Nicholson. Macon 

J. R. WoUett, Terrapin 

A. T. Barnes, Henderson 



Ed. Young, KiLtrells 

.J. A. Cree, Littleton 

Geo. H. Cooper, Louisburg 

3. L. Coleman, Macnn 

J. W. Strange. Mapleville 

M. T. Duke. Marm,;!duke 

R. L. Bennett, Middleburg 

W. H. Stalhngs, Spring Hope.. 

Miss Annie Alert... 

Geo W. Giiffin, Castalia 

B. C. Joyner. Elm City 

G. C. Parrish. Louisburg 

W. B. Daniel. Henderson 

D. R. West. Hender.=on 

IS. G. Watkins. Hendeison 

P. T. Sykes, Spring Hope..' 



: 132 

100 1 46 

i 49 

I 40 

i 51 

I 100 



12' 30 

12 j 25 

6i 25 

12 21 

12 ^ 35 



125j 137 1: 

75 83 2 

98! in.5 1, 

75! 79 Ij 

40; 45 11 

1C9 119 1 

30! 35 ll 

264 280! li 



1540 
2C0: 



I 50! 12 

100; 50| 4 
i 150 12 

lOl 42' 9 

100 j 275 1 10 



40 
75 83 
lOOi 113 



J. H. Cheavis. Sutton 

Frank Cobb, Weldon 

Ruffin Griffin. Castalia 

JC. N. Hardy. W. T. Robertson. Inez.. 

!.J. K. Dickens, Roanoke Rapids 

Chas. H..Wheeliss, Louisburg 



1 
1 

! ' 1 

70l 77 1 
20i 24 1 
651 75 2 
liol 118 1 
45^ 52 1 
67l 74 1 
47! 52 ... 
581 67, 1 
127 1 
30 ... 
230 1 
118 ... 



1251 179^ 
400' 150, 

' 45! 

200 100, 

18, 

85! 



....I 40: 
....; 65i 
40! 901 



J. C. Murray, Spring Hope. 
!A. J. Joyner, Louisburg .... 



ij. M. Brantley, Wakefield 6 

L. W. Holloman. Henderson ! 10 

J. A. Shepherd. Elberon ! 8 

J. G. Wright, Vaughan '• 7 

Gunney Browning, Enfield i 5 

W. E. Hawks, Warren Plains i 14 

A. D. Harriss, Warrenton j 10 

D. B. Pearce, Castalia 1 7 



230 
105 
60 
293 

17 
90 

75 i 87 2 
187 [ 197 1 
83! 89 1 



318 31 
23 ll 
96 1 



; 250! 

, 6! 

i 150, 

300! 3241 



120' 
75! 

363 
91' 



12 127. 
12, 50 



45! 49; 

100 1 110' 

112! 1221 

40' 461 

215I 225 

42| 50 

64 71 1 

25! 30! 1' 

125! 139L..i 

138! 148|...! 

lis! 1201 1 



42, 
200, 



12, 42 
9 75 



250 1 125] 12 
I 120 12 

! I 12 

I j 6 

12 



138! 211 

1 476 

250 



Total 1 1 385' 3987 43S1 



186316400 



12 1 701 



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12 


238 


3 


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12 


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6 


45 





51 


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6 


100 


6 


34 


1 


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70 


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MINUTES 



OF THK 



Tar River Association 

19 11 



i 



IN ITS EIGHTY-FIRST SESSION g 

HELD WITH SAMARIA CHURCH i 

XASH COUNTY 



OCTOBER 3rd AND 4th, 1911. 



M 



fhe next session to be held with the church 
at Red Bud, Franklin county, on Tuesday 
after the first Sunday in October, 1912. To 
preach introductory sermon, Rev. G. M. 
Duke; alternate. Rev. T. J. Taylor. :: :: :: 



Sii 



iT^ 



OFFICERS: M 

Rev. G. M. Duke, Moderator Mapleville, N. C. 1M 

Rev. A. G. Willcox, Clerk and Treasurer Brinkleyville, N. C. Wr% 



mi 









WA^mmm 



Ml N UTES 

OF THE 

Tar River Association 

19 11 

IN ITS EIGHTY-FIRST SESSION 

HELD WITH SAMARIA CHURCH 

NASH COUNTY 
OCTOBER 3rd and 4th, t911. 

The next session to be held with the church 
at Red Bud, Franklin county, on Tuesday 
after the first Sunday in October, 1912. To 
preach introductory sermon, Rev. G. M. 
Duke; alternate, Rev. T. J. Taylor. :: :: :: 

OFFICERS: 

Rev. G. M. Duke, Moderator Mapleville, N. C. 

Rev. A. G. Willcox, Clerk and Treasurer Brinkleyville, N. C. 



ORDER OF BUSINESS OF THE SESSION OF 1912. 

TUESDAY A. M. 

11:00. Introductoiy sermon, org-anization and appointment of 

Committees. 
12:30. Adjourn for dinner. 

TUESDAY P. M. 

1:30. Sunday- Schools. 

2:00. Temperance. 

2:30. Orphanage. 

3:15. Ag-ed Ministers. 

3: -±5. Miscellaneous Business. 

1:00. Adjourn meut. 

WEDNESDAY A. W. 

9:00. Prayer Meeting". 

9:30. Woman's Work. 

10:00 Periodicals. 

10:30 to 12 Associational ?-Iis8ions. 

12:00 Adjournment for Dinner. 

WEDNESDAY P. M. 

1:30. State Missions. 

2:15. Home Missions. 

3:00. Foreig-n Missions. 

3:45. Miscellaneous Business. 

4:00. Adjournment. 

THURSDAY A. M 

9:00. Prayer Service. 

9:30. Miscellaneous Business. 

10:00 Education. 

10:45 Miscellaneous Business and Adjournment. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Aged Ministers H. A. Nicholson. 

Orphanag-e W. E. Bowers. 

F:ducation G. W. May. 

Woman's "Work J. H. Spaulding^. 

Periodicals R. P. Walker. 

Sundaj^ Schools Vf. H. Kimball. 

Temperance __.__-A, G. Wilcox. 

State Missions W. K. Hogati. 

Home Missions Ivey Allen. 

Foreig"n Missions Edvvard Allec. 

Associatioi- --G. M. Duke. 

9 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 



T. J. Taylor. Ivey Allen. G. W. May. 

G. M. Duke. T. M. Pittman. J. M. Gardner. 

PASTORS AND POST OFFICES. 



Bobbitt, N. W. 
Bilbro, W. L. 
Bunn, D. T. 
Coppege, G. W. 
Duke, G. M. 
Ellis, Jack. 
Hog-an, K. W. 
Hartsell, Wallace. 
Hocutt, J. E. 
Holmes, G. W. 
May, G. W. 
Morg-an, J. W. 
Mustian, A. P. 
Nelson, E. R. 
O'Neill, G. G. 
Putnam. D. F. 
Sledg-e, J. W. 
Stainps, Mack. 
Swope, L. W. 
Spaulding-, J. H. 
Tavlor, T. J. 
Tunstall, Geo. 
Walker, R. P. 
Willcox, A. G. 



Littleton. 

Middlesex. 

Spring" Hope. 

Henderson. 

Mapleville, 

Wake Forest. 

Norlina. 

Wake Forest. 

Nashville. 

Henderson. 

Castalia. 

Henderson. 

Warrenton. 

Kittrell. 

Roanoke Rapids. 

Spring- Hope. 

Stalling^s. 

Louisburg-. 

Louisburg-. 

Henderson. 

Warrenton. 

Manson. 

Littleton. 

Willcox. 



Samaria, Nash county, Oct. 3rd, 1911. 
The Tar River Association met with the church here today 
in its eighty-first Annual Session. By special appointment Rev. 
L. W. Swope of Louisburg- preached the Introductory Sermon from 
the following- texts, Rom. 14th chapter, 8 and 9 verses, Phillip- 
pians 1st chapter and 21st verse, and I Cor- 2ud chapter and 20th 
verse. The roll of the churches was called and the following del- 
egates responded: 

Advance — W. D. Woodlief. 

Antiocb—J. H. Lewis, L. J. Hamill. Mans Parker. 

Bear Swamp— ^. W. Bowers, W. R. Bowers. 

Bethesda — By letter. 

Bethlehem — By letter. 

Broirns — By letter. 

Carey Chapel— S. H. Currin. 

Castalia—G. W. Maj', O. Creech S. J. Bartholomew. 

Cedar Bock— J. W. Sledge. 

Corinth — Albert A. Dement. 

Crpress Chapel— H. W. Wilder, C. >I. Stallings. 

Ea terprise. 

Ephesus—\y. H. Abernath}^ L. M. Edwards, W. M. Warren. 

Gardners — By letter. 

Harris Chapel— A. P. Mustian, J. T. Parker. 

Henderson. 

Johns Chapel. 

Joyners Chapel—^. F. Pearce. 

Kittrell—E. R. Nelson. 

Littleton—^. P. Walker. 

Louisburg- ~l\^ey Allen, D. T. Smithwick. 

Macon — H. A. Nicholson. 

Maple Sprino-s—G. M. Duke. 

Marmaduke. 

Middleburs—R. L- Bennett, W. H. Kimball. 

Midway — R. D. Bo?v-den. 

Mountain Grove. 

Mt. Hebron. 

Mt. Hermon. 

Mt. Zion—W. A. Burnett, W. T. Johnson. 

A^eiT' Bethel. 

New Sandy Creek — G. W. Coppedge. 

North Henderson — J. H. Spaulding. 

reach Tree— A. H. Kdwards, J. H. Griffin W. H. Delbridge. 

Ph ilci delph ia . 

Poplar Sprin£S—B. R. Perry, K. M. Mullen, J. M. White. 

Queinkie — J. B. Bosnian. 



ieed Bud—T. S. Collie. 

Reedy Creek — B. W. Harris. 

Roanoke Rapids. 

Rosemary. 

Rock Spring—^!. T. Howell, C. T, Cheaves, Ricks Harris. 

Samaria—]. M. Strickland, J. G. Bryant, A. R. Griffin. 

Sandy Creek — P. J. Brewer. 

Sharon, 

Social Plains — Bythan Brantley, H. B. Hagwood, W. B. 
Brantley. 

South Henderson — B. B. Collins. 

Sulphur Spring^s — Wayne Aycock, Harry Limer. 

Vaughan — B. O. Reggan, J. J. Marshall. 

Turkey Branch — A. G. Willcox. 

Warren Plains — By letter. 

Warrenton~T. J. Taylor. 

White Level 

After the enrollment of delegates the Association proceeded 
to complete its organization by the reelection of G. M Duke Mod- 
erator and A. G. Willcox Clerk and Treasurer. These brethren 
made brief addresses expressing their feelings on account of 
this renewed evidence of the esteem and confidence reposed in 
them by the Association. A cordial invitation was extended to 
visiting brethren which was accepted by Bro. Bilbro of Johnson 
county Association aad Bro. E. W. Shearin of Roanoke Associa- 
tion. Bro. A. P. Mustian was welcomed as a new pastor who has 
accepted work among us during the past year. 

The following Committees were appointed: 

Finance, D. T. Smithwick, J as. White, June Perry. On or- 
der of busidess, T. J. Taylor, Ivey Allen and S. J. Alford. New 
churches, R. P. Walker, J. W. Sledge, G. W. May. Religious ex- 
ercises. Pastor and Deacons Samaria church. 

Bro. J. E. Hocutt pastor of church deli\ered an address of 
welcome to which Bro. G. W. May responded. Association ad- 
journed for dinner with prayer by Bro. J. W. Sledge. 

TUESDAY 2:15 P. M. 

The Association reassembled and sang a hymn and after 
praj'er by Bro. Coppedge proceeded to business. 

The Report on Aged Ministers Relief was read by Bro. Ivey 
Allen. Addresses were made by brethren Allen and Sledge and 
a collection was taken for this object amounting to $10.00 and the 
report was adopted. 



Minister's Relief. 

The Baptist Minister's Relief Board was established in 1890. 
The object of this Board is to afford relief to needy Baptist Minis- 
ters and their widows. The members of the Board are elected by 
the Baptist State Convention. At present the Board is located at 
Durham. Most of the members live in or near there and meet 
four times a year to consider applications for aid and to attend to 
other business of the Board. 

For some years it seemed hard to arouse much interest in the 
work of this Board, but for the past two or three years the contri- 
butions have been growing and the interest of the churches seems 
to be increasing-; though it is not anything like what it ought to 
be j^et. The last report of the Secretarj^, Bro. J. M. Arnette show- 
ed thirty-one beneficaries on the Board. Six of these Old Soldiers 
of the Cross died during the past winter. As a denomination we 
should feel that it was a privilege for us to be allowed to in any 
way make the sunset of life brighter for them 

I am sorry to see in looking- over the minutes of the last Asso- 
ciation that only eighteen churches reported any thing contributed 
to this object, thirty-four not having availed thenjselves of the 
privilege at all. I would be glad if each delegate present would 
register a vow here and now that this shall not be the case with 
his church another j^ear. Respectfully submitted by, 

I. Allen. 

The Report on Home Missions was read by Bro. L. W. 
Swope, and after addresses by Brethren R. P. Walker and G. W. 
May, the report was adopted. 

There being no report oa Temperance Bro. Swope was re- 
quested to prepare one for minutes. By request Bro. Willcox ad- 
dressed the association on the subject. 

Report on Home Missions for Tar River Association 1911. 

A quarter of a century ago, the great missionary problem 
was what we term (for a better name) Foreign. 

Then Home Missions was spoken of in whispered breath; 
but today, because of unprecedented immigration to our open 
doors, we have come to realize the already vast, and rapidly 
growing necessity for Home Missions. 

Present-day immigration is not only American-ward, but 
Dixie-ward. And, as it turn Southward, the work of the Home 
Board becomes more arduous. 

We have grown into the habit of saying the evangeliza- 
tion of the world depended largelyon the attitude of the United 
States, and so it does, bvit it now looks as if it were inore limited 
still, and would soon depend upon the Southland largely. 

And, if this is becoming true, she is "being weighed in the 
balances", but we hope not to be found "wanting." 

The South has proven hereelf equal to every emergency of 
the past and some of them have tried her soul. 

Now, if we have so heroically survived our adversities of 
shot and shell on gory battle-fields, how much more heroically 
should we discharge our duty on the bloodless tiattle-fields of 
peace to the "Captain of our Salvation". 



Our wonderful material g-reatness calls to us loudly "To g"ive 
as God has prospered us." 

Will we as true-hearted soldiers of the Cross consecrate our 
ineans to Christian service? 

This will be the supreme test of our g-reatness. If we fail 
here, we miserabl}' fail everj^where. 

A g-oodly land is promised us in this great South, and South 
West, let us "Go up and possess it" in the name of Christ. 

For full report of the work of the Home Board, see Xinutes 
of the Southern Baptist Convention for 1911. Signed: 

Committee- 

The Report on Sundaj^ Schools was prepared b)' Bro. Sledge, 
was read by Bro. Ivej^ Allen and an address was inade on the 
subject by Bro. J. J. Marshall and fui-ther discussion was post- 
poned and later adopted. The Committee on new churches re- 
ported favorablj', and new churches at Bunn and Norlina were 
admtited as members of the body and their dele- 

g-ates welcomed by the Moderator. A Committee on Time, Place, 
and Preacher for the next session consisting- of T. S. Collie, H, A. 
Nicholson and G. W. ?'lay were api^ointed. Adjourned after pra}'- 
er b}^ Bro. Marshall. 

Report on Sunday Schools. 

The Sundaj- School ma}- properl}- be regarded as the nursery 
of the Church, for a ver}' large per cent of the people who now 
join the Church, are those ti-ausplanted from the Sundaj^ School 
into the Church. A good Sunday School is the best evidence of 
vig-orous, healthy growth and development in a church, because 
if the Sundaj' School id what it ought to be, it is the whole church 
at work. 

All the the people should attend the Sunday School, becaiise 
it is one of the best waj's of keeping the Sabbath sacred and holy. 
Then too, there is no better place than in the Sunday- School, for 
g-aining real Biblical kuowledg-e. 

Sundaj" School work among Baptists was never more hope- 
ful. It is not what it oug-ht to be, but there are many reasons for 
encouragement. This j'ear we will report about 1,915 chixrches 
and 1,900 Sunday Schools, in which are enrolled nearly 180,000 
pui^ils. 

Let us take courage; establish schools in destitute places; 
and take Bro. Middleton's five key words— Organize, Enlarg-e, 
Improve, Train and Inspire, as a basis of operation. B}^ eo do- 
ing, we may hope to do great things for our Lord and Master, 
during the coming year. Respectfullv submitted, 

T. H. Sledge. 

WEDNESDAY 9:00 A. M. 

The Association naet and spent half hour in prayer and 
praise, service led by Bro. Mustian. Minutes read and approved. 
Visiting- brethren invited to seats, and brethren M. L. Kesler, 
General Manager of Orphanage, J. S. Farmer, representing Bib- 
lical Recorder, W. B. Morton of Columbia, and W. R. Cullom, 



Wake Forest Colleg-e accepted. Clerk read a letter from Rev. R. 
L. Davis with sug-g-ested resolution etc. when the following- reso- 
lution was unanimously adopted. Resolved: That we heartily 
endorse the Temperance work of the Anti-saloon League in our 
State and Nation, and request our representatives in Cong-ress 
and Senate to vote, and work for the passag-e of the Miller Cur- 
tis Bill or some similar law prohibiting- the shipment of intoxi- 
cating- liquors into prohibition territory. 

The following- resolution was offered by Bro. May: Re- 
solved that the Tar River Association endorse Bro. J. J. Marshall 
as its colporter. 2. Thac the pastors use him for supply and other 
special services when they can. 3. That the Executive Committee 
appropriate what the fund in hand will permit toward his sup- 
port. 

Report on Temperance 

We render our position in reg-ard to prohibition, and pledge 
oui selves to aid and uphold the officers of the law in the enforce- 
inent of the same, and recommend that our duffrag-e be g-iven on- 
ly to those who will honestly endeavor to enforce the law. 

G. G. O'Neill. 

Report on Education was read by Bro. Creech. Brethren 
Creech and J. S. Farmer and Taylor made addresses on g-enerai 
education, and on Ministerial education, speciall3'^ after which the 
report was abopted. 

Report on Ministerial Education. 

The progress of our Lord's Kin ydom in the world depends 
upon the leaders — the ministers. The Father's work now is by 
far the g-reatest it has ever been; therefore, the responsibility of 
His ministers is g-reater than the responsibilitj^ of any who have 
gone before. It is not greater in amount of work, for all have 
had what they could do, but greater in kind and depth of work. 
The world today is thinking, and has learned more during the 
last 25 years than during any proceeding centur5^ The masses 
of the people are making wonderful progress in every wa3^ The 
ministry should not onlj^ keep pace with the masses, but be a 
leap in the front. And the Church must be careful to see that 
this is realized; lest it fall into a "condition similar to that de- 
scribed by John Milton when he said, "The hungry sheep look 
up and are not fed." 

In an article in Current Literature of this month is a sen- 
tence which prett5^ well describes the future preacher. "The re- 
ligionist of the future, if he wishes to he listened to, must telt us 
something that is new and true, and of advantage to humanity." 
The article goes on to say that he must be an experienced bacte- 
riologist, must be a chemist, and must be able to justify his 
claims for Christianity and prove that it pays both individualy, 
socially, and nationally to be good. This is a scientific age. 
Men are discovering many wonderful things. And if our minis- 
ters hope to lead the people, they must know the sciences along 
with other things. Already they have been called upon to preach 
sanitation from the pulpit, and this is only the beginning. 

8 



lu the future the demand will be for preachers with busi- 
ness ability, a qualification that has been little emphasized thus 
far. If the Church had been g-overned bj' business rules as farm- 
ing-, inerchandizing-, etc. have been, we would not come to the 
association with pledg^es not met and pastors so poorly i^aid. 
The ministers will soon be required to manag'e their churches 
in a business-like manner. The Lajinen's Movement is rapidly 
bring^ing- this to pass. 

The ultiinate object in education is the heart. And the only 
avenue to the heart is the mind. Jesus Christ could not have 
loved a lost world if He had not known the condition of it. He 
loved the world because He knew the world. His infallible know- 
ledg^e gave him the God- Heart. I believe that God never calls a 
man into the ministry tmless he has a mind and heart that are 
capable of being- developed above the average man. And after 
God selects the material, if necessary, He expects his people to 
develop it. In educating our ministers -w^e give them bi'oader 
visions, deeper minds, and naoi-e compassionate hearts. Then 
they are prepared to g-ive ua more in return. The greater the 
investment, the greater income we expect and receive. 

Oscar Creech. 

Report on Periodicals was called for and in absence of re- 
port the Association was addressed by brethren J. S. Farmer and 
R. P. Walker. 

Report on Associational Missions. 

For a number of years this Association has been engaged in 
Aseociational Mission work — that is, in preaching- the Gospel in 
destitute sections v.-ithin out bounds. The blessings of the Lord 
have rested on the work from the beginning-, and to read the his- 
tory of the number of the chuicbes organized, and souls saved 
through preaching- the Gospel by missionaries employed is very 
much like reading- a chapter from the Acts of the Apostles. 

The willingness with which the churches have responded to 
the calls made upon them for men and money, and the long num- 
ber of years that these calls liave been made, is almost uuparalled 
in the history of Christian giving. 

When the Roanoke Association was formed out of the Tar 
River Association the larg-er partof tlie destitution v/as with them, 
but much of it remains with the old Tar River. We have been 
trying as best we could to occupy it. So Jong- as there is destitu- 
tion within our bounds, so long as there are homes without the 
knowledge of Christ, so long- as there are souls without God and 
without hope, so long will the dem.mds be made upon us, and I 
am sure that the churches of this Association will respond in the 
future as they ha\e in the past, as giving- to this cause has en- 
larged our liberality and broadened our spiritual horizon along- 
all the other lines of Christian activil3'. 

The following fields are being- occupied by the brethren whose 
names are given: Roanoke Rapids and Roseoriary by G. G. 
O'Neill; Norlina by G. T. Tunstall; Turkey Branch and A. sops by 
A. G. Willcox; Mount Hermon by D. T. Bunn; North and South 
Pienderson by J. H. Spaulding; Kittrell Field by E, K. Nelson; 
Bethesda by Walla-^e Hartsell. These churches so far as we can 
learn are making- satisfactory progress. 

9 



Your committee recommends that we increase our pledges 
to at least $1,500.00 to meet the growing- demands. 

G. M, Duke. 

Hour for special order having arrived Report on Aseocia- 
tional Missions was read by Bro. Morton for Bro. Duke. Soul 
stirring addresses were made by Brethren Spaulding, May and 
Duke after which the roll of churches was called and the amounts 
below pledged for Associational Missions for next j'ear. 

Henderson $ 175 00 

Louisburg .. 150 00 

Warrenton 60 00 

Browns 60 00 

Roanoke Rapids 60 OO 

Maple Springs 50 00 

New Bethel 50 00 

Turkey Branch 50 00 

Castalia 45 00 

W. M. S 5 00 

Macon 40 00 

Samaria 40 00 

Sandy Creek 40 00 

Bear Swamp 30 00 

Cedar Rock 33 00 

Harris' Chapel 30 00 

Philadelphia 30 00 

Poplar Springs 30 00 

Corinth 25 CO 

Cypress Chapel 25 00 

Gardners 25 00 

Middleburg 25 00 

Red Bud 25 00 

Warren Plains 25 00 

Bunn 22 50 

Mt. Zion 22 00 

Antioch 20 00 

Rock Spring 20 00 

Peach Tree 18 00 

Ephesus 17 50 

Bethesda 15 00 

Enterprise 15 00 

Jo^mers Chapel 15 00 

Littleton 15 00 

Reedy Creek ... 15 CO 

Rosemary 15 00 

Sulphur Spring - 15 00 

Vaughan 12 CO 

S. Henderson 12 00 

Quankie 11 00 

Advance 10 CO 

Cary Chapel 10 00 

Kittrell 10 00 

Marmaduke 10 00 

Midway 10 00 

10 



Mt. Hebron 10 00 

N. Henderson 10 00 

Sharon 10 00 

White Level 10 00 

Norlina 10 00 

Social Plains 8 00 

Mountain Grove 7 00 

Mt. Hermon 5 00 

New Sandy Creek 5 00 

Total $ 1,508 00 

After which the report waa adopted. Treasurer of Executive 
Committee offered his report which was adopted. Adjourned for 
dinner with prayer by Bro. >Iorton. 

WEDNESDAY 1:30 P. M. 

The Association after reassembling- was led in prayer by 
Bro. A. M. Broug-hton. 

Report on State Missions was read by Bro. R. P. Walker, and 
after thrilling- addresses b^^ Brethien Morton and Walker the re- 
port was adopted. 

State Missions. 

To give the Gospel to the destitute sections of North Caro- 
lina was one of the prime motives that prompted the org-anization 
of the Baptist State Convention in 1832. That is the prime object 
of our district associations. The work is called State Missions be- 
cause this board operates only within the bounds of our State. 

To write the history of State Missions would be to give a 
history of all the leading churches in North Carolina. The first 
church to be helped by this board was the First Baptist Church 
of Wilmington, In the year 1S32 that church received $100. Now 
the Baptists are very strong in that cit}^ having three large self- 
sustaining churches. Today that board is aiding weak churches 
from the mountains to the seashore, and God has greatly blessed 
the efiforts of the missionaries on the vfirious fields of labor. 

In Eastern North Carolina the Baptist destitution is very 
g-reat Only a few of the churches are self-sustaining-, even in 
towns. This is due largely to the neglect of these fields in the 
past. 

In'central North Carolina the great problem is to give the 
g-ospei to cotton mill communities. These people came from their 
farms to these rapidly growing manufacturing commnnities and 
they must have the gospel, for they are largely Baptist people. 
This part of State Mission work will be upon ns as long- as time 
lasts, because these people are not able, in most cases, to support 
a pastor. 

In the Western part of our State, the Baptists possess the 
land, but small towns are springing- up every year, and the peo- 
ple are going- to these new towns, and we must have these places 
held by good strong Baptist pastors. If we fail to do this, the 
cause will suffer all through the years to come. 

11 



Last year we had liS missionaries employed under the Board, 
and they preached 9,445 sermons, reenlting- in 3,002 professions 
of faith tn Christ, 2,227 of whom followed Him in baptism. There 
were 14 new chvirches org-anized, 26 cliur'^h buildingrs coaipleted, 
and 68 are being- built. We paid to State Missions last year $41,- 
428.46. Theeechurches aided by the State Mission Board g-ave to all 
objects, last year, $67,494.28. There was a clear g-ain of $26,065.82 
to the denomination, to say nothing- of those 2,227 souls who were 
added to the churches by baptism. 

This year we are trying- to raise $-18, 000. OOforthis wori, andhow 
easy it could be done if the 224, 000 Baptists would only do what they 
can. If every Baptist would give 25 cents we would have $8,000 
more than enoug-h to pay every dollar we owe. We sug-g-est that 
we take October and November as our time to help in this glorious 
work, that we urg-e our pastors to preach on State Missions during- 
this time, and that we pray the Lord of the harvest to send forth 
more laborers into the harvest. 

Robert P. Walker. Committee. 

The report on Foreign Missions and Woman's Work was 
read by Bro. T. J. Taylor who followed the report with a soul 
stirring- address, and a resolution by Brother Walker that we 
raise eighteen hundred dollars for said object during the coming- 
year. The report was adopted. 

Report on Foreign Missions. 
"go teach all nations." 

"Go ye into all the world and preach the gospel to every 
creature." This is the last command of our blessed Lord and 
is binding upon all his disciples. By it his people ate committed 
to the great work of preaching- the g'o.'^pel throughout the whole 
world, and tho^e who neg-lect or refuse to do it are disobedient to 
our Lord and Master. 

"The world is the field," and "the field is white unto the 
harvest" and it is our duty and privilege to prosecute this work. 
Therefore, "let ua go up and possess the land; for we are well 
able to overcome it." 

Southern Baptists have heard this call to service, and are 
responding- to it. In order to carry out this work more elSciently 
our churches are joined tooether in Associations and Conven- 
tious. All these are united in a larg-e bodj^ covering- our entire 
territory kaown as the Southern Baptist Convention. This Con- 
vention prosecutes its work through three boards; known as the 
Sunday School Board, the Home Mission Board and the Foreign 
Mission Board. The Foreign Mission Board is located in Rich- 
mond, Va., and is the ag-eocy through which our people preach 
the Gospel in Foreign Countries, and thus endeavor to obey the 
last command of our blessed Lord. 

In order that 3'ou may be fully informed with reference to 
the work we are doing- throagh our board in foreig-n lands, and 
♦rusting- that this information may be an inspiration to you, I 
pubmit ' the latest facts" published by our Foreig-n Missioa 
Board with reference to our work in foreig-n lands. 

12 



"FORCES AND RESULTS" 

"Thirty new missionaries were sent out during- the year. 
There are now 273 uaissionaries and 531 native helpers, making a 
total of 804 workers. Among- these are 15 medical missionaries 
and five trained nurses working- in seven hospitals and 12 dis- 
pensaries, who treated durinjf last year 40,716 patients and led 
many to Christ." 

"The report shows 297 churches and 605 outstations with a 
membership of 21,343. We have 233 houses of worship and 372 
Sunday Schools with 13,226 scholars. There are 175 day schools 
4,068 pupils; 11 boys' Boarding- Schools with 034 students; 18 girls' 
Boarding Schools with 958 students and 2 colleges with 118 stu^ 
dents. Special attention is called to the fact that there are 7 wo- 
men's Training Schools with 140 students and 9 Theological 
Training Schools with 212 students. The four mission printing 
presses are sending out Bibles and milions of pages of religious 
literature. Our Missions are in China, Africa, Japan, Mexico, 
Italy, Brazil and Argentina. The reports coming from all the 
fields are niost encouraging and the outlook is exceedingly hope- 
ful. 

"finances" 

"The total receipts for the year were $510,008.97, a small gain 
over the year before. An accumulated debt of $89,600 now rests 
upon the work. This should be paid off this year. To do so and 
tuaintain the work as it now is, will require at least $600,000. Will 
the churches give it? It is a condition that calls for greatly en- 
larged giving-, but it is absolutely imperative unless our people 
are willing to let this great caiise suffer. Let us raise this amount 
and even more that we may make an advance in the work. 

' 'EXPENSES' ■■ 

"The Board's disbureements for the 3'ear are; 

"Sent to the foreign fields $487, 481, 

"Expenses in Richmond, $32,325, or per cent, of receipts. 

"Expenses in the States, $17,223, or 3 1-2 percent, of receipts. 

"For interest, $13,031, or 2 1-2 per cent, of receipts. 

"The amount expended in Richiiiond includes our share of 
the expenses of the woniau's work and the laymen's movement. 
Our expenses in the various States are due to the fact that nearly 
all the State Boards require us to pay a part of their expenses for 
representing us in their States. The large interest account can 
be eliminated if all the churches will adoj.t a systematic plan for 
collecting funds all through the year and if all the treasurers will 
send forward the funds promptly. With the interest account 
taken away, all our expenses would amount to less than 10 cents 
on the dollar. 

"LEGACIES AKD ANNUITIES" 

"The Board often receives great help in the form of lega» 
cies. Many of our people aie abundantly able, and it is very im- 
portant that tney should leave a part of their means to this great 
work. The following is the legal form of bequest to the Board: 
'T hereby give and bequeath to the Foreign Mission Board of the 
Southern Baptist C invention, chartered by the Legislature of 
Virginia, by an act approved February 23, 1888 (here insert the 

13 



amount, if in money, or description, of other propertj^ real or 
personal), for the purpose contemplated by said Board.' 

"A better arrangement is to g-ive money to the Board on the 
annuity plan. Those who wish to give to foreign missions and 
yet need an income from their property while they live, can by 
this plan, make a gift to the Board and receive an annuity on the 
amount while they live. In this waj^ the large legacy tax is avoid- 
ed. The donors are provided with a definite income without the 
expense or worry about taxes, insurance or repairs. For infor- 
mation, write to the Corresponding Secretary of the Foreign Mis- 
sion Board Richmond Va. 

"missionary information" 

"The Foreign Mission Journal, which is the vital means of 
communication between the workers on the field and the people 
at home, has had a prosperous year. It ought to go into every 
Baptist home. Let us begin at once a campaign to increase the 
circulation to 100,000. Send for our premium listaud secure clubs 
of subscribers for us. 

"An abundance of leaflets and tracts for distribution may 
be had for the asking. 

"The Kducational Department of the Board is doing a great 
work. Any book on missions can be had from this Department. 

"Mission Study Classes are growing more and more popu- 
lar each j^ear. There ought to be one or more classes in every 
church. Write to the Educational Secretary of the Foreign Mis- 
sion Board or particulars. 

"CONCLUSION." 

"It is sad that the Board inust say to the young people who 
are readj^ and anxious to go to the front, *We cannot send you 
this year,' and to the over-burdened missionaries who are plead- 
ing for help. 'You must wait another year.' Our people are abun- 
dantly able to supply all these needs. Let us thank God for the 
past year's abundant blessings oa all the fields and resolve that 
this year shall witness the most glorious efforts for world wide 
missions ever known in the history of Southern Baptists. The 
Convention adopted unaniiuously a resolution c dling upon all 
our people to send forward as earl}'^ as possible gifts for this work 
to relieve the heav}^ pressure on the Board. If a speedy and l-frge 
response is made the work can be not only maintained, but ad- 
vanced." 

You see from this that we are engaged in a great work, that 
the Lord is graciously blessing our efforts and that there remains 
very much to be done. In order that v^e may push the work more 
earnestly recommend Ibat we undertake to raise during the 
next year the sum of eighteen ($1,800) hundred dollars. 

Respectfuliv submitted, 
t. J. Taylor. 

The Woman's Missionary Union. 

Tha W. M. U., Auxiliary of the Tar River Association begs 
leave to submit the following report to the Tar River Association: 

On Sept., 28 and 29 VNre held our Annua! meeting at Middle- 
burg, at which 16 of the 28 organizations in the Union we~e rei>- 
resented by delegates and 7 by letter*. The reports and discus- 

14 



sions of the various phases of work showed deep enthusiasm and 
spirituality and we feel encouraged to believe that by God's help 
our women are going to do better work another year than ever 
before. 

Mrs. L. W. Bag-lej', Littleton, N. C, was elected President 
for the coming- j^ear to succeed the present officer who found it 
necessary to resign her office. With such an efficient leader we 
hope that much can be done in the next j^ear to stimulate interest 
notonly in the societies already organized, but in organizing new 
societies. 

We take as our monied aim for next year .$685 and hope we 
can not only reach but pass that aim. 

Respectfull}' submitted, 

(Miss) Sallie Allen, Pres. 

The report on the Orphanage was next thing to claim at 
tention of the body when Bro. G. W. May read the report, and 
after addresses by brethren May and Kesler and a cash collec- 
tion amounting to $12. Gl the report was adopted. 

Report on the Orphanage. 

The Orphanage was organized Nov. 11, 1885 bat preceding 
the organization a great battle had been fought for childhood 
among our people, which led to a revival in ail our work. We 
owe to the Orphanage therefore a vote of thanks for the great 
work we are doing now all along the line and as we do nearer our 
duty to the Orphanage we will do more for state, home and for- 
eign work. 

The total enrollment to last Annual Meeting was 1192; pres- 
ent at that time 335. 

There are more than 100 needy applicants, pleading for ad- 
mission, and new appeals every daj^. Shall we stop our ears to 
the cry of boys and girls or will we rise to their need? 

It costs about $80 per year besides repairs of buildings to 
support a child. The average dail}^ expens~s are about $100.00. 
Children are received between 5 and 12 years of age. 

The boj's are taught to work on the farm, shoe shop, print- 
ing office and v^rhen the new technical building is completed the3'' 
will have a chance of other trades. The girls are trained in keep- 
ing house and all domestic duties. 

Charity and Children has a subscription list of 16,000. 
Every Sunday School ought to take a club of 10 or more copies, 
which will be obtained at 60 cents per 3 ear. Each Sundaj' School 
ought to take a collection each month for the Orphanage. There 
are some 1200 sclioois that do not do so out of 1700. 

We have 15 elegant and we"l eq'aiv>ped buildings but we 
need two or three more at once. The school is one of the best in 
the State so far as it goes because we have charge of the child all 
the year and larg-ely put into practic il use the theories in the text 
books. 

Four mules and three horses are hardly sufficient to do the 
draught work of tlie institution, while thirtj^-five cows contribiite 
to its support and health. Thatdvsgiving is Orphanage day with 
Baptist peov^le. Let us make it a great day this year by larger 
contributions than ever before. 

15 



Where are our Orphanage boys and girls? is a question 
often asked. They are not put out to service as in former days 
but are kept in the institution until they finish their course in 
school, and then they are aided in g-etting' a place to work, or go 
to some higher institution of learning. 

G. W. May, 

Committee. 

The Executive Committee for the next year was elected as 
follows: T. J. Taylor, Ivey Allen, G. W. May, G. M. Duke and 
J. M. Gardner. 

The following delegates were appointed to Baptist State 
Convention: G. W. May, A. G. Willcox, Ivey Allen. To Southern 
Baptist Convention: Rev. T. J. Taylor. Treasurer of Association 
offered his report with the Auditor's which was adopted. 

The folio iving report on hospitality was offered by Bro. 
May which was adopted by a rising vote. Resolved: That the 
thanks of this body are eminently due, and most heartilj^ tendered 
to the members of the church at Samaria and community at large 
for their unbounded hospitality so freely and so lavishly bestowed. 

The Clerk was instructed to have the usual number of min- 
utes printed, and to draw on the general fund for any deficiency 
in defraying expenses of same. The thanks of the body was ten- 
dered to the Moderator and Clerk for their faithful and efficient 
service. 

The following resolution of the joint Committee to raise 
funds to secure fence and tomb stone for Bro. Webb's grave was 
passed unanimouslj': 

We the joint Committee appointed at last session of the 
Tar River and Roanoke Associations to devise plans and raise 
funds to have the grave of Bro. Jas. T. Webb fenced, and marked 
by suitable tomb stones, beg leave to submit the following report 
and recommendation: 

1. That soon after the said session the Committee meet 
and organize, by electing D. F. Putnam, Chairman, J. T. Fulford 
Secretary, and W. M. Warren Treasurer. 

2. Some funds have been raised, but not sufficient amount 
to do the work creditably. 

3. We recommend that each pastor take a collection for this 
purpose in all the churches of the tvro bodies, and forward same 
to Treasurer W. M. Warren, Spring Hope, N. C. 

4. We feel that we owe this debt to this man who did so 
much for our Lord's cause in the territory occupied by the two 
associations. 

D. F. Putnam, J. T. Fulford, Ccmmiltee on Time, Place and 
Preacher for next session report Red Bud, Franklin county, as 
the place. Time, Tuesday after the first Sunday in October 1912. 
To preach the introductory sermon, G. M. Duke, alteruatej T. J, 
Taylor. 

IS 



Fiaance Coinmittee report as follows: We, jour Committee, 
report tSiat we ha re received: 

For Minutes $ 60 70 

For Associational Missions 691 25 

For State Missions o3 05 

For Home Missions 6 70 

For Foreign Missions 16 25 

For Sunday School Missions 1 00 

For Ministerial Education 4 50 

For Ministerial Relief 9 71 

Fcr Orplianajjfe ._. 15 62 

For Other Objects 5 70 

Total $867 48 

D. T. Smithwick I 
J. R. White VCommittee. 

J. N. Perry j 

Treasurer of Executive Committee of the Association offer- 
ed this report which was adopted. 

IVEY Allex, Treasurer of Executine Committee 

IX AccouxT With Tar River Associatiox. 

1910. 

Oct. 4 To balance on hand $179 14 

By amount paid A. G. Willcox on Minutes, . 10 00 

Balance on hand October, 3, 1911 $ 169 14 

Audited and approved, 

T. S. Collie, Committee. 

Report of Executive Committee. 

The Executive Committee held its first meeting- for the j'ear 
at Franklinton, Nov. 1st. 1910. The special object of this meeting- 
was consideration of the appropriations for the mission work of 
the Association. After a careful consideration of the field and its 
needs, appropriations were recommended for the different points 
as follows: 

Roanoke Rapids and Rosemary $ 250 00 

North and South Henderson 250 00 

Kittrell 150 00 

Panacea Springs 100 00 

Mount Hermon 50 00 

Alsop's Chapel - 50 00 

Norlina 40 00 

Bethesda 40 00 

The appropriations for Alsop's Chapel' and Norlina were 
recommended with the condition that a church should be orga- 
nized at each of these points at an opportune time during the 
year. That for Panacea Springs with the understanding thatBro. 
Walker take collections at each appointment for missions and re- 

17 



tain these collections on his salary, reporting- to the State Bofud 
the amount of each; and if, at the close of the year he had not 
collected as much as $100 the deficienc3- should be met by the 
Board. If he collected more than $100 the excess should be paid 
over to the Board. 

The next meeting- of the Committee was held in Warrenton 
in February. There was a general discussion of the work in the 
Association and the application af Bro. Lloyd to the Ministerial 
Relief Board for assistance was endorsed. 

At the meeting- of the Association at Sharon, two years ago 
the Coinmittee, in its report, suggested consideration of some 
plan for employing some brother for special evangelistic work 
for some time during the sxxmmer. So far nothing has been done 
along this line. We have very few Pastors in the Association in 
proportion to our membership and the work on them is burden- 
some. The Committee feels that this work might be beneficial to 
both churches and pastors. But this should be done in addition 
to our regular mission work, and as an aid to it, for we need to 
prosecute the associational work with greater vigor than ever. 

The work done for the year on different mission fields, the 
present conditions and needs of the work are embodied in Bro. 
Duke's report on Associational Missions and need not be re- 
peated here. 

Respectfullj' submitted by the Executive Committee. 

Treasurer of Association offered his report which was 
adopted. 

TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 
In Account With A. G. Willcox, Tr. 

Oct. 1910. 

To amount due Association at last session $ 1 29 

Received from Finance Committee for Asso. Missions 469 83 

" Stnte " 25 66 

" Home " 6 50 

" " " " •' Foreign " 5 00 

" " " Committ. for Sunday School " 3 50 

" *" Finance Committee for Education 12 42 

" Aged Ministers 2 50 

" Orphanage 19 15 

" Minutes-"- 56 65 

" " " " Farraville church..- 14 50 

" Kittrell " — . 2 00 

', Other objects 4 35 

Excess 12 14 

Cash Collection Aged Ministers 12 47 

Orphanage 27 00 

ivouisbtirg for Associational Missions 125 00 

" Minutes 2 00 

Sharon for Associational Missions 31 00 

Turkev Branch for Asso. " 7 GO 

Social Plains for Minutes 1 00 

Ivey Allen for Minutes 10 00 

851 21 

18 . 



Contra. 

By amount paid Walters Durham for State Missions $630 15 

By amount paid Living-ston Johnson for State Missions __25 66 

By amount paid Living-ston Johnson for Home Missions 6 50 

Foreign Missions 5 00 

Sunday School Missions 3 50 

Education 12 42 

Ag-ed Ministers 2 50 

Cash collection ag-ed ministers 12 47 

Archibald Johnson for Orphanag-e 16 50 

Archibald Johnsin cash collection for Orphanag-e 27 00 

S. H. Averitc for Orphanag^e 3 00 

Noah Big-g^s for Farmville church 14 50 

Mrs. C.H. Williams, Kittrell church 2 00 

J. C. Hardy for printing- minutes 60 00 

Clerk's fee 25 00 

Expenses 2 00 

Total disbursements $848 20 

To balance due Association 3 01 

Total $851 21 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. G. WiLLCox, Treas. 
Examined and approved, 

T. S. Collie, Aud. 

The order of business for the next session -with the Stand- 
ing- Committee were appointerl. (See second pag-e). 

The business of the Association having- been completed and 
after one of the most delig^htful sessions, Bro. Taylor offered up 
a most appropriate, earnest, feeling- praj^er. The Moderator de- 
clared the Association adjourned, to meet -with the church at Red 
Bud, Franklin County, on Tuesday after the First Sunday in 
October, 1912, at 11:00 o'clock 
A. G. W^iLLCOX, Clerk. G. M. DuKE, Moderator 

TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 

Time and Places of Meetings. 

1. Sandy Creek, Franklin county, commencing- on fourth Sun- 
day in Octob-r, 1831. 

2. Maple Spring-s, Franklin county, commencing- on Thursday 
before fourth Sunday in October, 1832. 

3 Hickory Chapel, Nash county, Thursday before fourth Sun- 
day in October, 1833. 

4. Brown's, Warren couuty, Saturday before fourth Sunday in 
October, 1834. 

5. Red Bud, Franklin county, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
October, 1835. 

.6 Shiloh, Franklin county, 23-25th of October, 1846. 

.7 Peach Tree, Nash county, Saturday before fourth Sunday in 
October, 1837. 

8. Reedy Creek, Warren county, Friday before fourth Sunday 
in October, 18.38. 

19 



9. Flat Rock, Franklin county, Saturday before fourth Sunday 
in October, 1839. 

10 Bear Swanip, Halifax countj', Saturdaj' before fourth Sun- 
day in October, 1810. 

11. Louisbury, Saturday before first Sunday in October, 1841. 

12. Gardner's, Warren countj^, October, 1842. 

13. Poplar Spring's, Franklin county, Friday before first Sun- 
day in October, 1843. 

14. Brown's, Warren countv, Saturday before first Sunday in 
October, 1844. 

15. Maple Spring's, Franklin county, Saturday before first Sun- 
day in October, 1845. 

16. Sandy Creek, Franklin county, 24th October, 1846 

17. Enon, Warren county, Friday before first Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1847. 

18. Hickorj', Nash counly, Friday before first Sunday in Octo- 
ber. 1848. 

19. Haywood's (now Corinth), Franklin county, Friday before 
first Sunday in October, 1849, 

20. Red Bud, Franklin county, Friday after first Sunday in Oc- 
tober, 1850. 

21. Warreaton, Friday before first Sunday in October, 1851. 

22. Flat Rock, Franklin, county, Friday before first Sundaj' in 
October, 1852. 

23. Peach Tree, Nash county, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
Aug-ust, 1853. 

24. Reedy Creek, Warren coiiuty, Friday before fourth Sunday 
in Aug-ust, 1854. 

25. Perry's Chapel, Franklin county, Friday before fourth Sun- 
day in Aug^ust, 1855. 

26. Salem, Wilson county, Friday before fourth Sunday in Au- 
g'ust, 1856. 

27. Gardner's, Warren county, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
August, 1857. 

28. Poplar Spring-, Franklin county, Friday after third Sunday 
in Aug-ust, 1858. 

29. Sharon, Warren county, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
Aug-ust, 1859. 

30. Frank linton, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 1860. 

31. Maple Spring-s, Franklin count}', Friday before fourth Sun- 
daj' in August, 1861. 

32. Brown's, Warren county, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
August, 1862. 

33. Red Bud, Franklin county, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
August, 1803 

34. Mt. Zion, Franklin county. 

35. Hickory Chapel, Nash county, Friday before fourth Sunday 
in September, 1865. 

36. Bear Swamp, Nash county, Friday after first Sunday in Oct- 
tf.ber, 1866. 

37. Cypress Chapel, Franklin county, Friday before first Sun- 
day in October, 1867. 

38. Red Oak, Nash count}', Friday before first Sunday in Oc- 
ober, 1868. 

39. Sharen, Warren countv, Friday after fourth Sunday in Oc- 
tober, 1869. 

20 



40. Poplar Springs, Frankliu county, Thursday before first 
Sunday in October, 1870. 

41. Haywoods (now Corinth), Franklin countj', Thursday be- 
fore first Sunday in October, 1871. 

42. Sandy Creek, Franklin county, Thursday be.ore first Sun- 
day in October, 1872. 

43. Wilson Friday before first Sunday in October, 1873. 

44. Philadelphia, Nash county, October 1-3, 1874. 

45. Reedy Creek, Warren county, Thursday before first Sun- 
day in O tober, 1875. 

46. Henderson, September 28-30, 1879. 

47. Pleasant Grove, Nash county, October 4-6, 1877. 

48. Conoconara, Halifax county, October 10-12, 1878. 

49. Louisburg-, October 9-12, 1879. 

50. Peach Tree, Naeh county, October 6-8, 1880. 

51. Antioch, Halifax county, 1881. 

52. Littleton, October 5 7, 1882. 

53. Rock Springf, Franklin county, October 11.13, 1883. 

54. Mt. Zion, Franklin county, October 9-11, 1884. 

55. Wilson, October 8 10, 1885. 

56. Brown's, Warren county, October 7-9, 1886. 

57. Samaria, Nash county, October 4-6, 1887. 

58. Maple Spring-, Franklin county, October 11-13, 1888. 

59. Gardner's, Warren county, October 10-12, 1889. 

60. Greenville, October 9-11, 1890. 

61. Warrenton, October 8-10, 1891. 

62. Louisburg, October 5-7, 1892. 

63. Philadelphia, October 5-7, 1893, 

64. Scotland Neck, October 11-13, 1894. 

65. Wilson, October 9-11, 1895. 

66. Poplar Spring-, October 7-9, 1896. 

67. Stoney Creek, October 5-7, 1897. 

68. Wedlon, October 4-6, 1898. 

69. Warren Plains, October 3-5, 1899. 

70. Spring- Hope, October 16-18, 190(3. 

71. Corinth, October 8-10, 1901. 

72. Washing-ton, October 6-8, 1902. 

73. Rocky Mount, October 6 8. 1903. 

74. Maple Springs, October 4-6, 1904. 
75 Tarboro, October 3-5, 1905. 

76. Red Oak, October 9-11, 1906. 

77. Henderson, October 7-9, 1907. 

78. Sandy Creek, October 27-28-29. 1908. 

79. Sharon, October 5-7, 1909. 

80. New Bethel, October 4-2-6, 1910. 

81. Samaria, October 3-4, 1911. 

RULES OF DECORUM. 

Believing it is beat to be governed by certain rules and regula- 
tions in conducting the business of the Association, we adopt the 
following: 

1. The Association shall be opened and closed with a prayer. 

2. Not more than one person shall speak at a time, who shall 
rise from his seat and address the Moderator. 

3. The person thus speaking shall not be interrupted, unless 
he violates some rule of decorum. 

21 



4. The person speaking- shall adhere strictly to the subject, and 
in nowise reflect on any other brother. 

5. No brother shall absent himstlf from the Association with- 
out obtaining- pertnission ircm the body. 

6. No brother shall speak more than twice on the same sub- 
ject without unanimous consent. 

7. No person shall whisper while a brother is speaking-. 

8. The names of the delegates shall be enrolled by the Clerk, 
and called as often as the Association requires. 

9. The Moderator may give his ideas on any subject before 
putting- it to the vote, but is entitled to vote only in case of a tie. 

10. An order of business shall be made at the beg-inning- of 
each session, and shall be chang-ed only by vote of the body. 

CONSTITUTION. 

1. The Association shall be composed of the pastors and of the 
members chosen by the churches, who shall oroduce letters cer- 
tifying- their appointment. Members thus chosen and convened, 
together with the pastors, shall be denominated The Tar River 
Baptist Association, which shall have no power over the churches, 
nor shall it infring-e on any of their rig-hts. 

2. The letters from the churches shall contain the number then 
in fellowship and those baptized, received by letter, dismissed, 
excluded and died since last Association. 

3. The officers of the Association shall be a Moderator, Clerk, 
Treasurer and Historian, who shall be chosen by the suffragecs 
of the members present. 

4. Other churches, upon petition by letter and bj delegates, 
and after a satisfactory examination of their Articles of Faith, 
may be admitted to the body by a unanimous vote, when the 
Moderator shall g-i /e to the deleg-ates the right hand of fellow- 
ship. 

5. Every church in this Association is entitled to one repre- 
sentative, but no church more than three. 

6. Every motion made and seconded shall be left to the dis- 
cretion ot the Association whether it shall be debated or not. 

7. The Association shall endeavor to furnish the churches with 
copies of its Minutes. 

8. The Minutes of the Association shall be read and approved, 
and should be sig-ned by the Moderator and Clerk before the As- 
sociation adjourns. 

9. Any church not representing- itself in this body for three 
successive sessions, by letter or deleg-ates, shall be stricken from 
the roll of the churches, unless satisfactory reasons are assigned. 

10. The Association shall withdraw fe]lows.hip from any church 
which shall be found disorderly in faith or practice. 

11. Visiting brethren from siester churches, or similar bodies, 
may be invited to participate in our deliberations. 

12. At each session of the Association deleg-ates to the Baptist 
State Convention and to the Southern Baptist Coivention shall be 
chosen bj' vote. 

13. This Constitution is subject to alteration by a majority vote 
of the deleg-ates enrolled at any session. 

14. The business of the Association shall be con iucted accord- 
ing- to Mell's Parliamentar3^ Practice, 

22 



SUNDAY SCHOOL STATISTICS 



CHURCHES 



Superintendents and Postoffice 



Secretaries and Postoffice 



£•[■0 



=5« ^ ?„r 



Advance 

Antioch 

Bear Swamp 

Bethesda 

Bethlehem 

Browns 

Bunn 

Gary Chapel 

Castalia 

Cedar Rock 

Corinth 

Cypress Chapel 

Enterprise 

Ephesus 

Gardners 

Harris Chapel.... 

Henderson 

John Chapel 

Joyners Chapel.. 

Kittrells 

Littleton 

Louisburg- 

Macon 

Maple Springs... 

Marmaduke 

Middleburg 

Midway 

Mountain Grove 

Mt. Hebron 

Mt. Herman 

Mt. Zion 

New Bethel 

New Sandy C'k.. 
No. Henderson.. 

Norlina 

Peach Tree 

Philadelphia 

Poplar Springs.. 

Quankie 

KedBud 

Reedy Creek 

Roanoke Rapids 

Rock Springs 

Rosemary 

Samar.ia 

Sandy Creek 

Sharon 

Social Plains 

So. Henderson... 

Sulphur Spgs 

Vaughan 

Turkey Branch.. 
Warren Plains.. 

Warrenton 

White Level 



M. D. Woodlief, Kittrell 

Geo. Bennett, Heathsville 



Miss Martha Garrett, Kittrell. 
J. H. Lewis, Heathsville 



E. A. Watkins, Goldleaf. Va. 
C. D. Hemmings, Rosemary.. 

S. L. Bobbitt, Henderson 

J.N. Perry, Wakefield 

A. H. Hoyle, Henderson 

S. J. Bartholomew, Castalia... 

J.B, Ful ghum, Louisburg 

J. G. Faulkner, Louisburg 

H. W. Wilder, Mapleville 



W. M. Warren, Spring Hope. 

H. E. Rodwell, Macon 

J. R. WoUett. Terrapin 

R. H. Burns, Henderson , 



J. H. Massey, Wakefield 

Mrs. E. B. Williams, Kittrell.. 

J. ACree, Littleton 

J. Allen, Louisburg 

J. L. Colman, Macon 

J. W. Strange. Mapleville 



R, L. Bennett, Middleburg 
J. M. Wester, Spring Hope., 



B. C. Joyner, Elm City 

J. H. Harper, Louisburg 

W. B, Daniel, Henderson... 

C. G. Ha ten, Henderson.... 
T. G. Walters, Henderson. 



H. Rich Edwards, .Spring Hope.. 



J. H. Cheaves, Sutton.. 



T. S. Collie, Castalia 

W. T. Robertson, Inez 

W. S. Hancock, Foanoke Rapids 

M. Faison. Rosemary 

W. A. Wbeliss, Louisburg 

A. L. Murray, Middlesex 

A. J. Joyner, Louisburg 



W. B. Brantley, Wakefield. 
T. M. Pitman. Henderson... 

J. A. Shepherd, Elberon 

C. J. Tucker, Vaughn 



W. E. Hawks, Warren Plains.. 

A. D. Harris, Warrenton 

J. W. Wood, Louisburg 



Total 



L. A. Bowren, Goldleaf 

C. O. King, Aurelian Sprint 

S. E. Allen, Manson 

W. A. Mullin, Mapleville 

B. D. Adcock, Henderson 

ZoUie Wheliss. Castalia 

Taylor Boon, Louisburg 

R. D. Pernell, Louisburg 

Tommy Lavmn, Mapleville. 



L. M. Edwards, Spring Hope. 

J. C. Gardner. Macon 

Ivy Crawley, Essex 

J. R. Teague, Henderson 



Howard Massey, Wakefield. 



Harvey Cordle. Littleton... 
Blair Tucker, Louisburg... 

Lee Riggan, Macon 

H. H. Holgood. Mapleville 



Miss Tazzie Parham 

J. H. Bunn, Spring Hope. 



F. Joyner, Elm City 

W. T. Johnson, Louisburg.. 

W. L Duke, Henderson 

W. G. J. Falkin, Henderson.. 

G. H. Parish, Henderson 



W. L. Edwards, Spring Hope.. 



W. M. Pearce, Spring Hope. 



W. J. Lancaster, Castalia 

Miss Grady Powell, Grove Hill... 

S. C. C.iok 

C. A. Dickens, Rosemary 

Miss Ina Strickland, Louisburg., 

Burney Murray, Middlesex 

C. G. West, Louisburg 



H. B. HagT^'ood. Wakefield 

B. R. Rooker, Henderson 

T. H. Aycock. Elberon 

W. H. Riggan, Vaughn 



A. P. Rodwell, Warren Plains .. 

John Rodgers, Warrenton 

J.C.Bartholomew, Louisburg.. 



115 

160 
130 

iOO.3 



130 
173 
13<i 

4375 



200 
12 



IOC 

150 
"i75 
■36b 

"260 
■12 



12 

75 
34 
54 

3!) 

52 
150 
100 
140 
230 
120 

G3 

"50 
120 



100 
36 
152 



50 



25 

55 

135 

175 

■■■71 



200 



250 



13S 
476 



860 

'■■56 
36 
360 
100 
360 
100 
300 



125 
50 
75 

■■47 

aw 

450 

i5379 



2562 



4 




Samaria 

Sandy Creek 

Sharon 

Social Plains 

So. Henderson... 

Sulphur Spfirs 

Vaufirhan 

Turkey Branch.. 
Warren Plains.. 

Warrenton 

White Level 


Littleton 

Louisburg- 

Macon 

Maple Sprinfirs... 
Marmaduke 

Midway 

Mountain Grove 

Mt. Hebron 

Mt. Herman 

Mt. Zion 

NewBf^thel 

New Sandy C'k.. 
No. Henderson.. 

Norlina 

Peach Tree 

Philadelphia 

Poplar SprinfiTS.. 

Quankie 

Red Bud 

Reedy Creek 

Roauoke Rapids 

Rock Springs 

Rosemary 


Cypress Chapel 

Enterprise 

Ephesus 

Gardners 

Harris Chapel.... 

Henderson 

John Chapel 

Joyners Chapel.. 
Kittrells 


or 

« 

; 8 

i K 


OO 

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lo 

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Advance 

Antioch 

Bear Swamp 

Bethesda 

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Browns 


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Pastors Salary 


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po 

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hrtff Q 3. 
t?H2B 



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ix> I caoOTbaoH^ 



I*. 05 03 Ul I-' 



ODOmi-'to: to 



Received by 

Baptism 



cs: toM*. 



Received by 



Ul 05 cn h- 1-1 1-- c 



Letter 



Restored 



l-'CC0tJtOMI-'l-'i<^ 



>*i-tOtC--C-JtCCIl 



5 "*-*!>-' l— 



Dismissed by 



Letter 



Excluded 



: M*.: I—: h-: 



oim — m: -ac-.: h^: m: ^sl-l: w 






Died 



K» o -a H" It CO CO 05 



fjicc I-* c^05-^oto^D 

- CO 05 O O tC CC 






cn : X tc ^j 05 Gc 



Sicn^ 



C-. o — c. CO ; cn *- i-i 00 CO to 
:/^x>:yicn: ir^ co oi -^ 4- x 



Males 



c^oc-^^^CJ^^*k•^c7l 

^Dcn^505 x^oci 



IXCJU-i-^CKCOCO-i 

:4-.co^^ cnOH-rf^ui 



O lO CC tc cn 



cn ■ -^ to o 
ffi : CO o ^s 



^ cp o *■ *• : cn cn to )-■ *■ to 



Females 



acnixoc 



CO to I-" I-" w lO CO 

H-c3-4C^uicntoc;io 

tOCS>^it-'XOl-'COCO 



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Total 



'X>.iototooji»-- 



h-<;oi|0 

C0l-'>*».l*>.>*>.lt^>*>.tOtO 



l-'h*.h-h-'^ 



to to 

4oijd 

t^.l^l^l^tOW 



Time of Preaching 



COtOCOl^it'tOtOCOCOX^COtO 



h-i 1-1 to H^ l-> 1-1 h 

§QcncnQxcnx<: 
ississs^ 



to to cn o cn 



^§88 



xptoocn 

8iei8 



8si 



Value of Church 
Property 



^05 1^05 CO toe 

5ooSSo2 



Uli^tOtnCOCOCTltOH 

SiS8S§8S? 



K^tOCOCJICO 

8iS88 



cototoc 
: Soot 



5O-05O1C 
3 O 'Jl Q C 
JOOOC 



Seating Capacity 






MINUTES 



OF THE I 



7l4/? River Association i 

1912 



IN ITS EIGHTY-SECOND SESSION 
Held With The Church 

AT RED BUD, FRANKLIN COUNTY, 

OCTOBER 8, 9 JO ,191 2 



Officers: Rev. G. M. Duke, Moderator, Maple ville, 



The nej:t session to he held ivith the Church at §3 
Warrenton on Tuesday after the Brst Sunday §> 
in October, 1913. 



To preach introductory set m on: Rev. W. O. 
Rosser: Alternate: Rev. W. M. Gihnore. ^ 



P 

c§ N. C. Rev. A. G. Wilcox, Clerk and Treasurer, §3 
I Brinklevville, N. C. ^S 



ORDER OF BUSINESS 

iUKSWAY A. M. 

11: Of Iiitroduetoiy sermon, organization and appointment ai 

Committees. 
12:30. Adjourn for dinner. 

TVKSKAY r. M. 

1:30. Suaday Schools. 

2:00. Temperance. 

2:30. Periodicals. 

3:00. Aged Ministers. 

3:30. Colportage. j 

3:45. Miscellaneous Business. 

4:00. Adjournment. 

8:00. Missionary Mass Meeting. 

WEO^iKSDAY A. M. 

9:00. Prayer Meeting. 

!t:30. Woman's Work. 

10:00. Orphanage. 

10:30. Associational Missions. 

12:00. Adjourn for dinner. 

wi;i)>;i>iiAv r. .\i. 

1:30. State Missions. 

2:1.5. Home Missions. 

3:00. F'oreign Missions. 

3:45. Miscellaneous Business. 

4:00. Adjournment. ♦ 

S:00. Systematic Beneficence. 

nirKSOAY A. M. 

;^:00. Prayer Meeting. 

11:30. Miscellaneous Business. 

10:00 Education. 
10:45. Afiscellaneous Business and Adiournnient. 



PASTORS AND POST OFFICES 



Bilbro, W. L. 
Bobbitt, N. W. 
Bunn, D. T. 
Coppege, G. W. 
Duke, G. M. 
Greggs, W. L. 
Gilmore, W. ^f. 
Harrell, A. B. 
Hartsell, Wallace 
tlogan, K. W. 
Hocutt, J. E. 
:May, G. W. 
^[cLeva, D. 
^lustian, A. P. 
Nelson, E. R. 
Sledge, J. W. 
Stamps, Mack. 
Taylor, T. J. 
Tuiistall, Geo. 
Willcox. A. G. 



-Middlesex. 

Littleton. 

Spring Hope. 

Henderson. 

^lapleville. 

Wake Foresr. 

Louisburg. 

Littleton 

Wake Forest. 

Wise. 

Nashville. 

Castalia. 

Whitakers. 

Wake Forest. 

Kittrell. 

Louisburg. 

Louisburg. 

Warrenton. 

Henderson. 

Brinkleyville. 



STANDING COMMITTEE 

.\i;('d Minister.s G. W. Coppedge 

Orphanage .J. R. Roawell 

I'due-atioii G. M. Beam 

Woman's Work L. W. Bagley 

Periodicals Hartswell Scarboro 

Sunday Schools J. M. Fulgium 

I'o reign Missions T. ,J. Taj'lor 

Associational Missions Ivey Allen 

Systematic Beneficence E. R. Nelson 

Tt^mperance R. W. Hogan 

1 lume ^Missions W. M. Gilmore 

AUDITOR 

W. B. Martin 

SUNDAY SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Thos. B. Wikler, E. L. Miller, .1. E. Allen. 

EDECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

T. .1. Tayloi-. (;. M. Duke, Ivey Allen, T. M. Petman, G. W. May. 

.1 . -M. Gardnei-. 



PROCEEDINGS 



lied iJud, Fraakliii County. 

Oetober 8th, l!n2. 

The pi.ulit\-s(H-()ii(l ;itiiiii;il session of the Tar River Asso- 
.'i;ition met with the cimreh here todtiy. According to appoinr- 
iiient. Brother G. 31. Duke preached the introductory sermon, 
ii'xt. Mark (i :87. Sermon being ended the Association was 
railed to order by the ^Moderator and i-()]l of churches was 
calh^d and deh'gates enrolled: 

Advancf. 

Auficch—]. R. Parker. Geo. R. Bennett. 

Hear Swamp — Exum ^Matthews. -T. AY. Bowers. Bat Crawjey. 

Betkesda—T. J. Watkins. 11. T. Norwood. 

B el hi rhi Ill—By letter. 

Brown's — [. AV. Southwick. 

[iH7m — I. A. Pippin, G. A. Alfoi-d. 

Cary Chapd — G. AA^. Boon. S. J. Bartholomew. AVm. Drake. 

Cedar Rocl-~T. II. Sledge, W. J. Stallings, J. T. Incoe. 

Corinth — R. D. Pernell, Lonnie Incoe. A. A. Dement. 

Cypress Chapel— M. L. Stallings, B. AVilder, Ula AA^ilder. 

^nferp/i<?^— Fletcher Bobbitt, AV. AV. Bobbitt. 

Ephesus~W. M. AVarner, L. M. Edwards. G. AA^. Coppedg(h 

Gardners — -R. D. AVright. 

riarriss Chapel— :]. R. AVollett. 

Henderson 

Jejhn's Chapel 

Joyners Chapel— J. B. Alford, P. II. Alassey. D. C. Penrce. 

Kittrell—E. R. Nelson. 

rAttleton—W. H. May, 11. J. Cardie. 

Louishurg — Ivey Allen, D. T. Smithwick. C. M. Cook. 

Macon — J. M. Colraan, H. A. Nicholson. Clyde Coleman. 

Meiple Springs — A. AV. Perry, H. J. Dennis. J. H. Uzzle. 

Meirmaduke—M. T. Duke, E. F. Aliller. 

Middlehcrg — J. L. Jackson. 

Ifidica]/ — AA". H. Lavton. Johnie AVester. K. R. Bowden. 



Mouiilaiii Grove. 

Me. Hebron — ]un AYililci". (leo. (jri'iffin, ^Tartiii (Tiiftei'. 

.1/^. Hernia)!. 

Mt. Zion—V\". T. Cooper. W. A. Burnett, C. U. Kcmiady. 

New Bethel— Ferry Ayscue. 0. E. Hicks. 

Xeiv Sandy Creek- — 8. P. Hicks. 

North Flenderson — \^. !>. CoJliiis. 

Norlina — W. J. James. J. AY. AcU-oek, K. S. Reyister. 

Peach Tree—^. C. Edwards. I). T. Bunn, W. H. Delbridgo. 

Philadelphia — ^C. P. Harper, Charles Parish, li. G. Leonard. 

Poplar Springs— W. H. Williams. C. T. Cheaves. 

Quanlai — By letter. 

lied Bud— J. L. Batehelor. C. C. :\lnrphy- John Wood. 

Reedy Creek— T. A. Harrison. B. P. Robertson. C. X. 
Riggan. 

Rcanohe Rapids — A. 0. ]\loore. M. M. Faisoi]. 

Rock Springs— T). V. Cheaves. Ellis StrieklaiM. 

Rosemary — A. 0. Moore. 

Samaria — AY. B. Bergeron. 

Sandy Creek— B. B. Collins. .1. K. Collins, D. M. Nelms. 

Sharon — K. W. Hogan. 

Social Plain.«—J. T. Alfoi'd. 

South Henderson. 

SulpJiur Springs — R. E. Limei'. IT. G. Limer. 

Vaughn — J. J. IMarshall. 

Turkey Branch — E. G. Lee. 

Warren Plains — -King. Thompson. 

WarreHfon—T. J. Taylor. 

White Level— D. B. Pearee, T. C. Collins, Luke May. 

The delegates being enrolled the Association was perma- 
nently organized by the selection of Brother G. M. Duke. 
-Aloderator. and A. G. Willeox Clerk and Treasurer. Thr 
Aloderator appointed a finance committee consisting of AV. M. 
Warren, C. H. Edwards, Luz Edwards. The Moderatoi- 
extended an invitation to visiting brethren and Brother Gai- 
ner, representing the Recorder, responded. New pastors 
«-oining since last session and Brother AValter M. Gilmon and 



K. W. Hogciu were weleunietl. Jiros. W. 0. Rosser and E. W. 
Shearin. of Roanoke Association, were recognized and wel- 
i-omed. A letter was granted Antioeh to join the Roanoke As- 
sociation. 

Tlie address of welcome was delivered b,y Brother T. S. 
< oUir and replied to by Brother G. W. May, after which the 
.Vssociatioii adjourned for dinner. Benediction by Brother T. 
J. Taylor. 

The Association re-convened at two o'clock. Devotional 
exercises led by Brother G. W. Coppedge. 

Tlie special order was taken up. The repoi't on Sunday 
Schools was presented by Brother J. W. Sledge. After 
discussion by brethren J. W. Sledge. W. ^L Gilmore and T. 
• (. Taylor, the report was adopted. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL REPORT 

The Sunday school work grows better with the passing of the 
years. We have learned to a marked degree how to secure a good 
average attendance. A wall of parents to hedge in the pupils in a 
Sunday school makes a good attendance safe and secure. 

But there are two questions of vital importance that confront 
us, namely: Are the Sunday schools doing their best work? If 
not, how may it be accomplished? 

Many Sunday schools have been running quite a number of years 
without showing much improvement in the grade of work being 
(lone. We attribute this condition to inefficient teaching. Many so- 
railed Sunday school teachers utterly fail to realize the great re- 
.sponsibility resting upon them as such. 

We recommend the grouping of churches so as to hold, occasion- 
ally, teacher training institutes. Also, we recommend that each 
Sunday school hold, each week, at a regularly set time and place, 
a teachers' meeting for the purpose of better preparing the les- 
sons to be taught. Respectfully submitted, 

J. W. Sledge. 

Following this was the report on Temperance, presented 
;iud discussed by Brother A. G. Willcox and G. W. May. No 
further discussion the report was adopted. 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE 

If I were called upon to mention the most prolific source of 
Trouble and sorrow that I have met in my sojourn here, I would 



say iutemperaine. Not only do %vives, mothers and children suffer 
from this monster sin, but the men themselves who are the vic- 
tims of intemperance are passing through a hell on earth. Recog- 
nizing the dignity and importance of the great cause of Temper- 
ance, let lis briefly consider the relation of the churches to that 
cause — the relation so intimately and inseparably connected with 
the very existence of our churches, that it is the relation of a 
thing to itself. Like health to the body, heat to fire, the churches 
and temperance rise and fall, succeed or fail, live or die together. 
Clearly, it is the duty of the churches growing out of this relation 
to be the warmest allies of the cause of temperance. 

We should be, first of all because of the teaching of the Bible 
on this subject. This is to be our guide, our chart. Hear what the 
Book says: "Look not thou upon the wine when it is red, when it 
giveth its color in the cup, etc. At last it biteth like a serpent and 
stingeth like an adder." "Woe tinto them that rise up early in 
the morning" that they may follow strong drink, that tarry late 
into the night until wine inflame them." And again, "Woe unto 
him that givest his neighbor drink, that addest thy venom thereto, 
and makest him drunken also." Nor is this all, for the Bible plain 
ly declares that "no drunkard shall inherit the kingdom of God." 
Truly it is a cause — God's cause, our cause, if we are true to th- 
principles of our religion. Our Master says: "Ye are the light of 
the world," etc. Nothing so dims our light or darkens our way as 
intemperance. Again, "Ye are the salt of the earth." Foreign Mis- 
sions is to purify and preserve the morals of the world. Brethren, 
let our attitude be toward this enemy of the state and nation, to- 
wards wives and children of drunken husbands and fathers, towards 
the criminals in our jails and penitentiary, the demented creatures 
in our lunatic asylums, the dreviling idiots and raving madmen, the 
paupers of our poorhouses, old before their time, water-eyed and 
decrepid through drink, and of the numbers who lie buried in the 
potters field, let it be war to the knife and knife to the hilt. Let 
us unite our aims and efforts with the powers to be to stamp out 
the iniquitous "blind tiger" traffic, and to bring to justice those 
who violate our prohibition laws. The thing must die, because it 
is accursed of God. 

Respectfully submitted, A. (J. Willcox 

The report on the Orphauage was presented by Brother 
Thomas H. Sledge and discussed by Brother C. M. Cooke, 
after which a collection was taken amounting to it>18.13. On 
motion the report was adopted. 



8 

REPORT ON ORPHANAGE 

The Tliomasville Orphanage is now the "pet" of the Tar River 
Association and of the Baptist hosts of the state. We love the Or- 
]>hanage because of the great work it has done and is now doing in 
giving to the needy ones food, raiment and shelter, and a very su- 
])erior training of the head, hand and heart. We respect the Or- 
phanage for the sincerity of its officials, for its high ideals, and 
for its ever widening influence and power. 

As a rule, those who have gone from its doors are a blessing to 
The state. Many are now in high schools and colleges, and give 
jiromise of attaining unto greatness. 

It is our duty as Baptists to give largely of our means to free 
the institution from debt. Let us rally our forces for this emer- 
gency, especially on next Thanksgiving Day. 

The charitable gift to the Orphanage, of an estate valued at 
$100,000.00, by Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy, opens wider the door of 
opportunity for rendering service. Let us remember that to rightly 
appreciate and develop this vast estate makes our giving to the 
institution more imperative. 

Respectfully submitted, T. H. Sledge. 

The report on Aged Ministers, prepared by H. A. Nichol- 
son, was read and discussed by K. W. Hogan. Cash collec- 
tion amounting to $8.49 was taken. 

The board for the relief of aged and infirm Baptist ministers 
and their widows was organized by the Baptist State Convention 
twenty-two years ago. During this period, although contributions 
have been small, the Board has aided a goodly number of aged 
ministers and the widows of ministers, and thus saved from want 
some who otherwise would have suffered for the necessities of life. 

If the churches had furnished the means a much larger work 
would have been done; and the churches would have furnished the 
necessary means if pastors had been careful to call their attention 
10 the work. 

There are now nearly forty beneficiaries receiving help from 
this Board. They receive from $40 to $200 a year, according to 
their necessities. Others are in need of help but the Board cannot 
receive them without reducing the amount that it now gives to its 
l)eneficiaries, unless a larger number of our churches unite in this 
work. 

The Board is very particular about whom it receives, and no one, 
is received as a beneficiary unless he has been engaged in minis- 
terial work five years previous to his application, and is endorsed by 
Ins pastor and the Moderator and the Executive Committee of his 



Association. Therefore, the churche.s may rest assured that those 
whom they are called upon to helj) are not only needy, but are 
worthy. 

It is gratifying to know thaT, our people are becomliig more 
deeply interested in this work. More churches than formerly are 
contributing and the contributions are becoming larger. At the 
Tar River Association in 1910 only IS churches reported contribu- 
rions to the relief of aged ministers. In 1911 27 churches reported 
■ontributions to this work, and I hope that a still larger number 
•ontributed this year. We must not be satisfied until every church 
ill our Association sends at least one contribution a year to Walters 
Durham, Raleigh, N. C, for the relief of aged ministers. To this. 
end let the pastors and delegates bring this work before their 
respective churches and secure a contribution at the first meeting 
:ifter the adjournment of the Association. Remember the saying 
i)f the Master, "'Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least 
f)f these my brethren, ye have done ir unto me," 

H, A. NiCHOLSo.N, 

Report ado])ted. 

Resolved, That the pastors of Tar River Associatjon he urgentl> 
requested to take a collection for Aged Ministers in each of tbeir 
ihiirches. at some time as siear Christmas as tJie,F caB. 

I,. AXLEN,, 

The jMuderator appointed G. W. Coppedge, W. O. Rosser. 
iiid Arek Perry a committee o)i time, place and preacher. 

The claims of the Biblica,) Recorder were urged by Broth- 
vr Gardner. 

The foUowlng resoljition ivxis offered by T. J. Taylor was. 
t ilopted t 

Resolved, That a committee of three be appointed to prepare 
a permanent order of business for future ^essSoas of this body and! 
report during this sesclon, and that tlie clerk be instructed to pub- 
lish tbis order of business in Biblical Recorder one mo.nth previous 
70 the assixmal aessloc of this Assoclatioiii. 

WEDNESDAY 9 130 

Prayer service, led by Brother Hogan. Miinutes of yester 
];iy read and approved. 

BrotJjer .Morton read report on AVoman's: Work ami 



10 

(li'^cussrct i1. ;iii(l l)i-(>1hcr Tayldi* otifciTd llic follnwinc: resb'lu- 
tion : 

Resolved, That tlie Executive Committee be iDstructed to pro- 
vide for the traveling expenses of Sister I>. W. Boyle while visiting 
the churches in the interest of woman's work, provided they havi* 
sufficient funds to justify it. 

WOMAN'S WORK 

Twentx years ago the subject of woman's work was looked upon 
with decided misgivings. To mention the subject on the floor 
of this body was to take the risk of precipitating a heated, not to 
say an unfiiendly, discussion, involving the question of woman's 
preaching. 

It was during such a discussion, just twenty years ago today, 
while this body was in session at Louisburg, that it was known by 
Miss Fannie Heck through Dr. R. T. Vann, that the women did not 
want to preach — they only asked to be allowed to serve God in their 
own quiet way. 

This modest request from her put an end to the discussion at 
once, and the work has moved on so quietly and steadily that many 
of us have never realized how vast and important this work has 
become. So discreet and judicious has been their leadership that 
their achievements seem like a dream. We can scarcely realize that 
;i small handful of our sisters in their organized work, has become 
one of the most potent factors in the work of the Kingdom. 

Year by year they have steadily increased in numbers and in 
efflciency. until now they number (including the Young Women's 
Auxiliaries, the Sun Beams and the Royal Ambassadors) nearly 
40,000, and they gave last year more than $32,000, or one-third the 
whole amount given by the entire denomination for Missions. This 
is a vivid illustration of what can be done by systematic and intel- 
ligent elfort. 

This is indeed a fine showing, but by no means the most im- 
portant part of their work. They study missions and thus in- 
form themselves as to the fields and their needs, and then they 
impart this information to others. Thus, by creating a mission 
sentiment in the home from which are to come future missionaries 
and supporters of missions, they are making their largest contribu- 
lion to the cause of worldwide evangelization. Let the good work 
■io on until the kingdom has been brought nigh to the perishing 
millions. W. B. Morton, 

i: Committee. 

REPORT OF PRESIDENT OF W. M. U. AUXILIARY 

The eighth annual session of the W. M. V. of the 'Tar River Asso- 



elation convened with the Gardner's Baptist Church in' Warren 
lounty, on the L'ljtli and liTth of September, 1912. 

There are forty organizations — 2'> W. M. S, 4 Y. W. A.'s, and 11 
Sunbeam Bands in the Association. Less than half of these seni 
messengers, though there were twenty five delegates enrolled. To- 
tal contributions for the year amounted to $8i")8.5.5, which is nearlx 
titty per cent, increase over that of last year. Our financial aim 
for the coming year is $961.00. 

Reports for the most part were gratifying, showing progres.s 
in many of the departments of our work. The papers and open 
discussions were helpful and uplifting. 

It was our good fortune to have with us our State Corresponding 
Secretary of W. M. U., Miss Blanche Barrns, who greatly encouraged 
and instructed us in her address on, "W. M. U. Outlook," and 
"The Conference foi' Missionary Workers;" Miss Lula Dickson, Sec- 
letary of Meredith College Alumnae Association, who made a strong 
appeal for the training of our young people in an inspiring presen- 
tation of Y. W. A. work; Rev. W. M. Gilmore, of Louisburg, who 
preached a strong sermon Thursday evening; and Rev. W. N. John- 
ston, of Wake Forest, who emphasized the importance of Woman's 
Work in an able address on Friday evening. 

The following officers were unanimously elected for the coming 
year: — President, Mrs. L. W. Bagley, of Littleton, N. C; Vice-Pres- 
ident, Mrs. W. W. Parker, of Henderson, N. C; Secretary-Treasurer, 
Miss Mamie Coleman, of Macon, N. C. 

The Union decided to appoint a committee of one in each of the 
lour unions in our Association to have charge of program, and ar- 
I ange for a Woman's Meeting in connection with the fifth Sunda>- 
Fnion Meeting. 

It is -the purpose of the L'nion to make special efforts to enlist 
ihe young people of our churches in organized mission work — en- 
deavoring thus, and by our prayers, means and personal service to 
make a "triumphant year" in the Lord's work. 

As CO workers with you in His vineyard, we earnestly desire the 
support and prayers of the Tar River Association. 

Respectfully submitted 

Mrs. L. W. Bagley, 
\ '\, Pres. W. M. V. Tar River Association. 

FINANCIAL REPORT OF W. M. U. 

Advance ...... $ 1 . 0'> 

Bear Swamp , 5. 00 

Browns . 16.05 

Corinth ,, 5.0i» 

Gardners ... .i....... 55 10 



Henderson 167.:J^J 

loyners Chapel 10. oT. 

Kittrell .* 17 . 4(i 

Littleton 176. f»7 

Uonisburg 62.88 

Macon 12. 3(» 

ASiddlebiiirg 46 . 2(» 

Munson 5 . 7r. 

Mt. Zion 6.50 

V(-!i- Bethel . , 4 . 00 

N'orth Hendeison v 5.2.' 

Peach Tree 4 . 3^^ 

Poplar Spring 12.51 

Koanoke Rapids 18.80 

Rosemary 5.7;' 

South Henderson 8 . 00 

Sandy Creek ,. 22. 0(* 

Shat-QH , 5 . 4(» 

Vaughan 21 . 81' 

Warrenton , 153 . 20 

Warren Plains 9.5(« 

ToiMl . . .1858.5?. 

This resolution with the report was adopted. 
The siTthjeet of Periodicals was presented by Brother 6il- 
Tuore, who offered the i-eport, the same being adopted. 

PERIODICALS 

Knowledge is power. To add large numbers to our Baptist rank."- 
(vho can not intelligently and sympatheticany co-operate with us„ 
means weakness rather than strength. We ought, therefore, to. 
give the heartiest support to those agencies that are seeking to 
i^nlightea and uait'y our forces. Chief among these ageacies Is the 
'Biblical Recorder." *)f Raleigh, which has for more than thret 
ijuarters of a century stood loyally by every cause fostered' 
by Qur denomioatfon. It has beeia the faithful expoaent of the 
rruth as Baptists see it. and wherever it has gone it has produced: 
a brgader aud a more virile type of church membership. It is- 
rhe one medium through which North Carolina Baptists can keep iru 
touch with each «ther. 

We heartily commend also "Charity and Children," the ©rgara 
-Tf our Thomasville Orphanage, whose pages fairly sparkle everv- 
week with bright and pungent truths. 

"The Foreign Mission .lournal," of Richmond, Va., organ of our 
foreign Mission Board, and. "The Home Field,." of Atlanta. Ga.. 



IJi 

organ of our Home Mission Board, ai-e inexpensive monthly mag- 
azines, and are indispensable helps to every Southern Baptist who 
desires to make his lite count for most in the Kingdom of God. 

We recommend also for use in our Sunday schools the literature 
gotten out by our Sunday School Board, of Xashville, Tenn., which 
is equal to the very best on the marlvet. 

Your <'ommittee would modestly suggest to pastors, who arc 
not already doing so, that to interest their people in the readin? 
of these periodicals would greatly add to the effectiveness of their 
worl^ and to the enlargement of the Kingdom of our Redeemer. 

Walter M. Gilmoke. 

The hour for Associational ^lissions having arrived thi' 
report, with the report of the Exeeutive Conunittee, was 
i>lfered by Brothei- Ivey ADen. 

REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. INCLUDING THE REPORT 
ON ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONS 

Since the beginning of the missionary work of the Tar Rivei' 
Association within its own boundaries the Lord has given to is 
the seal of His divine ai)proval, by constantly enlarging the terri 
tory and increasing the willingness of the churches to meet it? 
demands; also constantly increasing the churches under the labors 
of the missionaries, until it seemed to be necessary for the Asstf- 
''.iation to divide into two pai'ts. 

Since the division the old Tar River has been steadily contrib- 
uting to the destitution within its own borders and there is 
constantly increasing needs for yet greater sacrifices on our parr 
to meet the demands vhat are upon us. 

The Executive Committee has tried to make the wisest possiblt^ 
use of the funds submitted to it for distribution and at its meet- 
ing in November, 1911, the following appropriations were made: 

Bethesda , $ 50 . OC* 

Kittrell ..... 150.00 

.Mt. Hermon . 75 . 00 

North and South Henderson 75.00 

Norlina 75 . 00 

Rosemary and Roanoke Rapids 300. Od 

Vicksboro . 35 . Od 

Alsop's Chapel 35 . 0<t 

1 nez .... 85 . 0(» 

B.2sides these points Brother Sledge and Brother Duke have 
been doing some very effective work on their own responsibility. 
Brother Sledge at Gold Valley in Nash county where the Lord 



14 

has been with him and blessed him in this work, giving him 
twelve souls for his hire. This point is five miles from any other 
Baptist church, in a good community and the prospects seem good 
for building up a strong church at this point. At Centreville Broth- 
er Duke has been preaching from time to time, as opportunity af- 
forded and this work bore fruits in the conversion of ten persons 
and the indications are that we will have to continue the work 
at this point also, and possibly put a church there. 

After addresses 1)y brethren C. ]\I. Cooke and W. W. Bob- 
bitt, the roll of the churches was called and the following 
amounts pledged : 

Henderson $ 175 . 00 

Louisburg 175 . 00 

Maple Spring ; :75.00 

Warrenton _ 75 . 00 

Browns , 60.00 

New Bethel 50.00 

Turkey Branch 50 . 00 

Philadelphia 45 . 00 

Sandy Creek 42.50 

Castalia 40.00 

Macon 40 . 00 

Samaria 40 . 00 

Cedar Rock ....... ^...- V .....:............ 35.00 

Harriss Chapel .' 35.00 

Poplar Springs '. . . . : . : ; . . 30 . 00 

Cypress Chapel . . . , 27 . 50 

Red Bud . . : 25.00 

Sharon !....: 25.00 

Warren Plains ■ ; . : . . 26 . 00 

Bear Swamp .....:..' 25.00 

Bunn 25 . 00 

Cary Chapel 25 . 00 

C. M. Cooke 25.00 

Bethesda 20 . 00 

Gardner's 20.00 

Mt. Zion 22 . 00 

Peach Tree 20.00 

Rock Spring 20.00 

Sulphur Springs 20 . 00 

Ferthing Creek 20.00 

Middleburg 17 . 50 

Enterprise 16 . 00 

Reedy Creek 16 . 00 



1.") 

Mannadnke 17 . 50 

Bethlehem 15. On 

.loyner's Chapel 15.00 

Norlina 15 . 00 

South Henderson 15 . 00 

V'aughn 12.00 

Midway . 12 . 00 

Quankie 11 . 0»> 

Kittrell 10 . 00 

Mt. Hebron 10 .Od 

White. Level 10.00 

Social Plains 8 . 00 

Mt. Herman 5 . 00 

New Sandy Creek 5 . 00 

Peach Tree W. M. S 5.00 

B. B. Collins and wife 10.00 

[nez . 10.00 

Vicksboro 5 . 00 

Warrenton W. M. S 5 .00 

Warrenton Sunbeams 5.00 

Middleburg W M S 2.25 

D. B. Pearce 5 . 00 

Cedar Rock W. M. S 3 . 00 

Fishing Creek W. M. S 5.0(t 

Cash, Philadelphia 1.00 



Total $1,608.50 

The 'report was adopted. 
Adjourned for dinner. 

WEDNESDAY. 1:30 ■■ ■ ^ ' ■■ 

The Associatiop met and was led in prayer by Brother 
Xelson: Brother Arch Johnson, representing the Orphanage, 
was wehiomed by the ^Moderator. The church at Fishing was 
received by letter from Roanoke Association, and Moderator 
gave the right hand of fellowship to delegates W. W. Rosser, 
Bennie Saunders, John Ward. Roanoke Rapids and Rosemary 
were granted letters to join Roanoke Association. 

Repbrt on State Missions was read by Brother Hogan and 
discussed by brethren TTogan and Tunstall. 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS 

' We speak of State Missions for the sake of definition, and it is 



1« 

well t'hat we should. All missions are one. It is just as imper- 
ative that we give to all as it is is that we give to any. None 
i)f us have much admiration for a dwarf, or abnormal development, 
and especially is this true when such d-evelopment is backward. We 
look at the stunted pig, calf, colt, or body, it may be, with the pain 
of regret. We sow our grains in well tilled and fertilized soils and 
look for a rich harvest. We are sorely disappointed when we fail 
to reap the expected harvest. How is is when we are under the 
scrutiny of the all-seeing eye of our Heavenly Father? The best 
way, of w;hich I know anything, for lessening the abnormal 
-rrowth backward in church work and church life is to give willing- 
ly, cheerfully, and liberally to missions. 

And for systematical growth State Missions occupies the first 
and foremost place. Tarry ye in the old home church until ye be 
endued with power from above, and ye shall preach the gospel in 
the old North State, and the old North State sliall became a center 
of such power and Christ-like influence that the whole world 
will be blessed thereby. 

I was much impressed by some words that came from the 
versatile pen of our blessed corresponding secretary, Livingston 
Johnson. 

I quote: 

SO.\t£ SPECn ir REStnLTS OF LAST YEAR'S WORK 

1. Fruit of the faithful preaching of the Word. There were 35] 
points supplied, 228 meetings held, 2,832 professions of faith, 1,921 
baptisms, and 1,427 added by letter. 

2. Church Buildings. There were fifty-five church houses being 
built last year and fourteen finished. Of these, eight received aid 
from the building fund contributed by the women — five thousand dol 
lars appropriated in this way, ranging in sums from one hundred 
10 seven hundred dollars. 

3. Financial showing. These mission points contributed to the 
support of their pastors, $525,432.05; to church building, $32,510.51; 
to the objects of the convention, $10,721.96 — a grand total of 
.?<)8,664.58. We expended in the work of State Missions last year 
.$46,531.01. The mission points paid back to the denomination 
.?22,133.47 more than we expended in State Missions last year. If 
you deduct the amount they paid for the support of their pastors, 
und count only the money which they put in church buildings, which 
adds to our permanent denominational wealth, and their contribu- 
rions to the objects of the Convention, the mission points came -with- 
in $2,898.48 of paying us back every cent that we invested in State 
.Misslons last year. 

We see from these specified results that State Missions is a 
wonderfully paying proposition We cannot possibly invest out 



17 

niouey in au> euterpi-itie in tbe state that will yield richer resultt^. 
Let us give ourselves heartily to the tasiv of State Missions that our 
state may become the greatest possible center of gospel influence. 

K. W. HooA^i, Committee. 

After this pledges wci-c Diatlc lo hiiildiiis' (>f Norliiia cimrcit 
.IS follows : 

Bethesda $ 10 . Ou 

Browns 10 . 00 

Cary Ghapel 25 . 00 

Castalia 5 . 00 

Cedar Rock 5 . Oo 

Corinth 5 . 00 

Louisburg 20 . Ou 

Macon / 10 . 00 

Marmaduke 5 . 0(i 

Mt. Hebron 2.50 

Mt. Zion 5.00 

Xorlina 1 . 00 

Poplar Spring ^.00 

Red Bud 5 . 00 

Samaria 5 . 0(' 

Sandy Creek 5 .00 

Warren Plains 10 . 00 

Warreuton 50 . Oti 

I'ishing Creek 2 . ott 

Total $186.00 

The report was adopted. 

Brother Ivey Allen read the report on Home Missions and 
it was discussed by Brother Gilmore. 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS 

The activities of our Home Mission Board are possibly more 
varied than those of any of the other of our boards. 

The work among mill people, for foreign immigrants, with the 
negroes, in the mountain sections, among the Indians, and on the 
frontier has been enlarged upon and emphasized so frequently 
that it ought to be familiar to every Baptist. In addition to these 
there is the large and profitable work of twenty-nine mission schools 
in the mountain sections, fostered and cared for by this board. 

The special evangelistic work of this board, recently organized, 
has been blessed with wonderful results. The last report of the 



. Hoaid, giving tlie work for the fiscal yeai', ending with last April, 
showed 3,739 converts baptized, and (183 volunteers for the ministry 
and mission work. 

Another department of work of this board is building of church 
houses. There are within the sphere of operations of this board 
3,000 or more churches without houses of worship, where only suit- 
able buildings are needed to build np strong organizations that will 
soon become centers of Baptist influence and sentiment. 

The Southern Baptist Convention has instructed the Home Board 
to take steps for the raising of a $1,000,000 church building loan 
fund, and tlie Board is arranging to make special efforts to this end, 
within the next three years. Another great work, probably the great- 
est yet put upon this board by the Convention is the enlisting, train- 
ing and developing of "backward" churches. Then there is the pub- 
lishing of "Our Home Field," the official organ of this board, and 
the printing of thousands of tracts, stimulating interest in Missions. 

The receipts for this work in 1912 were $366,050. The work 
projected for the year ending April 30th, 1913, is on a basis of 
$412,000, which is the amount the churches of the Southern Baptist 
Convention are asked to contribute this year. 

Thus is this board leading us into a large and still larger place. 
Every church should be glad to follow, — first, by keeping thoroughly 
informed on the needs and results of the work. Read "Our Home 
l<"'ie)d," a splendid Mission magazine sent to subscribers at 35 cents 
a year, and in clubs of five or more at 25 cents a year. By securing 
and .carefully reading the various instructive tracts sent, by the 
board for the asking. By earnest prayer, by liberal contributions, 
by a constant cultivation of a broad Mission spirit. 

The following resolution was adopted: 

Resolved, That the churches of this Association undertake to 
laise, during the ensuing associational year, one thousand dollars 
lor Home Missions. 

The report was adopted. 

The report on Foreign Missions was read by Brother Ta>- 
lor, who spoke to the report, and offered the following reso- 
lution : 

Resolved. That the Executive Committee be instructed to appoi- 
tion the fifteen hundred dollars asked for Foreign Missions amon^ 
the churches of the Association, and submit the apportionment to 
the churches for their action. 

Committee on Time. Place and Preacher for next session 

report as follows : 



U) 



J-'laee — ^^■ai■l■eaI()ll. 

Time — Tuesday after ttrst Sunday in October, 1913. 

To preafli iritroduftory sermon — W. O. Rosser; alternate, W. M. 
(iilmore. 

Finance ('oininitlec offeivd theii- report as follows: 

Associational Missions $1132.6". 

State Mssions 15 . 90 

Home Missions 7 . 9-^ 

l''oreign Missions 16.9-'. 

Aged Ministers 4.2.", 

Orphanage o6 . 51 

Minutes 79.21 

Sunday Schools > lO.Od 

Total .$1303 . 42 

W. M. Wakuex, 
L. M. Edwakds, 
S. C. EnwAKDS, 

Committee 

Brother Allen, 'rivasurer nt Kxcciitive Committee, oft'ered 
his report, wliieh was audited and found correct and adopted. 



'I'o 


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EPORT OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

hand October 3, 1911 

Henderson Ch. lor Ministerial Education.. 
Cedar Rock Ch. for Ministerial Education . . 

Macon Ch. for Ministerial Education 

Peach Tree Ch. for Ministerial Education.. 
Mt. Zion Ch. for Ministerial Education . . . . 
Bear Swamp Ch. for Ministerial Education 
Vaughan Ch. for Ministerial Education. . 

Bunn Ch. for Ministerial Education 

Maple Springs Ch. for Ministerial Education 
Bethlehem Ch. for Ministerial Education . . 
Red Bud Ch. for Ministerial Education.. 
Harris Chapel Ch. for Ministerial Education 
Antioch Ch. for Ministerial Education . . . . 
Sandy Creek Ch. for Ministerial Education 
Quankey Ch. for Ministerial Education . . 
Corinth Ch. for Ministerial Education . . . . 
Poplar Springs Ch. for Ministerial Education 
Midway Ch. for Ministerial Education .... 
Warrenton Ch. for Ministerial Education . . 
Enterjjrise Ch. for Ministerial Education . . 



$169 
25 



.11 
.0(« 
.00 
.0(» 
.00 
.97 
.00 
.0(» 
.07 
.35 
.00 
. 00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.40 
.65 
.00 
.55 
.00 
.00 



20 

To Anit. from Sulphur Springs Ch. for Ministerial Education .j.ui* 

To Amt. from Samaria Ch. for Ministerial Education 5.00 

To Amt. from Norlina Ch. for Ministerial Ednr-ation 1.76 

To Amt. from Careys Chapel Ch. for Ministerial Education 5.00 

To Amt from .loyners Chapel Ch. for Ministerial Education ?,.0i^ 

To Amt. from Philadelphia Ch. for Ministerial Education .. 3.fiU 

To Amt. from Castalia Ch. for Ministerial Education 3.67 

To Amt. fi'oni New Bethel Ch. for Ministeriial Education . . 8.8:-J 

To Amt. from Browns Ch. for Ministerial Education ...... 10.00 

To Amt. from Interest 3.70 

Total $339. 5!» 

Ry Amt. paid W. R. Cullom for Student Aid Fund, Wake 

Forest College 53. On 

Hy Amt. paid B, Presley Smith for Student Fund at Seminary 150.00 



263.00 



Balance on hand October 7t.b, 1912 $136.59 

Examined and found correct - W. B. Morton. 

Brother May made a motion that in future, churches be 
i-t;quested to send only Associational Missions and Minutes 
funds to the Association, and that all other moneys be sent to 
the objects tor which they are designed. 

Ad.iourninent. Avith prayer by Brother Nelson. 

THURSDAY, 9 :30 

The Association reassembled and praise so'viee was led by 
I brother Reggan. 

Brother Taylor offered the iollowing resolution, whicli 
w as adopted : 

Resolved, That a committee of fv^.- be appointed to report 
next year on the improA'ement of the order of buisness. 

Brother J. J. Marshall, Associational Colporter, ottered his 
report, which was adopted. 

During the past year of this Association, the writer has visited 
sixteen churches, supplied one mission point regularly, preached 
tifty-one sermons, organized one Sunday school at Vicksburg, and 
witnessed the conversion of twenty- two persons. 

I have also u&ed every opportunity to place before our people 



21 

i^ood litt'rature, havinj? sold fortj'-two Bibles, one hundred and forty- 
three New Testaments, aud oue hundred and thirteen other volumes 
of valuable religious literature, and given away two thousand de 
nominational and religious tracts, thereby endeavoring to implan' 
in the hearts of men and women the Kingdom of God. 

In regard to renunieration for my efforts, I have I'ealized protir 
on books. $115.1 (>, voluntary contributions. $42.70, received from 
Mission Board .$50.00. Total, $207.86. 

Respectfully submitted, .1. .J. Marshall. 

Brother Ilogan otfercd the followiiij^ resolntjon. which was 
adopted ; 

Resolved That the Clerk be instructed to print one thousand 
copies ot fhe Minutes of the Association and receive the usual com- 
pensation for his faithful service. 

The t'oljowing resolution, presented by Brotlier E. R. Kel- 
son, was adopted : 

In view of the pressing need at Wake Forest of a house of 
worship that will be adequate to, and worthy of, both the Baptisl;- 
of the town and increasing number of students in Wake Forest Col 
lege; and in view of the fact that the Baptists of Wake Foresi 
are not financially able to build such a house, but are sacrificiuf; 
ro raise half the necessary amount and appealing to the denomi- 
nation at large to contribute the balance; therefore, be it resolved 
by the Tar Rivei' Association, that we urge upon the pastors xo 
take offeiings in their churches and send to the Building Commit- 
tee of Wake Forest within the next year. 

Brother T. J. Taylor was eleeled Associational Foreign Mis- 
sion ary representative. 

The following- was otl:'ered by Brother May. which was 
ado[)ted : 

Resolved, That the colportage work be made a permanent pan 
of the Tar River Association, and that the Executive Committet^ 
be instructed to appropriate at least $50 to that work. 

Resohition of thanks offered by Brother May was heartily 
adopted. 

R.esolved, That the thanks of the Association be extended to 
the church at Red Bud for their cordial hospitality. 

Brother T. J. Tayloi- presented the following, which was 
adopted : 



22 

Resolve, That in the future no ap]>ropriation be made by th-e Exe- 
'Utive Committee except by the Committee as a whole, when in 
session. 

Treasurer of the Association oftered his report, which, af- 
ter being audited and found correct, was adopted. It was 
ordered by the body that of the $20 remaining in the treasiir\ 
unexpended that A. G. Willcox have $10 and Brother Buiin 
$10 for work on their respective fields. 

Brother Bunn made statement of work on his field and 
received from the brethren $16 to help on building. 

Brother T. J. Taylor was elected delegate to Southern Bap- 
list Convention, and brethren G. M. May, H. W. Hogau and 
E. R. Nelson to Baptist State Convention. Brethren G. M. 
Duke and A. G. Willcox were appointed paternal messengers 
to Roanoke Association. 

The hour for Report on Education having arrived the report 
was read by Brother ]\Iay. Professor Sykes, of "Wake Forest, 
lieing present, discussed in a masterful way the subject of 
education, after which the report was adopted. 

REPORT ON EDUCATION 

Education is the training of man's faculties to their highest de- 
gree of efficiency. The final test of education is its effect on man's 
actions and from the heart come the issues of life, and consequently 
through the pioper training of the mind are we to reach propei 
heart action. 

We should co-operate with all forces to produce a generation 
that will be stronger mentally, morally and spirittially. In order to 
accomplish this we must give the child more attention. For the 
next few years we need to stress elementary education, in order that 
■.ve may learn its needs and better its conditions. 

1. We want larger opportunities from all sources, for the bet- 
terment of our elementary and preparatory schools. 

We need better conditions along the line of child labor in our 
manufacturing centers. 

We need and must have compulsory education, for we have many 
jmrents who will not give their children a chance unless forced by 
law. 

The above suggestions presuppose that our church is interested 
in what kind of social and civic life we have in our state, as well 
as moral and spiritual life. When the above conditions are met 



•we may begin sijecial iraiuing without fear of beioming top-heav> 
md losing the aid of the masses. 

Our ministry should be trained so that they may meet the grow 
ng demand for culture and be able to meet the arguments of error 
is it comes. The minister is not only a leader of religious thought 
and action, but he should be so broadly trained that he may, dis 
)assionately and without prejudice enter into the thought and actiou 
if his generation for hel]j. 

This age, as those of the past, look to the church for it.^ 
ideals and standard of action, and the church has no higher ideals 
or standard of action than the ministry holds up to it year after 
year. Therefore, the church should hold up the hands of the 
Board of Education at Wake Forest. Meredith, Oxford, Chowan 
Baptist Female Colleges- and arrange a couse of study in our 
(ireparatory schools that will be in line with our higher institution'-- 
of learning. G. W. May. 

The following was offered, which was so ordered: 
Resolved, That the Treasurer of the Association be instructed t<> 
!urn over to .Mr. Ivey Allen, Treasui'er of Executive Committee, all 
funds coming into his hands for Associational Missions. 
Finance Committee of last year re-appointed. 
The business of the body being finished, the Moderator 
made some tender, touching parting words. Brother Taylor 
prayed earnestly for the blessing of God to come and be upon 
us. and to use us for the building of the Kingdom at home and 
abroad. "Blest be the tie that binds" was sung and the part- 
ing hand was taken, and the Moderator declared the Asso- 
ciation adjourned to meet with the church in "Warrenton fwi 
Tuesday after first Sunday in October, 1913. 

G. W. Duke, Moderator. 

0. G. WiLLCOx, Cl'k and Treas. 

REPORT OF TREASURER 

RFXEIl'TS 

To Ami. due Association at last session $ 3.0J 

To Amt. received from Finance Com. for Asso. Miss 694. 2?! 

To Amt. received from Louishurg Ch. for Asso. Miss 150. 9U 

To Amt. received from Roanoke Rapids for Asso. Miss 37.00 

To Amt. received from Enterprise Cb. for Asso. Miss 15.00 

To Amt. received fromMt. Hebron Ch. for Asso. Miss 10.00 

To Amt. received from Philadelphia Ch. for Asso. Miss 30.0(i 

To Amt. received from Marmaduke Ch. for Asso. Miss 10.00 



24 

To Amt. received from Finance Com. for State Mias 5i>.0."> 

To Amt. received from Finance Com. for Home Miss 6.70 

To Amt. received from Finance Com, for Foreign Miss. .. 16.25 

To Amt. received from Finance Com. for S. S. Miss 1.00 

To Amt. received from Finance Com. for Minister'! Educa. 4.50 

To Amt. received from Finance Com. for Minister'! Relief 9.71 

ro Amt. received from Finanoe Com. for Orphanage .... 15.62 

Casli collection for aged ministers 10.00 

("asli collection for Orphanage 12.64 

Lotiisburg, for Mlinutes 3 . 00 

Koanolve Rapids, for Minutes 1.40 

Enterprise, for Minutes 1.00 

Alt. Hebron, for Minutes 2.00 

Philadelphia, for Minutes 2.50 

Henderson, for Minutes ■ 3 . 00 

Rosemary, tor Minutes 1 . 00 

Marmaduke, for Minutes 1 . 25 

Finance Committee, for Minutes 60.70 

Total $1161 . IS 

Examined and found correct. 

W. B. Morton. 

mSBX:i{SEME>^TS 

By Amt. paid Walters Durham for State Miss $ 53.05 

By Amt. paid Walters Durham for Home Miss 6.70 

By Amt. paid Walters Durham for Foreign Miss 16.25 

By Amt. paid Walters Durham for S. S. Miss 1.00 

By Amt. paid Walters Durham for Ministerial Bdu 4.50 

B^ Amt. paid Walters Durham for State Education S37.00 

By Amt. paid Walters Durham for Ministerial Relief .... 9.71 

By Amt. paid Walters Durham, cash call, Ag'd Min 10.00 

By Amt. paid M. L. Kester, cash call, Orphanage 12.64 

By Amt. paid M. L. Kester, Finance Com., Orphanage .... 15.62 

By Amt. paid M. L. Kester, printing Minutes 55.00 

By Amt. paid A. G. Willcox for Inez church 50.00 

By Amt. paid T. .J. Taylor, expenses, tent, etc., Inez 9.35 

By Amt. paid J. W. Little for work at Inez 7.00 

Clerk fee 25 . 00 

Expenses 2 . 50 

Paid G. T. Tunstall for Norlina 25.00 



Total $1140.32 

To balance due Association $ 20.96 



•Jo 

Bruther Wil./ox has been iireaching ai Alsoi)'« Chapel aud luez. 
He reports progress at Alsop's Chapel. At Inez he had a very gracious 
nieetiug- in whi<-h there were many conversions and he expected on 
the third Sunday in November to organize a church at this point 
under favorable prospects for soon building up a self-sustaning 
!)ody. 

At Bethesda Brother Hogau has tiad an encouraging year aud re- 
iiorts the outlook as promising. The work at Norlina under the lead- 
ership of Brother Tunstall is moving along nicely. They are 
l)uilding a nice house there — have a good Sunday school. He is 
preaching to good congregations, and the inter.est in the work is 
good. .They will want some help to finish th? house as they have 
aliout exhausted their means. 

In view of th.? fact of the Lord'.- continued blessings upon our 
labors, and the continued changes of conditions, caused by the 
liuilding of new scjools and railroads in the country, there will 
ever be increasing needs fo)- missionary effort. We are receiving 
new churches into tlie Association and opening up new points ot 
interest that demand our care and yttention.. We therefore recom- 
mend that we, this year, attempt to raise not less than $1,7.50.00 for 
this object. 

Respectfully submitted tor the Committee. 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS 

T(i the brethren of the Tar River Association: 

The Association a year ago conferred on me f.ie honor of appoint- 
ing me to read at this session the report on Foreign Missions. This 
honor I deeply appreciate, and I regret that it is impossible for me 
to be present with you. But inasmuch as this is true, I am sending 
this, the report, and am requesting Brother T. J. Taylor to read it. 

There is nothing in all the world that can be more inspiring 
to the churches of this day than a really comprehensive view ot 
I'oreign mission achievements and opportunities all over the 
loutinents of the earth. Therefore. I direct ycur attention first to 
trliat has been done. 

There are in the fields today 271 missionaries, assisted by 577 
native helpers, giving the Convention a force altogether of S4S. 
These are laboring with 342 native churches, and that their work 
is thorough is proven by ths fact t'-.at these native chtirches are 
daily coming nearer to supporting themselves and are of theii 
own initiative sending out missionaries into fields of opportunity 
around them. In the field are 422 Sunday schools, som-e of which are 
doing better work than many in our own land. There are nine train- 
ing schools for women, with ?.12 students, and in our ten theological 
schools on the mission fields there are 245 students. Among the 



2() 

missionary, eduoational aud cliaritable insUtutious 1 find there are 
i'08 schools with 6,156 pupils; 6 hospitals and thirteen dispensaries 
which are managed by thirteen medical missionaries. These noble 
men treated 51,796 patients last year. There are also four publish- 
ing houses on the field. This is the force we have been able to 
send in the past. 

Next see our opportunities. 1 do not need to study the field 
with you. This is a time of crisis in all the world. The need for 
more work and workers is urgent. The revolution in China of the 
past few months is one of the most significant events in the whole 
history of the world. And this is but the most interesting of many 
such doors of opportunities. The 7,000,000 people of that rioli and 
rapidly growing country, Argentina, call us; Brazil's 20,000,000 people 
need our help; Mexico, our next door neighbor, is in the throes of 
a re-birth; Italy, the fountainhead of Romanism, is one of our most 
strategic fields; we have be,gun a work in Nigeria, Wihich is the key 
to all the dark continent: here also is our battleground with Islam: 
.fapan, the leader of the whole continent of Asia, is just now in the 
midst of a reaction in favor of Christianity: these are our doors of 
opportunities, and being such are our reminders of a solemn obli- 
gation to go forward. 

In doing this branch of the Lord's work, we must have organ- 
ization. I therefore call your attention next to our plan of campaign. 

We work through the Foreign Mission Board, located at Richmond, 
Va., which is a committee appointed by the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention, one member of which, called a vice president, lives in 'each 
state. There is a representative of the board in each Association. 
They receive contributions from the Baptists of the South, donated 
in three ways: by the usual contributions, from bequests, and by 
an annuity plan. Of these I direct your attention to the last two. 
More and more our people ought to remember the cause of Missions 
in their wills. A still better way is to give money to the Board 
on the Annuity plan, whereby the giver receives an income from 
the gift during his life. The contributions to the cause last year 
wore $580,408, which was $70,400 more than the previous year. 1 
i-all your attention to the fact that 12 cents of every dollar of 
this went for expense, and a large fraction of this 12 cents did not 
go to the field bacauEe the churches were not prompt in collecting 
aud sending their contributions, necessitating borrowing money tor 
i-urrent expenses at interest. Therefore let me urge that all the 
I'hurches collect and remit as promptly as possible, and help in 
cutting down expenses. 

All this leads up to my next point, which is ivhat we expect to 
'lo in- the future. The Convention asked the churches to raise this 
year $618,000 for Foreign Missions, h^very dollar of this is needed 
to meet past obligations and to put the work on a hopeful basis. 



T'.:is amount is aiiportioiied among the dittereiit states, North Caro- 
lina being asked to give $r)0,000. Of tliis last sum the Tar River 
Association is expected to contribute ll.oOO. Another part of the 
Foreign Mission work in which we are asked to take a part is th." 
.ludson Centennial. "One hundred years ago Luther Rice and An 
oniram Judson went to India as Congregational missionaries. By the 
study of the Bible they became Baptists. This fact aroused the 
Baptists of America to undertake Foreign Missions. The most sig- 
nificant advance ever ordered by the Convention took place when at 
Oklahoma City last May it authorized the Foreign Mission Board to 
raise $1,250,000 as an Equipment Fund in honor of the Judson Ceu 
rcnnial. $1,000,000 of this is to be used for equipping our schools 
and publication work; $2o0,000 is to be used for building chapels, 
hospitals, and missionary homes. This is a mighty call, but it is 
mado to a mighty pfo])le." This fund is to be raised in the next 
three years. It will be entiiely separate from all other work and 
its collection, it i.s hoped, will interfere with nothing els-?. 

In view of the facts stated it is recommended: 

First, that all our people help in our Porsign Mission work b> 
s.xmpathy and piaycr; bv making our offerings as large as possible; 
by sending in these offerings now and not waiting for the last day.^ 
in MJarch or April; by subscribing for the Foreign Mission Journal, 
and by distributing tracts which may be obtained free of cost. 

Second, that we solemnly pledge ourselves to do our part to 
raise the $1,500 asked of the Tar River Association this year. 

Third, That we try to achieve the A.'^sociational Standard of Ex- 
cellence, for Missions, as follows: 

1. Every i>astor a missionary jjastor. 

2. Ever/ church !ira.\ias lor missions. 
Systematic study of Missions in every church. 

1. A Missionary Committee in ?very church. 
The Sunday school missionary in spirit. 
Every church contributing to Missions. 
Every memlier of every church contributing to Missions. 
Every church raising and if possible exceeding the amoum 
asked of it. 

9. Every chuich contributing as much for objects away from 
'::rme as at home. 

10. An offering foi- Missions on each I^ord's day that th.e church 
n;pcts. 

n. T'.:e ust^ ot envelopes for Mission offerings. 

12. A Woman's Missionary Society in every church. 

13. Every fam.ily taking the Foreign Mission Journal. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, and includes the facts 
furnished by. and the recommendations of. the Foreign Mission 
Board. J. EmvARO ALr.rx. 



28 
TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION 

Time and Places of Meetings 

1. Sandy Creek, Franklin county, commencing on fourth Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1831. 

2. Maple Springs, Franklin county, commencing on Thursday before fourth 
Sunday in October, 1832. 

3. Hickory Chapel, Nash county, Thursday before fourth Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1833. 

4. Brown"s, Warren county, Saturday before fourth Sunday in October. 
1834. 

5. Red Bud, Franklin county, Friday before fourth Sunday in October, 
1835. 

6. Shiloh. Franklin county, 23-2r)th of October, 1836. 

7. Peach Tree, Nash county, Saturday before fourth Sunday in October. 
1837. 

8. Reedy Creek, Warren county, Friday before fourth Sunday in October, 
1838. 

9. Flat Rock, Franklin county, Saturday before fourth Sunday in October, 
1839. 

10. Bear Swamp, Halifax county, Saturday before fourth Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1840. 

11. Louisburg, Saturday before first Sunday in October, 1841. 

12. Gardner's, Warren county, October. 1842. 

13. Poplar Springs, Franklin county, Friday before first Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1843. 

14. Brown's, Warren county, Saturday before first Sunday in October, 
1844. 

15. Maple Springs, Franklin county, Saturday before first Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1845. 

16. Sandy Creek, Franklin county, 24th October, 1846. 

17. Enon, Warren county, Friday before first Sunday in October, 1847. 

18. Hickory, Nash county, Friday before first Sunday m October, 1848. 

19. Haywood's (now Corinth), Franklin county. Friday before first Sunday 
in October, 1849. 

20. Red Bud, Franklin county, Friday after first Sunday in October. 1850. 

21. Warrenton, Friday before first Sunday in October, 1851. 

22. • Flat Rock, Franklin county, Friday before first Sunday in October, 
1852. 

23. Peach Tree, Nash county, Friday before fourth Sunday in August. 
1853. 

24. Reedy Creek, Warren county, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 
1854. 

25. Perry's Chapel, Franklin county, Friday bafora fourth Sanday in Au- 
gust, 1855. 



29 

26. Salem, Wilson county, Friday before fourth Sunday in August. 1856. 

27. Gardner's, Warren county, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 
1857. 

28. Poplar Springs, Franklin county, Friday after third Sunday in August. 
1858. 

29. Sharon, Warren county, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 185il. 

30. Franklincon, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 1860. 

31. Maple Springs, Franklin county, Friday before fourth Sunday in Au 
gust, 1861. 

32. Brown's, Warren county, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 1862. 

33. Red Bud, Franklin county, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 
1863. 

34. Mt. Zion; Franklin county. 

35. Hickory Chapel, Nash county, Friday before fourth Sunday in Septem- 
ber, 1865. 

36. Bear Swamp, Nash county, Friday after first Sunday in October, 186B. 

37. Cypress Chapel, Franklin county, Friday before first Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1867. 

38. Red Oak, Nash county, Friday before first Sunday in October, 1868. 

39. Sharon, Warren county, Friday after fourth Sunday in October, 1869- 

40. Poplar Springs, Franklin county, Thursday before first Sunday in Oc- 
tober. 1870. 

41. Haywoods (now Corinth). Franklin county, Thursday before first Sun- 
day in October, 1871. 

42. Sandy Creek, Franklin county, Thursday before first Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1872. 

43. Wilson, Friday before first Sunday in October, 1873. 

44. Philadelphia, Nash county, October 1-3, 1874. 

45. Reedy Creek, Warren county, Thursday before first Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1875. 

46. Henderson, September 28-30, 1876. 

47. Pleasant Grove, Nash county, October 4-6, 1877. 

48. Conoconara, Halifax county, October 10-12, 1878. 

49. Louisburg, October 9-12, 1879. 

50. Peach Tree, Nash county, October 6-8, 1880. 

51. Antioch, Halifax county, 1881. 

52. Littleton, October 5-7, 1882. 

53. Rock Spring, Franklin county. October 11-13, 1883. 

54. Mt. Zion, Franklin county, October 9-11, 1884. 

55. Wilson, October 8-10, 1885. 

56. Brown's, Warren county, October 7-9, 1886. 

57. Samaria, Nash county, October 4-6, 1887. 

58. Maple Spring, Franklin county, October 11-13, 1888. 

59. Gardner's Warren county, October 10-12, 1889. 

60. Greenville, October 9-11, 1890. 



;5(« 



6L Warrent(«i, October 8-10. 1891. 

62. Louisburg, October 5-7, 1892. 

63. Philadelphia, October 5-7. 1893,, 

64. Scotland Neck, October 11-13. 18;tC 

65. Wilson, October 9-11. 1895. 

66. Poplar Spring, October 7-9, 18!)B'. 
67.. Stoney Creek, October 5-7, 1897, 

68. Weldon. October 4-6, 1898. 

69. Warren Pains, October, ;l-\ 189^. 

70. Spring Hope. October 16-18. 1900. 

71. Corinth, October 8-10, 1901, 

72. Washington, October 6-8. 1902, 

73. Rocky Mount. October 6-8. 190:i. 

74. Maple Springs. October 4-6, 1904. 

75. Tarboro, October 3-5, 1905. 

76. Red Oak. October 9-11, 1906. 

77. Henderson, October 7-9. 1907, 

78. Sandy Creek. October 27-28-29. 190^, 

79. Sharon, October 5-7, 1909. 

80. New Bethel, October 4-2-6, 1910, 

81. Samaria. October 3-4. 1911. 
82 Red Bud. October 8-10, 1912, 



RULES OF DECORUM. 

Believing tt is best to be governed by certain rules and reg^tlations In con 
ducting the business of the Association, we adopt the following; 

1. The association shall be opened and closed with a prayer. 

2. Not more than one person shall speak at a time, who shall rise from 
his seat and address the Moderator. 

3. The person thus speaking shall not be interrui)ted. unless, he violates 
some rule of decorum. 

4. The person speaking shall adhere strictly to the subject, and in nowise 
reflect on any other brother. 

3. No brother shall absent himself from the Association without abtain- 
ing permission from the body, 

6. No brother shall speak more than twice on the same subject without 
vinanimous consent. 

7. No person shall whisper while a brother is speaking. 

8. The names of the delegates shall be enioMed by the Clerk, and called 
as often as the Association requires 

9. The Moderator may give his ideas on any subject before putting it Uh 
the vote, but is entitled to vote only in case of a tie. 

10. An order of business shall be made at the beginning of each .session, 
i\w\ shall be changed only by vote of the body. 



31 

CONSTITUTION 

1. The Association shall be composed of the pastors and of the" members 
chosen by the churches, who shall produce letters certifying their appoint- 
ment. Members thus chosen and convened together with the pastors, shall 
be denominated the Tar Rive Baptist Association, which shall have no power 
over the churches, nor shall it infringe on any of their rights. 

2. The letters from the churches shall contain the number then in fellow- 
ship and those baptized, received by letter, dismissed, excluded and died 
since last Association. 

3. The officers of the Association shall be a Moderator, Clerk, Treasurer 
and Historian, who shall be chosen by suffrages of the members present. 

4. Other churches, upon petition by letter and by delegates, and after 
a satisfactory examination of their Articles of Faith, may be admitted tn 
the body by a unanimous vote, when the Moderator shall give to the dele- 
gates the right hand of fellowship. 

5. Every church in the Association is entitled to one representative, but 
no church more than three. 

6. Every motion made and seconded shall be left to the discretion of 
the Association whether it shall be debated or not. 

7. The Association shall endeavor to furnish the churches with copies o' 
its Minutes. 

8. The Minutes of the Association shall be read and approved, and shouui 
be signed by the Moderator and Clerk before the Association adjourns. 

9. Any church not representing itself in this body for three successive 
sessions, by letter or delegates, shall bf" stricken from the roll of the church- 
es, unless satisfactory reasons are assigned. 

10. The Association shall withdraw fellowship froir any church which 
shall be found disorderly in faith or practice. 

11. Visiting brethren from sister churches, or similar bodies, may be in- 
vited to participate in our deliberations. 

12. At each session of the Association delegates to the Baptist State Con- 
vention and to the Southern Baptist Convention shall be chosen by vote. 

13. This Constitution is subject to alteration by a majority vote of the 
delegates enrolled at any session. 

14. The business of the Association shall be conducted according toMell'ti 
Parliamentary Practice, 



FINANCIAL TABLE 
Woman's Missionary Society and Churches That Have Them and Their Work 



( HURCHES 


Building and 
Repairs 

Incidentals 


1 
.2 

'■5 ^ 
2 c 

o s 


State Missions 


1 
Home j 
Missions. j 


1 
Foreign 

Missions. 


•oc 

CO 

c 

CO 

a 
o 


c 

CO 

•oo o 
« o 

=3 J= 


" 

■n.2 

at 

C 3 



•2> 
'S 



u. 

2 



Bethesda 

Browns . . 

Cedar Rock 

Gardners 

Joyners Chapel . 

Kittrell . 

Henderson _ 


$- - 


.75 


_ _ _ 


5 00 

2 00 

11 10 

2 45 

'36'38 

18 25 

58 40 

5 75 

'2 45 

8 06 
2 00 

4 15 

9 00 
2 50 

18 25 

5 65 


2 55 

2 00 

12 85 

2 40 

2 00 
59 36 
10 00 
20 28 

3 60 

'244 


4 00 

9 80 

7 00 

21 38 

5 50 

7 00 
50 57 

8 25 
72 75 

3 50 

r44 


150 

. . . 
52 73 


- - . 

5 00 
7" 00 


..... 


-•-. 


Louisburg 

Littleton . . 
Macon 


28 15 






2125 
5 00 
2 00 


Middleburg 

Peach Tree 


__. 1 .... 


5 00 
5 00 




317 


Poplar Springs 




- - 






3 59 


1 00 


Samaria 

Sharon 


2 00 


6 00 






125 


Sandy Creek. . . 
Warren Plains . . . 

Warrenton 

Roanoke Rapids 


4 00 

2 50 

26 15 


7 00 

5 00 

72 75 

10 45 




5 00 
14 50 


2 00 

5 00 

15 00 










3 59 




TOTAL 


2815 


.75 


10 00 


141 49 


152 13 


292 39151 23 


3150 


55 67 



NUMERICAL STATISTICS. 



CHURCHES 



Pastors and Addresses CLERKS AND POSTOFFICES 



Advance E R Nelson, Henderson , . 

Bear Swamp _ _ N W Bobbitt, Littleton _ 
Bethesda _ K W Hogan, Wise _ _ 

Bethlehem JN W Bobbitt, Littleton . 

Brown's . ;T J Taylor, Warrenton _ 

Bunn G M Duke, Mapleville 

Gary Chapel -- iG T Tunstall, Henderson 

Castalia [G W May, Castalia 

Cedar Rock . jG M Duke, Mapleville _ 

Corinth . . 'W L Griggs, Wake Forest 



J E Hocutt, Nashville 
M P Mustean, Warrenton 
J E Hocutt, Nashville . 
D McLeod, Whitakers 

K W Hogan, Wise 

A P Mustean, Warrenton 



Cypress Chapel 
Enterprise . _ 

Ephcsus - 

Fishing Creek 

Gardners 

Harris Chapel 

Henderson . . _ 

John Chapel 

Joyners Chapel . . W L Bilbro, Middlesex _ _ _ 

Kittrell _. .. . jE R Nelson, Henderson _ 

Littleton. _ Ja B Harrell, Littleton . . 

Louisburg . : W M Gilmore, Louisburg 

Macon T J Taylor, Warrenton „ . 

Maple Springs . . . JG M Duke. Mapleville _ 

Marmaduke . j W Hartsell, Wake Forest _ 

Middleburg _ |E. R. Nelson, Kittrell _ 

Midway G W Coppedge, Henderson 

Mountain Grove . 

Mt. Hebron ^J W Sledge, Louisburg,. 

Mt. Herman D T Bunn, Spring Hope . . 

Mt. Zion_, _ :G M Duke, Mapleville 

New Bethel ^ IG W May, Castalia .^ . . 

New Sandy Creek . ;G W Coppedge, Henderson 

No. Henderson : 

Norlina G T Tunstall, Henderson 

Peach Tree . . | W Rosser, Spring Hope 

Philadelphia !g W May, Castalia 

Poplar Springs . _ |G M Duke. Mapleville . . 

Quankie N W Bobbitt. Littleton _ _ _ 

Red Bud. G M Duke, Mapleville 

Reedy Creek AG Willcox, Brinkleyville 

Rock Spring jMack Stamp, Louisburg _ _ 

Samaria . . _ _ [ W Hartsell, Wake Forest. 

Sandy Creek [G M Duke, Mapleville 

Sharon _ iK W Hogan Wise 

So. Henderson . .1 

Social Plains J W Sledge, Louisburg . . 

Sulphur Springs . W Hartsell, Wake Forest 
Turkey Branch . . AG Wilcox, Brinkleyville 

Vaughan \ 

Warren Plains T J Taylor, Warrenton 

Warrenton T J Taylor, Warrenton . . 

White Level _ . _ J W Sledge, Louisburg , . . 

Antioch ... A P Mustean, Wake Forest 

Roanoke Rapids . I A Moore, R. Rapids 

Rosemary. A Moore, R Rapids __ 

Total ! _ 



M D Woodlief, Kittrell 

W E Bowers, Littleton ... 

J J Watkins, Keates 

C King. Aurelian Springs 

J N Tunstal, Manson . . . 

G A Alford, Wakefield 

C E Hoyle, Henderson. 

J H Boone, Castalia 

T H Sledge, Louisburg 

A A Dement, Louisburg . . _ 
E S Moore, Spring Hope _ . . 
Fletcher Bobbitt, Littleton 
W M Warren, Spring Hope . 

J R Ward, Whitakers 

J W Shearin, Macon . 

B Y Harris, Essex . _ . _ . _ 
J L H Missilleer, Henderson 



Ox: 



3 



D a 



-ot.t; 



i V CO 



ti ^ 



CQ 



4th.' 
3rd.i 
3rd.i 
2nd. I 
2nd. 
4th. 
4th. 



1000 500 

1000 200 

800 300 

2500 250 

I 

500i 300 

30001 400 



D F Pearce, Wakefield 

C H Williams, Kittrell ._.. 

E C Bobbitc, Littleton 

Thos B Wilder, Louisburg 

H A Nicholson, Macon 

J H Uzzle, Mapleville 

M T Duke, Marmaduke 

E L Fleming. Middleburg . 
J N Wester. Spring Hope 



2nd.j 
Ist.l 
2, 4 
4th. i 
1st. 
2nd.i 
Ist.l 



1000 600 

800' 300 

1500 300 

900 300 

600j 300 

2000| 350 

1000 400 



2nd. 

2nd. 
52 
52 

4th. 

4th.' 

1st. 

3rd. 

2nd. 



1500 500 ; 

1200i 250 i 

3000 300 

25,000| 700 

600! 3(M) 

2000| 600 

1000' 275, 



1000 
700 



A A Shearin, Centerville 

B C Joyner, Elm City 

G C Parish, Louisburg. .. 
D H Dicken, Henderson.. 
S P Hicks, Henderson 



J M Frazier, Norlina . 

J H Edwards, Spring Hope 

H G Leonard, Nashville 

H M Mullen, Spring Hope 

G W Green, Aurelian Springs 

C C Murphy, Castalia 

R I Harriss, Grove Hill 

M C Wilder, Louisburg 

T B Cone, Spring Hope. 

J R Collins, Louisburg . 

P R Perkinson, Wise 



3rd. 
1st. 
1st. 
1st. 



500 
1000 
1500 



H B Hagwood, Wakefield . 
S W O'Neal, Elberon. . _. 

W P Thrower, Enfield 

W H Riggan, Vaughn 

W E Hawkes, Warren Plains 

E S Allen, Warrenton _ _ _ 

J T Murphy, Louisburg 

J H Lewis, Heathsville 

J W House, Roanoke Rapids 



1st. I 
4th. 
4th.! 
2nd.^ 
1st. 
4th. I 
4th. I 
2,4' 
1st. 
3rd. 
1.31 



650 
1000 

700 
1000 
1000 
1500 

800 
1000 
1000 
1000 
7500 



350 
300 



350 
300 
350 



300 
400 
250 
400 
300 
300 
450 
500 
400 



10 
10 
22 
16 
22 

' 'el 

8' 
45 
20 
10 



4th. i 
3rd. 
2nd. 
2nd. 
1, 3 
52 
1st. 
3rd.! 



1500 
500 
1000 
1500 
2000 
10.000 
10001 
1250! 



300 
250 
300 
300 
300 
350 
600 
325 



11 



1 

3 




' '8 
4 


" 1 


2 


1 



16 



60,100il5200! 



23 12 
^2 3 
498 130 



SUINDAY SCHOOL STATISTICS. 



CHURCHES 



SUPERINTENDENTS 
AND POSTOFFICES. 






^ i_H = -Q o : b 



OH 



(/3 



HW ,2t/D |> J cyH 



RED 



Advance . M D Woodlief, Kittiell . _ 

Antioch G R Bennett, Heathsville 

Bear Swamp _ _ . ' J W Bowers, Littleton _ 
Bethesda , E A Watkins, Goldleaf.. 

Bethlehem _ i 

Brown's . . ^ |S L Bohbitt, Henderson 

Bunn _ _ I J N Ferry, Wakefield 

Cary Chapel AH Hoyle, Henderson K 2 

Castalia ;S J Bartholomew, Castalia 

Cedar Rock J B Fulgum, Louisbiirg 

Corinth . ; Jno. G Falkner, Louisburg 

Cypress Chapel jW J Wilder, Spring Hope _ 

Enterprise . _ EL Hale, Littleton _ 

Ephesus |W M Warren, Spring Hope 

Fishing Creek . -.- 

Gardners ^ ;H E Rodwell, Macon 

Harris ChapeL W H Mabry, Essex 

Henderson . _ R H Burns, Henderson 

John Chapel . _ _ . 

Joyners Chapel . _ J H Massie, Wakefield 

Kittreh _ . _ . _ . . |Mrs C H Williams, Kittrell 

Littleton ! J A Cree, Littleton . 

Louisburg Ivey Allen, Louisburg . . _ _ 

Macon | J L Colman, Macon _ . . 

Maple Springs J W Strange, Mapleville ■ 

Marmaduke _ . ;M C Duke, Marmaduke 

Middleburg ^ |R L Bennett, Middleburg . _ 

Midv/ay . IA H Edwards, Spring Hope_ . 

Mountain Grove . ^ J 

Mt. Hebron | ^ . _ 

Mt. Herman \ . 

Mt. Zion _ J H Harper, Louisburg _ _ _ , 

New Bethel ^ _ . ! W B Daniel, Henderson 

New Sandy Creek . C G Horton, Henderson . __ 

No. Henderson . ' . , 

Norlina . J W Adcock, Norlina 

Peach Tree !H Rix Edwards, Spring Hope 

Philadelphia ; W B Bunting, Nashville 

Poplar Springs i 

Quankie iW W Harrison, Weldon 

Red Bud . . . JG B Smith, Castalia 

Reedy Creek . , . 

Rock Spring 

Roanoke Rapids 

Rosemary 

Samaria. . 

Sandy Creek . . 

Sharon . 

Sc. Henderson _ 
Social Plains . _ 
Sulphur Springs 

Vaughan 

Turkey Branch 
Warren Plains . 

Warrenton 

White Level _ 



4 52 

14 71 

6 50 

7 47 



7 50 
16 136 



71 

95 

148 

75 



12 158 



7 125 

6 43 

12 160 

9 120 

3 20 

11 81 

12 150 



C N Hardy, Aspen &WHTucker, Grove Kill 
Ellis Strickland, Louisburg r 1 
W S Hancock, R Rapids 



7 

10 
3 



56i 

851 
561 

54! 

"57! 

152; 

78 

lOlj 

155; 

81' 
1701 

58' 

55! 

„ 
132i 

49 1 
172| 

"129; 
23i 

92{ 
162i 

47| 
75' 
21 
58 
77, 



2l 111 

1! 200 58 
212 



^ 




a 




a> 




!^ 




r„ 




-C 






c 









Ci 


^ 


0[ 




12 




12, 


' 


12' 



a 
> *^ 

<< 



o -oc 



en 



03 



CO rz; . 



" S _G 



ZcQ I o«2o 








205 




120 


100 




180 




80 




200 


50 


50 




165 




75 



200 



6 63 69 

71 98 105 
76, 84 



102 
90 
61 



39 
89 
102 



W Wilhams, Middlesex 

A J Joyner, Louisburg 

C W Perkinson, Wise 



Total. 



J A Shepherd, Elberon 

C J Tucker, Vaughn 

W D Knight, Enfield 

W E Hawkes, Warren Plains 

A D Harris, Warrenton 

D E Aycock, Louisburg 



12 

5i 98' 103; 

lOi 290 300 

90^ 98 

200! 213i 

99i 108i 

1001 108[ 
I 



51 

71 65 

7: 24 

15} 100; 115 

10 135! 145 

8' 180_188 

372T104II47 



. . 135 
... 12 

253 163 

185 

40 



38 
30 
39 



12 32, 

12 102 

12! 40 

12! 75! 

12! 64' 

12! 50! 

12 no; 

12! 25 

9! 30 

i .._.| 

12! 65' 

9| 30 

12i 120 



9i 



5 00 
4^00 



3 61 51 

88 18 
6i 25 25 



100 



12! lOOl 

121 ....! 

I2I 50! 
12! 91/2 1 
12! 25i 
12! 50 



12 50 



15 05! 
199 04 



3 96 

6 14 

90 02 

196 08 

18 68 



50 152 



12 
12 

121 



25 
50! 



5 00 
21 00 



140 

44 1 
50! 



70 

75 

81 

460 

152 

400 
120 



6! 42 

6! 55 

6: 40 

12! 158 

12i 54 

12i 155 

12 62 

12: 65 



2 

2 

19 151 64 

8: 100 87 

27' 

10 

3 41 19 



48 i 

. - 30 
200i 175 
476' 325 

T529! 4628 



37 
35 

18 

70; 5i 25 00 
70 .. I 196 80 
75! 10! 



17 


00 


15 


00 


30 


00 


23 40 


15 


00 


6 


00 


5 


00 



2368' 20811166 91 









FINANC lAL STATISTICS. 














Building and 
Repairing. 


j2 
CO 

c 
<v 


«2 

a) 

CO 

c 

. <u 

en a 

X 






0- 

OJ 
Xi 

H 


CO 

c 
.2 

.2 G 
'S 


1 
1 

C 

0^.2 
Si M 

«g.s2 


C 

aj.2 


»3 

C G 

."HP. 2 

'S 'co 

(-1 w 


i 




9J 
•00 

CO 

c 
cd 

a. 
u< 




■n 

c 

. CO . 

"" rr, "5 

(D G 


"co C 
'^ 2 

!■§ 


u 
a 

•00.5 


03 

"S'S 

$ 


TOTAL. 


)i$ 


$ 


$ 


$ .... 


$ 2 50 


$3 00 


$ 2 00 


$ 3 00i$. 


$ 1 00 


$ 50 


$ - - 


$ .... 


$ 47 50 










30 00 


3 20 

15 00 

5 55 

5 75 






12 00 

42 59 

4 30 

50 11 


75 

2 CK3 

50 

1 00 


3 (")0 
5 07 


3 04 
3 75 


27 00 
4 85 

"47 


75 99 


) 56 58 
) 





5 68 




4 80 
2 55 


8 00 
3 45 
20 80 1 87 


243 25 




10 00 
60 00 


126 00 


) 22 38 




10 26 




361 86 


) 100 00 




41 32 


10 20 




5 00 


5 00 


5 00 1 82 


50 24 


1 50 


2 50 


2 50 




324 48 


) . .. 




17 00 




14 00 




23 50 


34 00 


50 50 


00 


5 00 


5 35 


33 00 


302 75 


) 


2 25 


15 00 





35 00 


3 38 


5 00 


5 00 1 r>-^ 


22 91 


1 50 


3 25 


1 76 




251 60 


) .__ 




30 00 




33 00 


3 87 


2 00 


7 00 


1 50 


2 00 




4 19 


14 65 


198 00 


) ... 


20 00 


33 40 




23 00 


7 88 


8 11 


41 71 


15 00 


2 00 


5 65 




27 88 


336 63 


)! 





15 00 


50 00 


25 00 







1 92' 


8 00 


1 51 




. . .. 




201 43 


)l 




6 00 




15 00 






. . - i 8 00 




80 
1 35 








154 80 


) 5 OO 




5 00 




17 50 


5 50 


3 00 




6 15 








143 50 


) ... 


22 00 


_ 




20 00 


2 00 


3 30 


2 95 


_ 


7 44 


1 05 


2 30 


2 80 


5 05 


21-8 89 


) 1144 25 


18 08 


59 32 


1 15 


20 00 


\6 89 


17 10 


26 01 




15 05 


2 00 


5 94 


2 92 


25 84 


1478 33 


)-. 12 50 




6 00 




30 00 


4 82 


1 90 


2 90 




6 28 


2 00 


2 30 


4 22 


25 (30 


207 92 


3 SOO 00 
3 225 00 


450 34 




81 60 


33 90 


125 00 
"256 


125 00 
'453 


75 00 
"1 45 


127 27 

750 


127 73 


653 77 


25 00 


25 00 




3409 55 


6 55 


1 00 


3 00 




381 12 


i 520 00 





4 25 




10 00 


7 00 


17 70 


62 00 


6 14 


4 90 








682 07 


4 


267 06 


32 97 


14 85 




156 25 


21 28 


127 771 


78 99 


325 00 


3 26 


19 80 


36 85 


1685 50 


) 28 15 


210 93 


109 98 


30 00 


150 00 


18 25 


122 00 


176 25: 7 70 


111 25 


56 50 


25 00 


15 (30 


382 06 


2723 10 


) 2 (K) 


6 50 


6 00 




, 40 00 


10 00 


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■M:^^m 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

Tar River Association 

1913 
IN ITS EIGHTY-THIRD SESSION 

Held With the Church in 

Warrenton, Warren County^ 

OCTOBER 7th, 8th, 9th, 1913. 



The Next Session to be Held With the Church at Ephesus, 
(One Mile South of Spring Hope) Nash County, North Carolina, on 
Tuesday After 1st Sunday in October, 1014. 



To Preach Introductory Sermon: Rev. J. J. Marshall; Alter- 
nate, Rev. G. W. Hay. 



OFFICERS: Rev. G. N. Duke, Moderator, Mapleville 

Rev. A. G. Willcox, Clerk and Treasurer, Brinkleyville. 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

Tar River Association 

1913 
IN ITS EIGHTY-THIRD SESSION 

Held With the Church in 

Warrenton, Warren County, 

OCTOBER 7th, 8th, 9th, 1913. 



The Next Session to be Held With the Church at Ephesus, 
(One Mile South of Spring Hope) Nash County, North Carolina, on 
Tuesday After 1st Sunday in October, 1914. 



To Preach Introductory Sermon: Rev. J. J. Marshall; Alter- 
nate, Rev. G. W. May. 



OFFICERS: Rev. C. M. Duke, Moderator, Mapleville. 

Rev. A. G. Willcox, Clerk and Treasurer, Brinkleyville. 



CHARITY AND CHILDREN PRESS 
Thomasvi'Ie, North Carolina 



ORDER OF BUSINESS FOR 1914. 

Tuesday, A. M. 

11:00 Introductory Sermon, Organization and Appointment 
of Committees. 

12:30 Adjourn for Dinner. 

Tuesday, P, M. 

1:.30 Periodicals. 

2:00 Sunday Schools., 

2:30 Aged Ministers. 

3:00 Temperance. 

3:15 Colportage. 

3:30 Woman's Work. 

3:45 Miscellaneous Business. 

4:00 Adjournment. 

Wednesday, A. M. 

9:00 Prayer Meeting. 

9:30 Orphanage. 

10:00 Education. 

10:45 Associational Missions. 

12:00 Adjourn for Dinner.. 

Wednesday, P. M., 

1:30 Systematic Beneficence., 

2:15 Home Missions. 

3:00 Foreign Missions., 

3:45 Miscellaneous Business. 

4 : 00 A d j ournment ., 

Thursday, A. PT. 

9:00 Prayer Meeting. 

0:30 Miscellaneous Business., 

10:00 State Missions. 

10:45 Miscellaneous Business and Adjournment- 

W ALTER M. GiLMORKj 

IvEY Allen.. 



PASTORS AND POSTOFFICES. 

Bobbitt, N. W Littleton 

Ihmn, D. T Spring Hope 

t'oppedge,. G. '\^' Henderson 

Duke, G. M ilapleville 

Duckett, B 

Gregg, W. L Wake Forest 

Gilniore, W. 51 Louisburg 

Harrell, A. B Littleton 

Harper. I. H Louisburg 

Hartsell, Wallace Middlesex 

Hogan. K. "W Wise 

Hotaitt. J. E Nashville 

3[ay, G. W Castalia 

Mustean, A. P Wake 

Sledge, J. W Louisburg 

Stamps, ^lack Wake Forest 

Taylor, T.J Warrenton 

Tunstall, George Henderson 

Willcox. A. G Brinkleyville 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

To write on Aged ^linisters T. 31. Pittuian 

To write on Or])hanage G. W.May 

To write on Education George Tunstall 

To v/rite on Woman's Work Wallace Hartsell 

To write on Periodicals J. W. Sledge 

To write on Sunday Schools Mack Stamps 

'i\» write on Foreign Missions T. J. Taylor 

To •\\'rite on Home Missions W. 2\L Gilmore 

To write on Associational ^ilissions Ivey Allen 

To M'rite on State .Missions W. E. BoAvers 

To write on Systematic Beneficence S. L. Morgan 

To write on Temperance W. L. Gregg 

To write on Corlportage J. J. ^larsliall 

Sunday Scliool Gonimittef — W. E. Bowers, K. W. Hogan and IST. W. 
]]obbitt. 

ExecutiAe Committee— T. J. Taylor. G. M. Duke. Ivey Allen, T. l!ii. 
Pittrna,!! and J. M. Gardner. 



PROCEEDINGS 



Warrenton, N. C, October 7, 1913. 

The Tar River Association met with the church here 
today in its eighty-third annual session. Bro. G. M. Duke, 
the Moderator, called the body to order promptly at 11 
o'clock. A hymn was sung and prayer offered by Bro. 
Geo. W. Coppedge. 

By special appointment Bro. W. 0. Rosser, of Spring 
Hope, preached the introductory sermon. Text, Isa., 6th 
chapter and 8th verse, after which the roll of churches 
was called and delegates enrolled as follows: 

Advance— M. D. Woodleaf, G. E. Bobbitt. 

Bear Sv/amp — J. W. Bowers, Bat. Crawley. 

Bethesda — By letter. 

Bethlehem — Jesse Carter. 

Brown's — J. W. Smithwick, S. E. Allen, Albert Aber- 
nethy. 

Bunn — J. H. Odum, J. A. Pippin. 

Gary Chapel— C. G. Stokes, M. W. Currin, G. W. Ad- 
cock. 

Castalia — W. R. Drake. 

Cedar Rock — 

Corinth — 

Cypress Chapel— M. T. Wilder. 

Enterprise — 

Ephesus — G. W. Coppedge, L. M. Edwards, W. H. Aber- 
nathy. 

Fishing Creek — A. R. Shearin. 

Gardner's — Berry Wright, Vivian Shearin. 

Harriss' Chapel — J. F. Parker, B. Y. Harriss, Sam 
Hamlet. 

Henderson — J. W. Harvey, W. W. Parker, T. M. Pit- 
man. 

John Chapel — 

Joyner's Chapel — Clarence Pierce, Frank Pierce. 

Kittrell— 

4 



Littleton— W. H. May, A. B, Harrell. 

Louisbiirg— Dr. D. T. Smithwick, I. Allen, W. B. Mor- 
ton. 

Macon — Nelson Reggan, Lawrence Coleman, J. S. Now- 
ell. ' 

Maple Springs — A. W. Perry, J. W. Wheless, Dennis 
Clark. 

Marmaduke— M. T. Duke, S. R. Duke, J. C. Welch. 

Middleburg— R. L. Bennett, J. T. Mills, J. L. Jackson. 

Midway — Robert Layton. 

Mountain Grove — W. D. Dorsey, 

Mt. Hebron— 

Mt. Herman — 

Mt. Zion— W. T. Cooper, W. T. Johnson, Cade Parish. 

New Bethel— G. T. Ayscue, R. J. Frazier, G. T. Decker. 

New Sandy Creek— D. S. West. 

North Henderson — 

Norlina — W. J. James, J. M. Frazier, J. W. 'Vdcock. 

Peach Tree — Chas. Wheless, Timothy Sykes, 

Philadelphia — 

Poplar Spring — 

Quankie — G. W. Green, C. E. Snipes. 

Red Bud— J. S. Batchelor. 

Reedy Creek — T. A. Harriss, B. P. Robertson. 

Rock Spring — J. L. Chevis. 

Samaria — Geo. Taylor, Ben Bergoren. 

Sandy Creek— J. W. Lancaster, T. S. West, C. Mat- 
thews. 

Sharon — P. R. Perkinson, W. R. Coleman, 

South Henderson — 

Social Plains — H. B. Hagwood, G. A. Hagwood. 

Sulphur Springs — S. W. Oneal, R. E. Aycock, Eddin 
Short. 

Turkey Branch — George Whitley. 

Vaughan — B. 0. Riggan, J. G. Wright, W. ?L Harriss. 

W^arren Plains — W. E. Hawks. 

Warrenton — J. W. Allen, J. H. Kerr, J. R. Rodwell, 



White Level — D. B, Pearce. 

After the enrolhuent of delegates the Association was 
permanently organized by the selection of former officers. 
Rev. G. M. Duke, Moderator, and A. G. Willcox, C]erk and 
Treasurer. 

Bro. John Kerr, on behalf of the church and town, ex- 
tended to delegates and visitors a m_ost hearty, gracious 
welcome, which v/as most happily responded to by Bro. 
A. B. Harrell. 

A„ Finance Committee, consisting or Brethren M. T. 
Duke, A. W. Perry and Dr. D. T. Smithwick, v/as ap- 
pointed. 

New pastors coming among us since last session v/as 
called for and Bro. A. B. Harrell, pastor at Littleton, re- 
sponded. 

Adjourned for dinner, with prayer by Bro. Hogan. 

Tuesday, 2 O'clock. 

Association miet and was led in prayer by Bro, Mar- 
shall. 

Report on Sunday-schools was read by Bro. Gilmore for 
Bio. Fulguni, v/ho followed the report v/ith a most force- 
ful address, after which the report was adopted, 

SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

To the Tar Eiver Association : 

As a member of the committee appointed to report on Sunday 
8c'i.ool Work, I beg leave to make the following report: 

Sunday School work in isorth Carolina stands among the highest 
as to attendance. The State enrollment of attendance of all Sunday 
Schools is 64 per cent., while the Baptist is 76 per cent. Among the 
Southern Baptists it is also favorable. Its total Sunday School enroll- 
ment is 63 per cent., while the Baptist is 76 per cent. The v.'hole 
Southenr Con.veiition reports the number of Sunday Schools 65 per 
cent, as largo as tlie niimbcr of churches. In our State the number of 
schools is 0.3 per cent, as large as the number of churches. 

"We should feel proud of our increase. While yet we have not ac- 
complished all, we lind in 16 Associations there Avas a loss of 3,231 in 
attendance, while in 30 Associations there was a gain of 7,100, and 
so:;i-j ]:?,vc iiut yet reported. Approximately there was a gain of 5,G0() 



in 1912. Let us rally to the cause and sec that our Association is not, 
and AYJIl not, be one that Avill have a loss in membership and attend- 
ance, but one that will grow. 

Sixty-seven new Sunday Schools liave been organized during tlie 
])ast year, yet tliis leaves about 150 churches without Sunday Schools. 
We. have added to our churches 1,100 members b^- Baptisms that came 
i'rom the Sunday Schools. We should not be satisfied until there is a 
live, ever green Sunday School in every church in the State. AVe can 
lielp do this, each of us. by giving our earnest prayers, by putting our- 
selves in the way to do something to bring this about, and by seeing 
that our churches and Sunday Schools give more of their means, rather 
than less, as our last report shows we gave $24.32 less last year than 
the year before. The training of teachers is one of the great things 
that Avill help oiu- Sunday Schools. We suggest that each Sunday 
School see that every teacher in it be enrolled and take up this work. 
I believe the average attendance of our Sunday Sch.ools in tlie Tar 
Iviver Association is larger by 25 per cent, than last 3'ear. but yet let us 
not be satisfied, as this is the place a child should go after tlie cradle to 
be trained in the Christian life. We read, "Train a child i]i the way he 
should go, and wlien he is old he will not depart from it." 

J AS. B. FULGHTt;M. 

The next business was the report on Temperance, which 
was read by Bro. K. W. Hogan, who follovved the report 
with one of his characteristic, forceful addresses, after 
which the report was adopted. 

A REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 

There is an old fable of Orpheus and Euridice. Euridice had been 
captiu-ed through death, by the bite of a serpent, and taken to the in- 
fernal regions, and Orpheus, her bereaved husband, went after her; 
taking with him his harp. Vriien he came to the infernal regions he 
began to play, and as he sang those tender strains, the very ghosts shed 
tears. Tantalus, in spite of his thirst, stopped for a monrent his effort 
for Avater, Ixion"s wheel stood still, the vulture ceased to tear the 
giant's liver, the daughter of Danaus rested from the task of drawing 
water in a sieve, and Sisyphus rested a Avhile from his ceaseless, never 
ending task of rolling a huge stone up a hill. For the first time in the 
history of hell, it is said, the cheeks of the Furies were wet with tears. 
Proserpine could not resist, and Pluto gave way. They said, "Eurydice 
may go Avith you. but you must not look back.'' They at once proceeded 
on their way. lie leading, she following, through passages dark and 
steep, till they had reached the outlet into the up]ier world, when Or- 
pheus, in a moment of forgetfulness. to assure himself that Eurydice 



was following, ca>st a glance behind him, when instantly she was borne 
away. 

Friends, do we not get from this okl fable an idea of how faithful, 
persistent and perpetual must be our efforts to rid truth from the 
hands of wicked men? 

Purley A. Baker, general superintendent of the Anti-Saloon League 
of America, says: "'Abraham Lincoln reluctantly consented to the levy- 
ing of an internal revenue tax as a war measure only when assured 
by members of his cabinet and leaders in Congress. that it would be re- 
pealed at the close of the war. When the war ended and the broken 
fortunes of the republic were manifest, the liquor traffic, with that ser- 
pent-like wisdom for which it is noted, was the first to urge the con- 
tinuation of this tax, knowing the force of a bribe upon the public con- 
science. From that time to the present the chief cry against national 
prohibition has been that the government must have the revenue.. The 
adoption of the income tax amendment to the Federal Constitution 
furnishes an answer to the revenue problem. 

The liquor traffic, then, urged the continuation of the internal reve- 
nue tax to relieve the indebtedness incurred in war — not that — but as 
a bribe to obtain the privilege of carrying on a war more destructive 
morally, mentally, physically and financially than all the civil and un- 
civil wars of all the world combined. The ghastly thing about it is that 
so many of us have had our hands, our souls, and our lives besmeared 
with the curse of a bribe so long. I am glad that there is a great 
awakening on. The righteous war is on and is well under way. At Co- 
lumbus, 0., on jSTovejuber 10 to 13, the artillery will be focused as never 
liefore on the gigantic liquor traffic of this country. Columbus discov- 
ered America, and at Columbus we are going to discover the facts that 
will rid America of her greatest foe — the legalized liquor traffic. 

Paul, in wa-iting to the Corinthian church, says : "Wherefore come 
out from among them, and be ye separate, saitli the Lord, and touch 
not the unclean thing; and I will receive you." (2 Cor. 6:17.) Again 
he said, "I know and am persuaded by the Lord Jesus, that there is 
nothing imclean of itself." (Rom. 14:14. 

Paul realized, no doubt, as many of us do, that a great many things 
are unclean because of their association. I have no sort of hestitancy 
in saying that strong drink, as such, belongs to this class. Look not 
thou upon the wine when it is red, when it giveth its color in the cup. 
when it moveth itself aright. Therefore, brethren, our duty is plain 
and unmistakable — total abstinence. The liquor traffic is, and ever has 
been the twin brother of the shameful white slave traffic. In Proverbs. 
■2od chapter, Solomon says, under the inspiration of the Almighty, "If 
you tarry long at the wine; if you go and seek mixed wine, your eyes 
shall behold strange women, and your heart shall utter perverse 



tilings." He concludes that the end of all such is death. At the last it 
biteth like a serpent and stingeth like a cockatrice. (Prov. 23:32.) Yea 
tlioxi shalt be as he that lieth doAAm in the midst of the sea, or as he 
that lieth upon the top of a mast. (Prov. 23.43.) 

In this holy warfare the law of the road is, as with Orpheus, don't 
look back. Don't be discouraged. Don't become too anxious and too 
apprehensive. Don't have greater faith in the forces of evil than you 
do in the powers of righteousness. Have faith in the efficacy of what 
lias been accomplished and faith in the powers of civic righteousness to 
accomplish yet greater things. Cast no faltering, half-hearted look be- 
hind. He that putteth his hand to the plow and looketh back is no 
more woi'thy ofthe plow. Eeternal vigilance is the price of Prohibition. 
"What Has Been Accomplished? 

"More than half the counties of the republic, multitudes of incor- 
]jorated villages and cities and nine entire States containing upwards of 
forty-six millions of people — 50 per cent, of the population — embracing 
above two-thirds of the entire territorial area of the country, have out- 
lawed the saloon. The traffic has been driven from the army and 
navy, from innii.igrant statiojis and from the national capitol; but the 
greatest triumph of the temiierance forces of the nation was the pas- 
sage of tlie Webb-Kenyon bill over President Taft's veto, not only for 
the service it will render laAv enforcement, but for the demonstrated 
fact that Congress is responsive to the organized, expressed wnll of the 
l>eo])le on this as on other important moral issues.'' — Purley A. Baker. 

I'lethren. let us have faith in what has been accomplished, and keep 
up the fight until we have National Proliibition written in the consti- 
tution of these United States of AnuM'ica-~the home of the fi'ee, and 
the land of the brave. And then with eternal vigilance let us lirandish 
every foe to our highest and best civilization until the province of 
peace and of univei'sal goodwill has been ushered in. 

K. W. HOG AN, 
For the Committee. 

The report on Aged Ministers was called for, and in 
the absence of any report, Bro. A. B. Harrell -was called 
upon and, after a stirring address, the following resolu- 
tion by Bro. Ivey Allen, which was adopted : 

"Resolved, That the pastors of the Tar River Associa- 
tion be urgently requested to take a collection as a Christ- 
mas gift to aged ministers in each of their churches at 
som.e time as near Christmas as they can." 

A cash collection was taken amounting to .^16 62. 



REPORT ON AGED MINISTERS 

Oiu' ,yioat (lillcieiicc hetween Paganism and and Christianity is tliat 
I'lui^stianity teaches the eare of the indigent and the infirm. From tliis 
idea liave grown tlie hospital, tlie asylum and the orphanage. 

It is someAvhat surprising that we. as Christians, have been so slow 
to recognize the claim of the aged minister upon us. Of all claims of 
pliilanthro])}' and cliarity. none are so deserving as this. 

The claim of the aged minister upon us ought not to be viewed in the 
light of a charity, but latlier as an obligation. The best we can do for 
these faithful ser\ ants of the Cross is none too good for them. Minis- 
ters of tlie gospel seldom accumulate any estate of this world's goods. 
It is rare that tliey receive for their services more than a bare support. 
^^'lu^n old age antl inlirmity comes upon them, it usually finds them 
entirely destitute. Then the cause for which they have spent their 
strength and tlieir lives ought to support them until God calls them 
hence. 

We I'econimeiul that oiu' churches take a collection for this pur- 
]iose on the Sunday nearest Christmas. We also recommend that if 
these offerings be not suflicient for the needs o fthis worthy cause, that 
we take other and additional collections as circumstances may require. 

A. B. HORRELL. 

Report on Periodicals was called for, and in the absence 
of a report, Bro. John Kerr was asked to prepare a report 
for the Minutes. 

REPORT ON PERIODICALS. 

To the Tar River Baptist Association: 

()ur deiiominational papers in North Carolina have become to be one 
of the great factors in the work of the Baptist churches in this State. 
We cannot appreciate the healthy and clean newspaper too highly. 
^Most people can lea dnow. and a large per cent, of our citizens read 
nothing but the newspaper. Through tliis medium these people acquire 
information and some become to be really intellectual. Our Baptist 
periodicals are ably edited; they create a wholesome Christian influ- 
ence and stimulate men and Avomen to do God's service. We espe- 
cially recommend that oiir denomination support our papers. We then 
can kee]i in contact with the religious life of the world and we can lear)7 
of tiu' history and attainments of our church. We cannot grow in 
grace and spirituality imless we know of and are in full sympathy with 
the work of God's churcli. AYlien the Christian ceases to want knowl- 
edge and perfect understanding of the cause which he has espoused, he 
then becomes lukewarm and is of small service in our Master's king- 
dom. The church and the world demands that our Christian activity 

10 



should be virile. We \\aiit strung men wlio, with a strong purpose, 
will take no uncertain stand in the great contests of life. 

Wti point with pride to the periodicals of our denomination, espe- 
cially those published in our State. Let us appreciate the work of these 
papers, let us enthusiastically support them. 

JOHN W. KERE. 

(By Request.) 
^\'arre^ton, N. C. Oct. 8. 1913. 

Bro. Farmer, representing the Biblical Recorder, was 
welcomed and made an address for the Recorder. 

Bro. Arch Johnson, representing Charity and Children, 
was welcomed. 

Bro. C. J. Thomson, financial secretary of the Foreign 
Mission Board, was also welcomed. 

Bro. Marshall read a report on Colportage, wliich was 
ordered printed in the Minutes. 

REPORT OF THE MISSIONARY COLPORTER FOR THE YEAR END- 
ING OCTOBER 7, 1913. 

Since the last Association I have visited nineteen churches, served 
one mission point, preached fifty sermons and witnessed seven conver- 
sions. 

Besides this work. I have given away 1,728 tracts and sold books 
as follows: Thirty-one Bibles, eighty-two Testaments and one hun- 
dred and twenty-nine volumes of valuable religious literature; also 
have added several members to our Recorder family. 

By way of compensation I have realized: 

Profit on books $1 15.5S 

\'oluntary contributions 80.83 

Received from Mission Board 68.7;5 

Total $265.10 

We can but realize that the coljiortage work is an important feature 
o\' our general work. It may be that only a religious tract will cause 
some one to be saved, and that the co])orter will enter some homes that 
the pastor, with his many and varied cares, may pass by. 

Solomon said, "As a man, thinketh in his heart, so is he." Then 
let us train the thoughts of our people, not only by preaching to them, 
but by placing good, wholesome literature in their homes. In these two 
A\ays we must counteract the efl'ects of the pernicious literature that is 
sf'isttcred bj'oadcast throughout our commonwealth. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. J. ilARSHALL. 

11 



Mt. Herman church asked for a letter of dismission to 
united with Roanoke Association. Request granted. 

New church at Mt. Ohve asked to be admitted into body 
and letter referred to a committee consisting of Bros. W. 
B. Morton and K. W. Hogan, and after examination, 
recommended its reception, and the Moderator r^ave right 
hand of fellowship to delegates, R. S. Conn, J. M. Strick- 
land and J. D. Strickland. 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher for next ses- 
sion appointed as follows : W. N. Bobbitt, ^ Bro. Ab- 
ernathy, of Spring Hope. 

Standing Committees Appointed. 

To write on Aged Ministers — T. M. Pitman. 

To write on Orphanage — G. W. May. 

To write on Education — George Tunstall. 

To write on Woman's Work — Wallace Hartsell. 

To write on Periodicals — J. W. Sledge. 

To write on Sunday Schools — Mack Stamps. 

To write on Foreign Missions — T. J. Taylor. 

To write on Home Missions — W. M. Gilmore. 

To write on Associational Missions — Ivey Alleii. 

To w^rite on State Missions — W. E. Bowers. 

To write on Systematic Beneficence — S. L. Mo^^gan. 

To write on Temperance — W. L. Greggs. 

To write on Colportage — -Bro. Marshall. 

x^djourned. 

Tuesday Night Session. 

A mass meeting in the interest of Home and Foreign 
Missions was held. Bro. Gilmore, for Home Mission Board, 
and Bro. C. J. Thompson, for the Foreign Mission Board, 
made soul-stirring, thrilling addresses. 

Bro. 'W. R. Cullom and Bro. Hobgood were welcomed. 

Resolution by Bro. Taylor: 

"Resolved, That a committee of three be appointed to 
arrange for four meetings to be held in different parts of 

12 



the Association to plan for the Laymen's Movement." 
Adjourned, prayer by Bro. Sledge. 

Wednesday, 9 O'Clock. 

Association met and was led in praise service by Bro. 
Sledge. Minutes read and approved. 

Committee appointed to arrange for Laj^man's Move- 
ment appointed as follows: Ivey Allen, J. R. Rodwell 
and W. T. Cooper. 

Sundaj'^-school committee, W. E. B.owers, K. W. Hogan 
and N. W. Bobbitt. 

Bro. Taylor asked that twenty minutes be given to 
Woman's Work, and Bro. Taylor read report for Bro. Mor- 
gan. The report was followed by interesting ?,ddresses 
by Bros. Taylor, Hogan and Harrell, after v/hich the re- 
port was adopted. 

REPORT ON WOMAN'S WORK. 

Tlic liiiptist woincii of our State have written only the first and 
siualk'st chapter in thc^ir liistory of achievement. They reported at 
their last meeting 'A4 ^Vonlan's ^Missionary Societies, 122 Young 
Wonuui's Auxiliaries, 310 Sunbeam Bands and 4o Royal Ambassador 
Hands, with contributions aggregating $39,668. !)(!. For a number of 
years tlie women's societies have raised annually about one-third of 
the entile anumnt raised for State. Home and Foreign Missions. 

The W'onian's ^lissionary Union of our Association now reports 28 
Wonum's Missionary Societies, 3 Young Woman's Auxiliaries and !( 
Su.nbeani Bands, all of which contributed last year $904.57. 

Recognizing how great a force each Woman's Society may be in 
its own church and community, your committee would respectfully and 
earnestly uige that the time is ripe for our societies to adopt a more 
comprehensive and aggressive policj'. If in the past it seemed necessary 
for our Mouien to do their work cjuietly and almost sei)arately from the 
cliurch. a larger ministry is now clearly open to them. It means the 
ju'ovoking of all the t'hureh to good works, not alone l)y example (as in 
the ])ast). but more actively also by a settled policy and a definite or- 
ganization to stimulate and lead the entire church: 

1. In a com])reliensive system of giving. What matters it if dues 
are abolished in a Society. ])rovided something larger takes the place 
of dues'.' And a Wouiiin'^^ ^[issionary Society has done something in- 
lliiitely larger if it has re\ olutionized the gi\ing. not merely of a grouji 

13 



1 



of Momen, but alwo of an entire chui'cli. And precisely that some socie- 
ties are doing by proposing that the women of the Society will canvass 
every woman in the church for weekly or monthly contributions if the 
men will canvass the men, all uniting to give the largest possible success 
to a church envelope, or other collecting system. The amount to be 
credited to the Society can easily be learned from the Treasurer's book. 

2. In a com])rehensive campaign of education in missions. Why 
should not the A\oincn of the Societies determine that many of the 
able and monied men in the churches shall become intelligent about 
missions? iNlany men Avould join mission study classes, judiciously 
organized and wortliily taught, but apparently women for the present 
nnist lead in organizing such classes. And men will read books on mis- 
sions if they are jnit into the Sunday School or church library, and the 
men are asked to read them. 

?>. In a larger effort to make the gospel effective in our own com- 
numity. So long as we fail to grip and save our own community by 
means of our gu.s])el, we shall have little heart to send that gospel to a 
community 12,00(t miles away; and recent investigations make it un- 
deniable that not only in the city, but also in the country, the churches 
are losing their gri]) on the people. Every Society, therefore, should 
lead in arousing the clmrch to a ministry of practical helpfulness to the 
people near its doors, and the new department of Personal Service 
sliould become aglow with zeal for local missionary effort. 

S. L. MORGAN. 

Comittee on Time, Place and Preacher reported as fol^ 
lows : Ephesus the place. Time, Tuesday after first Sun- 
day in October, 1914. Bro. Marshall to preach introduc- 
tory sermon, G. W. May alternate. 

Bro. Rodwell read the report on Orphanage, which was 
followed by a thrilling address by Bro. Arch Johnson. A 
cash collection amounting to $25 was taken for said ob- 
ject, after which the report was adopted. 

REPORT ON ORPHANAGE. ^ 

The Mrst child was received into the Orphanage November 11, 1S85. 
Since that time 1,420 children have been enrolled, and the present num- 
ber is 411. Average cost per child about $100 a year. Children are re- 
ceived between the ages of five and twelve and dismissed according to 
jireparatJon rather than age. 

At the Kennedy ^leraorial Home, which is located in Lenoir county. 
two dormitories are in process of erection and will be ready for the re- 
ception of children by January 1. It is hoped that sufficient funds will 

14 



come to oonipk'tt'ly e(|iiii) this part of the institution so that the work 
tliere may go forward without interruption. About half of the neces- 
sary funds have been secured. 

A vahiable gift has been made to the Orphanage consisting of 375 
acres of kind in Transylvania county by Misses ]\Iary and Victoria 
(ialloway. This place is estimated to be worth $25,000, but is not avail- 
able dvu'ing tlie lifetime of ]Miss ]\Iary Galloway. Another notable gift 
was the beqiu^st in the will of Dr. S. W. Little, of Davie county, which 
it is believed will turn into the Orphanage treasury some $25,000. These 
two great contributions, in addition to a small sum left by the late 
■ lolui Pullen, have all come since the beginning of the year 1913. 

AMiile we are grateful to record these notable gifts to the Orphan- 
age, its constant enlargement requires a steadily increasing current 
fund. Bequests are usually put in some permanent memorial to the 
giver, and are never used to buy meat and bread for the children. That 
part of the work has always devolved on our churches and Sunday- 
scliools and, please (<od. it may ever be so! 

The most careful attention is given to sanitary conditions, cleanli- 
ness of buildings, grounds, as well as personal cleanliness, being rigidly 
lequired. The houses are always kept in neat and orderly condition. 

About 175 acres of land are under cultivation. Four mules and six 
horses are scarcely sufHcient for the team woik during the summer 
months. Tlie gi'owing herd of Holstein cattle is a good beginning for 
the dairy. 

This department, along with the trucking side of farm vrork, is re- 
ceiving special attention. 

The work of the school is carried through tlie ninth grade. But 
the work in the sewing room, kitchen, laundry, printing office, shoe shop 
and on the faim — all are a part of a system of education. 

\Voik in (lonu'stic science is l)eing taught this year for the first 
time. 

The greatest work of the Orphanage is in surrounding the children 
with a moral atmospliei'e and instructing them in spiritual things. A 
well organized Sunday-school and church with their various depart- 
ments. such as Baraca and Philathea classes, missionary society, mis- 
-i(in study classes, etc.. furnish excellent facilities fo)' the growth in 
knowledge and in the grace of giving, and above all, pointing them to 
tlie Lamb of God who taketh away the sins of the world, is the supreme 
and crowning work of the institution. 

About 40 ])er cent, of the current fund conies from the montlily 
collections in the Sunday-schools, and yet scarcely one-third of our 
North Carolina Baptist Sunday-schools are giving these monthly col- 
lections. We strongly insist that every Sunday-school in this Associa- 
tion fall in line witii this very sensible proposition and thus swell the 

15 



imiuber of monthly givt-rs to this great object. 

Our churches are magnifying Thanksgiving Day as a time to make 
a liberal contribution to the Orphanage. We liope all our churches will 
duly observe this day. We would suggest that in many churches it is 
best to select a Sunday nearest Thanksgiving Day to hold this special 
service. This can be done to advantage on country fields. Do not neglect 
til is ofTering. It gives the extra shove as we enter upon the winter 
months. 

Cliarity and Children is itself a great contributor to the Orphanage. 
Every Sunday-school ought to take a club of the paper and thus in- 
crease its circulation and usefulness. Special attention is called to our 
well equipped job plant. Respectfully submitted. 

J. R. RODWELL. 

Special order for the hour being Associational Missions, 
the report was read by Bro. Ivey Allen. Bros. Coppedge, 
Sledge and Duke made fine addresses, after which the roll 
of churches was called and pledges taken as follows: 

PLEDGES. 

Henderson $ 175.00 

Warrenton 75.00 

Turkey Branch 70.00 

Littleton 50.00 

Xew Bethel 50.00 

Philadelphia 50.00 

Samaria 50.00 

Castalia 40.00 

:Macon 40.00 

Sandy Creek 40.00 

Harriss Chapel 35.00 

Poplar Spring 30.00 

1>ear Swamj) 30.00 

I'.unn 25.00 

Cedar Rock 25.00 

Corinth 25.00 

Fishing Creek 25.00 

Mt. Zion 25.00 

Red Bud 25.00 

Sliaron 25.00 

Sulphur Springs 25.00 

Cypress Chapel 27.50 i 

Cary Chapel 27.50 

Bethesda 20.00, 

(Uirdners 20.00 

16 



Joyner's Chapel 20.00 

:.iarinaduke 20.00 

:\Iiddlebury 20.00 

Xorlina 20.00 

Peach Tree 25.00 

Reedy Creek : 20.00 

Rocky Spring 20.00 

Louisburg 175.00 

Maple Springs 75.00 

Browir.s 60.00 

Warren Plains 20.00 

Ihiterprise 17.50 

South Hemlerson 15.00 

\'aug]m 15.00 

Midway 12.00 

Advance 10.00 

Bethleliem 10.00 

:^[t. Hebron '. 10.00 

New Sandy I'reek 10.00 

Xorth Henderson 10.00 

<>aanker 10.00 

Social Plains lO.OO 

White Level 10.00 

.Miss Maggie Pitts 10.00 

Bobbitf s Chapel 10.00 

B. B. Collins 10.00 

L. it. S., Brown's 5.00 

Kittrell 5.00 

W. M. S., .Maple Springs 5.00 

W. :«. S., Mid<l!ebing 5.00 

W. M. S., Xorlina 5.00 

\Y. M. S., Peach Tree 5.00 

W. M. S., Warrenton 10.00 

S. B.. Warrenton 5.00 

W. M. S., Sandy Creek 5.00 

N\'. M. g., Samaria 5.00 

J. W. Sledge 5.00 

Rainsville 5.00 

Total $1,719.50 

Adjourned for dinner. 

Wednesday, 2 P. M. 

Association led in praise service by Bro. Marshall, 

17 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, INCLUDING THE 
REPORT ON ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONS. 

Tile approval of (Jod «eeras to have been plact'il upon the eti'orts of 
the Tar River Association to evangelize its own people. A large per 
cent, of the increase in the membership of the Association thi'ough the 
years has been the result of these eti'orts. And He is still blessing us in 
this work as tlie reports of your missionaries of the past year's work 
will show. And we may count it a blessing that we still have oppor- 
tunity for enlargement in this work can still hear the command to 
^o forward; aiid I wish to press it upon your minds that you need not 
t'xpect tills door of opportunity for service to be closed. For, when- 
ever a cotton mill is built or a iww line of railroad is projected, there 
will be tlie need for us to go in and carry the gospel; and these mills 
are being built and these railroads are being projected and will continue 
to he. We used to tliink that all the churches would some day get to 
he self-supporting; but it is evident now that we need not expect these 
cotton mill churches to ever be entirely so. And we may as well prepare 
to be giving them fostering care always. 

Your executive committee had these things in mind in making their 
apjiropriations for the work of the past year. 

Appropriations weie made as follows: 

Slash $ 25.00 

N. & S. Henderson 180.00 

Norlina 75.00 

IJethesda 75.00 

Mt. Hermon 75.00 

Kittrell 125.00 

Inez 75.00 

Alsop's Chapel 50.00 

Vicksboro 75.00 

Centreville 75.00 

Mt. Olive • 75.00 

For expenses of organizer of Woman's Work 100.00 

Of this last amount only $38.00 was used. I want to call to your 
attention the work of ]\frs. L. W. Bagley and to express the regrets of 
the executive committee that other Avork has taken her from this As- 
sociation. 

Bro. Gilmore has done a splendid work at Bunsdel's Chapel, a new 
(luirch organized by him in a needy section about eight miles south 
of Louisburg. They have as yet a small membership, but have good 
congregations, a good Sunday-school with an attendance of about 100, 
and the outlook is good for building up a good church there. 

At Slash Bro. J. H. Harper has been preaching once a month on Sun- 
daj'^s. He haa organized a fine Sunday-school and is doing a fine work 

18 



liere. He reports one conversion at the regular appointment. 

Bro. G. W. Coppedge has been preaching rogulfirly once a montli 
at Centreville. He reports 18 conversions, most of whom were baptized. 
at Sandy Greek. He is expecting to organize a church there next Fri- 
day evening at 2 o'clock. 

Bro. J). T. Bunn has done faithful work at Mt. Hermon. His reports 
three additions and a fine outlook for the future. We regret that this 
ilmrch has taken a letter to join the Roanoke Association. 

Bro. Wilcox has not been able to prosecute the work at Inez and AI- 

sop's Chapel with his usual vigor on account of his sickness, though he 

reports the work at Alsop's in good shape and the outlook encouraging. 

Bro. C. C. Williams has had charge of the work at South Henderson 

and reports a fairly prosperous year there. 

While we are relieved of the charge at Mt. Hermon, the work at 
Runsdel's Chapel ought to be fostered, and the other points will be 
asking for quite as large, if not larger appropriations in order that more 
I'fficient work may be done. 

There should, therefore, be no falling off in our contributions, and 
we recommend that you raise this year not less than $1,750 for Associa- 
tional Missions. 

I. ALLEN, 
For Executive Committee. 

Report on Home Missions was read by Bro. Gilmore and 
recommendation that the Association raise $1,200 during 
the year. The report and recommendation were adopted. 

HOME MISSIONS. 

The task before Southern Baptists in their Home Mission operations 
is a gigantic one, and one that grows tremendously with each passing 
year. The fundamental law of successful missionary propaganda is to 
]iave a proper care for the base of supplies. This Southland of ours, 
which seems, under God, to have been designed as one of the mightiest 
factors in the evangelization of the world, will multiply its efficiency for 
its great task in proportion as it becomes thoroughly imbued with the 
spirit of a vitalized Christianity itself. 

The Task. In the South we find approximately 30,000,000 people, 
only about ten million of whom are even nominally Christian. There 
are two million and a half white Baptists in this territory, and about 
as many more colored Baptists. In other words, about 40 per cent, 
of all members of all religious bodies in the South are Baptists. This 
fact places a tremendous responsibility on us in behalf of the other 
20,000,000 in our midst who are not even professing Christians. 

Now, of the 24,000 Baptist churches in the South, statistics show 
that 42 per cent, gave absolutely nothing last year for Home or Foreign 

19 



^lissions, or other uplift work. Fourteen and a half per cent, g-ave. less 
tlian $5 to both of these objects combined. There are practically 13,000 
of our cluirches that are unenlisted and doing nothing to further: the 
kingdom of of our Redeemer beyond their local field, 18 of these being 
within tlie conlines of the Tar River Association. When we take into 
account tlie fact that in the churches that are enlisted only a compara- 
tively small number of the members are doing anything at all, it reveals 
to us a very serious state of affairs, and one that is engaging the earn- 
est endeavors of our Home Mission Board. 

Another condition. There are more than 3,000 homeless churches 
that are struggling for a mere existence, worshipping under brush 
arbors, rented halls and schoolhouses, and which can never hope to be- 
come efficient under such conditions. 

There are 10,000,000 negroes in the South, of whom more are Bap- 
tists than belong to all other denominations put together. These are 
our neighbors, our wards. 

Of the 300,000 Indians in this country, 100,000 of them live in Okla- 
Iionia, one of the States belonging to our Convention. 

The three and a half millions of foreigners in our midst, many of 
tliem being ignorant and superstitious and hostile to our form of gov- 
ernment and religion, constitute a very grave problem for us to handle. 

Just south of us is the island of Cuba with its 2,000,000 inhabitants, 
who are naturally looking to us for the gospel in its purity. Still an- 
other stragetic center is the Canal Zone. 

There is a magnificent opportunity for Baptists in the mountain 
section of our country, which covers over 178 counties in eight States, 
where three and a third millions of people of the purest Anglo-Saxon 
blood live. Now the task before Southern Baptists is to bring to bear 
on these various and, in some instances, conflicting elements of our con- 
stituency the saving and uplifting influence of the religion of the Lord 
Jesus Christ. 

Agencies and Methods. To the Home Mission Board located in At- 
lanta, Ga., of which Dr. B. D. Gray is Corresponding Secretary, is this 
task committed. The Avork of this Board is divided into departments. 

1, Cooperation and Enlistment. Our own Dr. Arch C. Cree is at 
the head of this new^ department, which promises much in the way of 
enlisting and vitalizing our vast unused resources. 

2. Evangelism. Dr. Weston Bruner is at the head of this depart- 
ment, and he has associated with him some 24 other evangelists. As a 
result of their labors last year there were 0,798 additions to our 
cliurches, 4,982 being by baptism. 

3. Mountain Schools. Under the wise superintendency of Dr. A. E. 
Brown, of Asheville, this work has grown marvellously since 1898, when 
it was started. There are now 34 schools with over 5,000 pupils in this 

20 



.syst.em of Home Board schools. 

4. Cuba. We have 31 missionaries in this island, with Rev. W. N. 
IMcCall as superintendent. 

5. Canal Zone. Rev. J. L. Wise and four other missionaries are 
laboring here. 

(j. '. Indians. AVe have eighteen workers among theni. Dr. J. F. Love, 
of Dallas, Tex., who is the assistant secretary of the Board, has charge 
of all the work west of the river. 

7. Cooperative Work. The policy of the Home Board has ever been 
to work in the closest cooperation with the various State Boards, assist- 
ing them in carrying on the work committed to them. Many of our 
States are unable to take care of the amount of destitution within 
tlieir borders. In this cooperative work last year there were 3(5,000 
added to our churches, 18,000 of them by baptism. 

8. Foreigners. Leaving out of the count Cuba, we had about 50 
workers among the foreigners in the Sovith last year, 13 in seaport 
cities. 10 in inland cities and towns, and 2" in Texas among the Mexi- 
cans. 

[). Church Building. At tlie last Southern Baptist Convention a 
movement was launclied looking toward the raising of a million dollar 
loan fund to be used in aiding struggling churches to build and get on 
tlieir feet. Dr. L. B. Warren has been appointed the head of this de- 
jiartment, and he is diligently at work on his gigantic task. 

The Lord has greatly prospered our Southland in these latter years. 
;\Iuch of this rapidly increasing wealth is gravitating into Baptist hands. 
Sliall we not consecrate all this to the Lord? Will not the Baptists of 
tlie Tar River Association do their part toward meeting the unparal- 
lelled opportunity that is just before us? 

North Carolina lias been asked by the Convention to contribute 
.$35,000 to Home Missions this year. We recommend, therefore, that 
tliis Association undertake to raise at least $1,200 of this amount. 

We further recommend most heartiy The Home Field, the organ of 
the Home Board, and the other literature gotten out by the publicity 
department of the Board for free distribution to those who will apply 
for it. 

We also recommend that the executive committee, with the coopera- 
tion of the Home and State Mission Boards, seek to arrange for a dem- 
iiistration field of two contiguous churches and locate a pastor in their 
midst, if possible, and that, to assist in perfecting this arrangement. 
\\e invite Bro. C. A. Upchurch, the Home Board specialist for this work 
in this State. WALTER ]\L CILMORE. 

Report on Foreign Missions was the next object to 
claim the attention of the body, and Bro. Taylor read the 

21 



report, which was followed by an address from Rro. Hob- 
good, after which the report was adopted. 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

Never in the history of Foreign Missions has our success and pro- 
press on foreign fields been as great as during the past year. Mexico is 
the only exception. There the unsettled condition of the country has 
hindered the work. Our missionaries are beginning to rejoice in tht< 
liarvest, and a note of joy, confidence and triumph runs through their 
reports. In Argentina and Africa our workers are meeting with grati- 
fying success. In Italy and Japan the clouds are breaking away. Long 
continued efiorts in the face of discouragements are beginning to tell, 
and the outlook brightens with encouragement. The work in Brazil and 
China is a marked success and afi'ords marvelous opportunities. From 
the whole world God speaks to us through the progress of the work and 
its great needs, and bids us "Go Forward." 

The effect of Foreign Missions upon our people at home has been 
very encouraging. Speaking of "What Foreign Missions Has Done for 
Us," the Board in its last report to the Convention says: 

"It has caused us to look after education here in the home land. Sim- 
jdy read the life of Luther Rice and what followed therefrom, and we 
can easily see how our people were brought to undertake educational 
enterprises as they had never done before. They were made to see the 
necessity of training their sons and daughters for Christian service, and 
to a great extent our deep interest in education dated from Luther 
Rice's return from India. 

The Baptists were awakened to world-wide responsibilities and at 
the ;:.ime time to the great opportunities and obligations which were 
before them in the home land. By mission work they were drawn to- 
gether, and they received a new conception of unity among them in asso- 
ciations, conventions and other meetings. The mission work brought 
them to a greater liberality and they have grown in the grace of giving. 
This has been a great blessing to our people. They have come to deeper 
spirituality. In reaching after souls the Lord's Spirit has moved with 
ureat poAver among us. In the performance of duty, trying to save 
men on the other side of the world, we have found that the Saviour has 
drawn closer to us. He has mainfested himself to our people. 

"Surely we ought to rejoice in a work which brings to us the bless- 
ings of a larger vision, better education, union, activity, liberality, spir- 
ituality, and which helps to save not only the uttermost parts of the 
earth, but us and our children from selfishness and sordiness. The 
prosecution of world-wide missions brings the richest blessings, and of 
these none is greater than the abiding presence of the Lord." 

22 



The same report contrasts the statistics of 20 years ago \vith those 
of today, as follows: 

"The great development of our work in recent years creates a heavy 
demand which should be met by us. Let us make a brief comparison 
with our work as reported 20 years ago and this year. Then we had no 
medical missionarj^, only a native physician on the foreign field. This 
vear we have 13 medical missionaries, seven hospitals, nine medical dis- 
pensaries and our workers report 65,3.33 people treated. Then we had 
Irt schools, with 598 scholars. This year we report 260, with 7,481 schol- 
ars. These include ten theological seminaries, with 222 students, and 
eight women's training schools, with 101 scholars. In 1893 we had no 
I'egular publishing plants. Now we have publishing plants and book 
houses that are turning out millions of pages of books, tracts and Bibles. 
Then we had 177 missionaries and native workers on the field; now we 
liave 849. That year there were reported 383 baptisms and a total mem- 
bership in our churches on tlie fields of 2,923; this year 4,532 baptism- 
and a- membership of 27,545. That year the missionaries reported $5.- 
.■r68.42 as contributed on the foreign fields ; this year the missionaries 
report $89,483.70. All this goes to show that we have left the day of 
small things and must come up to the greai opportunities and respon- 
.sibilities which God has placed upon us. 

''When we look back over ou)' receipts for a few years we see hoM' 
•ivonderfullj' God has blessed us. In 1873 the convention for the first 
time had its contributions go beyond $50,000. Then in 1890 there was 
rejoicing when the receipts went beyond $100,000. In 1903 we went 
beyond .$200,000. hi 1907 we first went beyond $400,000; and in 1912 
beyond .$580,000. In the meantime great advance has been made in the 
work on the foreign fields. We have about $900,000 in equipment in 
our (lifl"erent foreign stations. This consists of churches, schools, hos- 
fiitals, publishing plants and homes for missionaries. 

"We hope and believe that in 20 years more what we are doing to- 
day will appear small in proportion to what will be done then. Botli 
individuals and churches w'ill be giving enough to support a whole sta- 
tion." 

We now liave under appointment and on the foreign field 285 mis 
sionaries and 569 native workers. This gives us 854 workers on our 
foreign fields. There have been 4,532 baptisms this year, which is the 
hirgest number in the history of our foreign woi'k. 

We commend the Judson Centennial Equipment Fund to oui' 
cluirches. This one and a quarter million dollars is to be distinct from 
and in addition to the regular annual income of the Foreign Mission 
I'oard, and is to be used for building churches, missionary homes, hos- 
])itals, schools and publishing plants. 

During last year Southern Baptists contributed to foreign mission* 

23 



.$o43,44G. This year Soutliern Baptists are asked to contirbute to for- 
eign missions $(iM!.o(K). Of this amount the Tar River Association is 
asked to contribute only i^ilJoO. We can do this witli great ease if 
[lastors and members are iu earnest. If we would average 27 ceiits 
per member to foreign missions the amount would be raised. Let us 
do it. If the pastors are willing the Tar River Association will give 
the amount asked for to foreign missions. 

J.et the pastors ami laymen get busy and we will go forward at- 
tempting great things for God, and seeing glorious results. 

T. J. TAYLOR. 

Bro. \V. N, Johnson, pastor of Wake Forest church, and 
Bro. R. T. Vann, president of Meredith College, vere wel- 
comed. 

Bro, Johnson spoke most interestingly on State Mis- 
sions, and Bro. Vann for our college, and $10.98 was given 
to Mr. Jordan, a pupil in the school. 

Bro. Ivey Allen offered his report as Treasu'cr of the 
Executive Committee, which was referred to Bro K. W. 
Hogan to audit, who reported examined and found cor- 
rect. 

REPORT OF IVEY ALLEN, TREASURER EXECUTIVE COMMIT- 
TEE TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 

r>r. 

'ro i!:!lan(e on h.and October 7, 1912 .$ 130.51) 

"i'o 'i.moiuit rece'ved from Finance Committee 1.188.70 

T » amount received from Rev. A. G. Wilcox 13.00 

To amount received fruiu Fishing Creek Church 2.75 

T ) -Jimount received from Quankie Church 4.10 

To amount received fronr Mt. Hermon Churcli 4.75 

To .1 mount received from Xortli Henderson Church. 17.00 

'I'o "imount received fro)u Quankie Cluirch 9.40 

To amount received from Fishing Creek Cluu'ch. . 8.70 

To amount received from Turkey Branch Cluirch 20.00 

To amount received from North Henderson Church 8.25 

To amount received from Turkey Branch Church ,....,,., 5.00 

To amount received from Quankie Church 5.50 

To amount received from Fishing Creek Church 5.00 

To amount received from Warrenton Cluu-(!li 25.00 

'J'o t) mount received from Louisburg Sunday-scliool 13.38 

'J'o anmunt received from Interest 13.40 

Total $1,480.53 

24 



Cr. 

i>y :i mount paid K,ev. A. G. Wilcox $ 55.05 

My amount paid Mrs. L. W. Bagley i»5.0U 

l!y amount paid Rev. L. .Johnson 905.00 

J?y amount paid Rev. Walters Durham 64.20 

)5y amount paid Mrs. L. W. Bagley 3.0(1 

J!y amount paid Rev. W. R. Cullom 29.0.'i 

|}y amount paid Rov. B. Pressley Smith 19.35 

By amount paid Walters Durham 24.50 

Total $1,113.1:5 

Balance <m hand \ $ 345.20 

Committee on order of business for next session, Ivey 
Allen and Bro. Gilmore. 

Adjourned, prayer by Bro. Johnson. 

Wednesday Night Session. 

Association met and was led in prayer by Bro, HartselL 
The order for the hour being Systematic Beneficence, 
the report was read by Bro. A. B. Harrell, who followed 
the report with a most appropriate and informing ad- 
dress. 

REPORT ON EYSTEMATIC BENEFICENCE. 

It is only our purpose, in this report, to discuss that part of Chris- 
tian beneliceneo which refers to the giving of our means to the support 
of the gospel. 

Tliere is religion in giving to worthy objects. It is a means of 
Christian grace of which we ought not to deprive ovu'selves. The most 
unselfish pleasure on this earth is that which comes from the bestow- 
ing of a worthy donation upon a worthy object. There is also an ele- 
ment in it of which the selfish man may take advantage if he will — that 
is, he is commanded to cast his bread upon the waters, and it shall re- 
fiun to him after many days. 

But that we may properly enjoy the blessings to be derived from 
the exercise of this Christian virtue, and that our giving may be syste- 
matic, and not done in a hap-Iiazard wrty, we recomniend that our pe^)- 
jde be carefully instructed in the following three points: 

1. When shall we give? The teaching of the New Testament is 
plain on tliis point, that o\u' contributions ought to be made regularly 
Hud weekly. "Upon the first day of the week let every one of you lay 
hj him in store as God hath prospered him." This text also includes our 

25 



next point, viz: 

2. Who Should Give. "Let eveiy one of your lay by him in store." 
God prosjjers every man to a greater or less extent, and so every mem- 
ber of every church ought to be taught that he is expected to contribute 
his part to the support of the gospel. 

Then, what is each one's part ? That brings us to the next point. 
How Much? This question is answered in two words: The tenth. 
1 cannot believe that God requires less of us, with the enlightenment 
which we may receive under the grace of the gospel dispensation, than 
He required of the ignorant Jew. Therefore, we believe that to satisfy 
the obligation resting upon us, our gifts ought to aggregate not less 
than the tenth. 

He who has mastered the three jn-eceding points, will have no trouble 
with our last recommendation, which is, that all of our people be taught 
to contribute to each of the objects of our Convention. 

Finally let us remember that the wealth which we may accumu- 
late here, is but transient at best, and may take unto itself wings and 
!ly. But that which we give away is permanent assets and may follow 
us to bless even in the great beyond. 

A. B. HARRELL. 

By motion of Bro. Taylor, the further discussion of the 
subject was deferred until arrival of Bro. Brewer. 

A resolution passed by the Baptist State Convention 
with reference to the church at Wake Forest, was read, 
asking the Association to raise $750 for said church, 
w' ■ ih resolution was adopted and a committee consisting 
of -ethren K. W. Hogan and J. W. Sledge was appointed 
to ..^portion said amount among the churches. 

Bro. Johnson, pastor of the church, then followed with 
a magnificent address. Further discussion of Sy.stematic 
Beneficence was resumed and Prof. Brewer, of Wake For- 
est, making a most interesting address, after which the 
report was adopted. 

Adjourned with prayer by Bro. Vann. 

Thursday, 9 O'clock. 

Association reassembled, and after the prayer and 
praise service led by Bro. Hartsell, proceeded with its reg- 
ular order, which was miscellaneous business. 

Bro. T. J. Taylor was appointed delegate to the South- 

26 



ern Baptist Convention. Rev. G. M. Duke, A, J. Willcox, 
A. B. Harrell, W. T. Tate, G. T. Tunstall and Wallace 
Hartsell delegates to the Baptist State Convention. A. B. 
Hartsell and A. G. Willcox as fraternal messengers to 
Roanoke Association. 

Resolution of thanks by Bro. Harrell unanimously 
adopted : 

"Resolved, That the thanks of the Association be ex- 
tended to the church at Warrenton, the town o^ Warren- 
ton, and the Warrenton railroad for their cordial hospi- 
tality." 

A motion by Bro. J. J. Marshall, which was adopted, 
that the minutes of the W. M. S. be printed with the min- 
utes of the Association, they paying their pro rata part of 
the expense. 

Bro. K. W. Hogan offered the following, which was 
adopted: 

"Resolved, That the churches of the Tar River Associa- 
tion be requested to instruct their delegates to attend, and 
stay through the entire session of the Association." 

Bro. Gilmore offered the following, which was passed: 

"That the Clerk be instructed to have usual number of 
minutes printed and receive $30.00 for his compensation." 

It was also ordered that the Executive Committee ap- 
propriate money in the hands of the Treasurer to defray 
expenses of Mrs. Harper as she travels in the interest of 
the Woman's Missionary Society, 

TAR PIVER ASSOCIATION IN ACCOUNT WITH A. G. WILLCOX, 
TREASURER. 

Amount Received. 
Oc'tol^er. l!U-i. 

To halamc due Assoiiatiou at last scs.sioii .$ 2(>.l)(i 

Received fiom Finance Committee for State Missions 1.5.00 

Rec'Mved t'roni Finance Committee for Home ^Missions 7.rt.> 

Reeeived ficni Finance Committee for Foreign Missions lO.O.i 

Received from Finance Committee for aged mlnisteis 4.2.1 

Received from I'lisli collection for aged ministers 8.48 

Received from j-'inaiice Committee for Orphanage .'>'i.-">l 

27 



Ueceived from Finance Committee for S. S. Missions lO.OU 

Received from Finance Committee for Minutes 29.21 

deceived from cash collection for Orphaniige 18.13 

Jioceived from South Henderson for Associational Missions 13.00 

Total $231.34 

Amount Disbursed. 

]'>y amount paid Arch Johnson for Orphanage: :..;..;...: .$ 36.51 

Ky amount paid Arch Johnson, cash collection for Orphanage. . . . 18.13 

l!y amount paid Walters Durham, State Missions. 15.90 

l!y Amount paid Walters Durham for Home ]^Jissions 7.9o 

Uy amount paid Walters Durham for Foreign Missions 16.9-5 

r.y amount paid Walters Durham for aged ministers 4.2,^ 

]3y amount paid Walters Durham, ca&h collection aged ministers 8.48 
Hy amount paid Walters Durham for Sunday-school Missions... 10.00 
I'y amount paid Ivy Allen from South Henderson for Associa- 
tional Missions 10.00 

Hy Amount paid A. G. W'illcox 10.00 

S. H. Averitt, ]n-inting Minutes 55.00 

( lerk's fee 25.0Q 

1). T. Bunn. work on liis field lO.OQ 

I'Apt uses 2.01) 

lialanec hie treasmer . 1.83 

Total . . .... .$233.17 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. G. WILLCOX, Treasurer. 
I'jxamined and found coddect. 

W. B. MORTON. 

Bro Tunstall offered the following resolutior, which 
v\-as adopted: 

''That we authorize the Executive Committee to con- 
sider the employment of Miss Sue Kelly to visit the W. 
M. S. of Tar River Association, and appropnate the nec- 
essary fund to employ her for her work."^ 

Hour for special order having arrived, Bro, Tunstall 
read the report on Education. Bro. Vann, in his own in- 
imitable way, followed with an address, after which the 
report was adopted. 

EDUCATION. 

Since "ur last rejiort great progress has been made in edxication. 

28 



Two acts of our last Legislature have made the educating of the masses 
more feasible than ever before. The six months law will give our boys 
nnd girls a much better opportunity to prepare themselves, and the 
compulsory law will make an opportunity for those who heretofore 
have been kept at home by their parents. As a result, we will have bet- 
,t'.^r educated men and women all over our state. 

Such an advancement in general education necessarily means that 
Ave nmst make a corresponding increase in ministerial education. Our 
])reacher should be the chief ^ man of thought, the wisest leader, the saf- 
est counselor, the truest friend and the most highly esteemed citizen in 
each community. To this end he ought to be an educated man. 

The Board of education reports that there were more ministers at 
Wake Forest last year than ever before at any one time in the his- 
tory of the college. We have increased in number, but our contribution 
veniains the same. One of two things must be done: Decrease our al- 
lowance to the men, or increase our contribution. Since there is sucl|i 
a demand for educated preachers, and since the majoritj^ are almost 
entirely dependent upon this aid. tlie most plausible plan would be to 
i-nlarge our funds. 

At our last >State Convention the .Seminary Students" Fund was 
united with the work of the Board of Education. For this work the 
Convention set as a financial standard $7,500.00, Wake Forest to receive 
.•t;.5,O00.nO, and Louisville $2,000,00. Of this amount Tar River Associa- 
tion is asked to give .$000. This would mean an increase of one hun- 
ilved ($100.00) dollars over the amount pledged last year. There is no 
reason wViy we should not meet this request, and by so doing, strengthen 
our \\ork in every respect. Let us all of one accord join hands and stan(l 
I'v enr denoiniiiatioiial selu)Qls all over the State. . . , . 

Respectfullj' suf^mitted, 
... G. M. BEAM. 

The Finance Commtitee reported as follows • 
We, the Finance Committee, beg to make the following 
report. We have received for — 

Associational Missions $1,281.38 

Minute Fund 81.31 

Norlina Church . . .::;.;....... 15.00 

Orphanage . . . ; 5.83 

State Missions 12.50 

Foreign Missions .....; ....... . 22.68 

Woman's Missionary Society .......: 15.00 

29 ■ ■ 



Respectfully submitted, 

M. T. DUKE, 

A. W. PERRY. 

D. T. SMITHWICK. 

The $15.00 for the Woman's Missionary Society the 
Clerk was instructed to give $5.00 each to Associational, 
State and Foreign Missions. The $30.34 excess which 
they report, Clerk was instructed to turn over to Execu- 
tive Committee. 

Committee to apportion amount to each cb.iirch for 
the Wake Forest church reported as follows: 

COMMITTEE APPORTIONMENT. 

Heiuleison .$ 50.00 

l^oui&burg 50.00 

ilapk Springs 15.00 

Warifiiton -30.00 

Uiow lis 25.00 

Xew BetJiel 20.00 

Turkey Branch 10.00 

Philadelphia 20.00 

Sandy Creek 15.00 

Castalia 25.00 

:\[acou 25.00 

Samaria 20.00 

(.'edar Rock 20.00 

Harriss Chapel 10.0(^ 

Red Bud 15.(10 

Poplar Springs 15.00 

Cypress Chapel ] O.OU 

Sharon 20.00 

Warren Plains 20.00 

Hear Swamp 15.00 

Bunn 7.50 

Cary Chapel 15.00 

Bethesda lO.CO 

iiardners 25.00 

,Mt. Zion 10.00 

Peach Tree 10.00 

South Henderson ] 0.00 

Mid\\ ay 5.00 

Kittrell 5,00 

30 



White Level 5.00 

New Sandy Creek 5.00 

Rock Spring 10.00 

Sulphur Spring 10.50 

Fishing Creek 10.50 

^^[iddleburg 10.00 

Enterprise 10.00 

Reedy Creek ^ 10.00 

Marmaduke * 10.00 

Bethlehem 10.00 

Joyner's Chapel 10.00 

Xorlina ., 10.00 

Vaughn 10.00 

Quankie 5.00 

Mt. Hebron 5.00 

Social Plains 10.00 

Mcksboro 5.00 

This closed the business of the session. 

Bro. Taylor, the loved pastor of the church, sjjoke lov- 
ing words of the great pleasure it had been to him and his 
people, and the people of the town to have had the Associ- 
ation with them. 

Bro Duke spoke tenderly and lovingly of the great 
pleasure it had been to him, and to the brethren, for the 
privilege of sharing their gracious hospitality, and after 
one of the most delightful and profitable sessions, de- 
clared the Association adjourned to meet on Tuesday af- 
ter the first Sunday in October, 1914, with the church at 
Ephesus, Nash county. 

Bro. Sledge prayed and "God be with you till we meet 
again," was sung and we took parting for our several 
fields of labor. 

G. W. DUKE, Moder.ttor. 

Maplevill -. N. C. 

A. G. WILLCOX, Clerk and Treasurer. 
Brinkleyville, N. C. 



31 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION. 
Time and Places ot Meetings. 

J. Sandy CVfck. H'rankliii coniity. coiuuiencing uii fourth Sunday iii 
October, 1831. 

'1. 31aple .Springs. Frankl'm county, coninu-ncinm on Thursday beforo 
iViurth Sunday in October, 1832. 

."!. Hiekor;\; Cliapol. XuhIi county. Thursday Ixd'ore fourth Sunday in 
October, 1833. 

4. Bl•o^vn"s. Waircu cduiity. iSmulay before fourth Sunday in Oct<j- 
bcr, 1834. 

.1. Red lUid. Franklin cnunty. Friday before fourtii Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1835. 

t*'. Shiloh. Franklin county, October 23-25, 1836. 

7. Teach Tree. Xash connty, Saturday before fourth Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1837. 

8. Reedy ('reck, ^\'avr<■n county, Friday before fourth Sunday in Oc 
tober, 1838. 

i). Flat Rock. Franklin county. Saturday before fourth Sunday ii( 
October, 1839. 

10. Bear S\^anl[l. Halifax county, Saturday before fourth Sunday iri 
October, 1840. 

11. Louisbvirg. Satiir<lay l)efore first Sunday in October, 1841. 

12. Gardner's. AS^arren county. October, 1842. 

13. Poplar Springs. Franklin county, Friday before first Sunday in 
October, 1843. 

14. Rro^vn"s. ^\ arrcu county. Saturday f)efore first Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1844. 

15. Mapie Spriuj^s. Fianklin county, Saturday before first Sunday in 
October, 1845. 

16. Sandy Creek, Franklin county, October 24, 1840. 

17. Enon. Warren coimty, Friday before first Sunday in October, 
1847. 

18. Hickory. Nash county, Friday before first Sunday in October. 
I.S48. 

19. Haywood's (now Corinth). Franklin county, Friday before first 
Sunday in October, 1849. 

20. Red Bud, Franklin county, Friday after first Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1850. 

21. Warrenton, Friday before first Sunday in October, 1851. 

22. Flat Rock, Franklin county, Friday before first Sunday in Oeto- 
i)er, 1852. 

23. Peacli Tree, Nash county, Friday before fourth Sunday in Au- 
gust, 1853, 

32 



24. Reedy Creek, "VVarren covirity, ( Friday before fourth Sunday in 
August, 1854. ■ ■ i '„ . 

25. Perry's Chapel, Franklin county, Friday beforu fourth Sunday in 
August, 1855. ; /■.;./ ', 

26. Salem, Wilson county, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 
185G. '■■; ' 

27. Gardner's, Warren countj', Friday before fourth Sunday in Au- 
gust, 1857. ■ , .;..; , 

28. Poplar Springs, Franklin county, Friday after third Sunday in 

August, 1858. u,; ; ,,.:.'" -^;':-,:-q ■■j: -,,- 

■29. Sharon, Warren county, Friday, before fourth Sunday in August, 

1S59. ;:,;;; -'•.■- ,," ] i.,^ ,-V , " ■ ' ',-, 

30. Franklinton, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, I860. 

31. Maple Springs, Franklin county, Friday before fourth Sunday 
ill August, 1861. . 1 ,^ii 

32. Brown's, Warren county, Friday before fourth Sunday in August, 

^^^-- ,::::;:! ^^^'■V /'^" "' , ' 

33. Red Bud. Franklin county, Friday before fourth Sunday in Au- 
gust, 1863. \;;; '■ :V; .;.,,' ■^"' '"' V 

34. Mt. Zion, Franklin county. ^ • , 

35. Hickory Chapel, Nash county, Friday before fourth Sunday in 
September, 1865. :; 

30. Bear Swamp, Nash county, Friday after first Sunday in October, 
1S66. , : ; . 

37. Cypress Chapel, Franklin coupty, Friday before first Sunday in 
October, 1867. 

38. Red Oak, Nash county, Friday- before first Sunday in October, 

1SG8. -: ; . 

3!l. Sharon, Warren county, Friday after fourth Sunday in October, 
186!}. 

40. I'oplar Springs, Franklin countyj Thursday before first Sunday in 
October, 1870. 

41. Haywoods (now Corinth), Franklin county, Thursday before first 
Sunday in October, 1871. 

42. Sandy Creek, Franklin county, Thursday before first Sunday in 
October, 1872. ^ , " 

43. AVilson, Friday before first Sunday in October, 1873. 
• 44. Philadelphia, Nash county, October 1-3, 1874. 

45. Reedy Creek, Warren county, Thursday before first Sunday in 
October, ;olv875. ■ / ,. ■ '. |- , ■.,,..,.,.,, .,,r [,..-, .... '.\- .„.V „, . ,. 
46.: Henderson, September 28-30, 1876. . ,, V ! ./'•" ','- 

47. Pleasant Grove, Nash county, October 4-6, 1877. 

48. Conpconara, Halifax county, October 10-12, 1878. 

49. Louisburg, October 9-12, 1879. ',..,.,.■: ■, ,■ .,' '. . 

33 



•■>0. Peacli Tree, Nash county, October C-8, 1880, 

jI, Antiocli, Halifax county, 1881, 

.)2. Littleton, October 5-7, 1882. 

53. Rock Spring, Franklin county, October 11-13, 1883. 

54. Mt, Zion, Franklin county, October 9-11, 1884. 

55. Wil8on, October 8-10, 1885, 

56. Brown's, Warren county, October 7-9, 1886. 

57. Samaria, Nash county, October 4-6, 1887. 

58. Maple Spring, Franklin county, October 11-13, 1888; 

59. Gardner's, Warren county, October 10-12, 1889. 

60. Greenville, October 9-11, 1890. 

61. Warrenton, October 8-10, 1891. 

62. Louisburg, October 5-7, 1892. 
03. Philadelphia, October 5-7, 1893. 

64. Scotland Neck, October 11-13, 1894. 

85. Wilson, October 9-11, 1895. 

66. Poplar Spring, October 7-9, 1896. 

67. Stoney Creek, October 5-7, 1897. 

68. Weldon, October 4-6, 1898. 

69. Warren Plains, October 3-5, 1899. 

70. Spring Hope, October 16-18, 1900. 

71. Corinth, October 8-10, 1901. 

72. Washington, October 6-8, 1902. 

73. Rocky Mount, October 6-8, 1903. 

74. Maple Springs, October 4-6, 1904. 

75. Tarboro, October 3-5, 1905. 

76. Red Oak, October 9-11, 1906. 

77. Henderson, October 7-9, 1907. 

78. Sandy Creek, October 27-29, 1908. 

79. Sharon, October 5-7, 1909. 

80. New Bethel, October 4-6, 1910. 

81. Samaria, October 3-4, 1911, 

82. Red Bud, October 8-10, 1912, 

83. Warrenton, October 7-8, 1913. 



RULES OF DECORUM. 

Believing it is best to be governed by certain rules and regulation* 
irt conducting the business of the Association, we adopt the following: 

1. The Association shall be opened and closed with a prayer. 

2. Not more than one person shall speak at a time, who shall rise 
from his seat and address the Moderator. 

3. The person thus speaking shall not be interrupted, unless he vio- 
lates some rule of decorum. 

34 



4. The person speaking shall adhere strictly to the subject, and in 
nowise reflect on any other brother. 

5. No brother shall absent himself from the Association without ob- 
session, and shall be changed only by vote of the body. 

6. No brother shall speak more than twice on the same subject with- 
out unanimous consent. 

7. No person shall whisper* while a brother is speaking. 

8. The names of the delegates shall be enrolled by the Clerk, and 
called as often as the Association requires. 

9. The Moderator may give his ideas on any subject before putting 
it to the vote, but is entitled to vote only in case of a tie. 

10. An order of business shall be made at the beginning of each 
taining permission from the body. 



CONSTITUTION. 



1. The Association shall be composed of the pastors and of the mem- 
bers chosen by the churches, who shall produce letters certifying their 
appointment. Members thus chosen and convened together with th^- 
pastors, shall be denominated the Tar River Baptist Association, which 
shall have no power over the churches, nor shall it infringe on any or 
their rights. 

2. The letters from the churches shall contain the number then in 
fellowship and those baptized, received by letter, dismissed, excluded an<l 
died since last Association. 

3. The officers of the Association shall be a Moderator, Clerk, Treas- 
urer and Historian, who shall be chosen by suffrages of the members 
present. 

4. Other churches, upon petition by letter and by delegates, and 
after a satisfactory examination of their Articles of Faith, may be ad- 
mitted to the body by a unanimous vote, when the Moderator shall give 
to the delegates the right hand of fellowship. 

5. Every church in the Association is entitled to one representative, 
but no church more than three. 

(5. Every motion made and seconded shall be left to the discretion of 
thti Association whether it shall be debated or not. 

7. The Association shall endeavor to furnish the churches with copies 
of its Minutes. 

8. The Minutes of the Association shall be read and approved, and 
should be signed by the ^Moderator and Clerk before the Association ad- 
journs. 

0. Any church not representing itself in this body for three sueces- 
-ive sessions, by letter or delegates, shall be stricken from the roll of th"! 
i-hurches. unless satisfactory reasons arc assigned. 

35 



■ lb. i The' A-SSoclattoh ;;sliall withdraAt. fellowsliipwjfrom ff^iiyrjelmirch 
vhich shall be found disorderly in faitliior -practice';::; l ; Jv.n.'Vj cn':^r:i, 

11. Wsitiug brethreii fl-6iu sister churches, or .siiiiii'lar Jbodies, raiiay, jje 
invited to imrticipate in oiU" deliberations. l . j ji i', .; I-; ■ . ; .■ 

12.'' -At'feacli session 'of the Association delegated ltd the Baptist; State 
Convention and to the Southern Baptist ConViEin-ti:oD- .shall be chosen 
by vote. .■j.:[:l ' ■ -i i'-j'./v :; ;:. ^l]' • -, ; ■■- U-:;:.Li; i':';j-;!;j o-j ,' 

■ -13. --Tlwfe Cbnstitutidfi jis subject to alteration by a majority: 'vote of 
tlie delegates enrolled at anj^ session.' . 'jlU o«: ■ o tr i I 

: 14. The business of the Association shall be conducted accorJiiing "to 
Mell's rarlianientary .Praictic6v. ■■■' v -^'j^ r, ■ i. 



.0 .flj 



vfto'' 









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§6 



MINUTES 



or THE 



NINTH ANNUAL MEETING 



' ^gman'f M^ Union 



OF THE 



:: Dr: 



;iOTT 



TAR RIVER ASSOCIATION^ M 

HELD WITH THE 

SHARON BAPTIST CHURCH ^^^r r 
Wise, North Carolina . » y> , - 
Sept. 24th, 25th and 26th, 1913 ' 



OFFICERS 1913-1914. 

Mrs. W. W. Parker. . .Vice-President 

Mrs: M. H. Hayes. . .......... . . .Second Vice-President 

Mis.'? Lena White. . . ... . . . .:'.-.. . . .Third Vice-President 

]Vj[-i8& Helen E.-Weldon. . . . . Secretary and -Treasurer 

37; 



PROCEEDINGS. 

Wednesday morning at 8 o'clock the introductory ser- 
mon was preached by Rev. A. L. Morgan, of Henderson, 
N. C, from the text, Isaiah 21:11. 

Thursday Morning. 

At 10 o'clock praise service was conducted by Mrs. W. 
D. Horner. 

The Vice-President, Mrs. L. W. Bagley, being absent on 
account of having accepted work at the Thomasville Or- 
phanage, thereby being removed from the Woman's Mis- 
sionary Union of the Tar River Association, Mrs. W. W. 
Parker, of Henderson, second vice-president, presided. 

Organization. 

Enrollment of delegates and two minute reports from 
societies. 

A most cordial address of welcome was made by Mrs. K. 
W. Hogan in behalf of Sharon church and society. 

Mrs. W. G. Coleman, of Gardner's, happily responded. 

The Secretary read the report of the Vice-President of 
her year's work. 

Report. 

During the year closing with this meeting, 30 churches 
have been visited. 

There are now 28 Woman's Missionary Societies, a gain 
of five for the year. 

Three Young Women's Auxiliaries, an increase of two, 
and nine Sunbeam Bands. 

We had as many Bands last year, but some of those 
have died and others organized to fill the vacancies, thus 
making an increase of seven societies during the year, 
making our number now 40. 

Two hundred letters and 225 cards have been written. 
An honest effort has been made to keep the individual so- 
ciety in touch with the work as planned by our Central 
Committee; also to have each organization represented 



at this meeting that these messengers shall be filled with 
greater interest in all features of Woman's Work. May 
this be especially true of the jubilate meeting, which I 
hope and believe, will be led on Friday, September 26, by 
one or more of the Central Committee. Let me urge each 
one to get a clear idea of what is to be done and go home 
to work and pray for a glorious outcome of a similar meet- 
ing in your own church. See to it that each woman in 
each church in this Union has the opportunity to share in 
the great Jubilate Gift for foreign and home missions, 
giving the home missions to the "Church Building Fund," 
and the contributions to the foreign missions to the Jud- 
son Memorial Fund. 

It is to be much regretted that the Union takes so little 
interest in the Louisville Training School, Bible Fund 
and Expense Fund. Let us see to it that there is more in- 
terest taken in these objects next year. Not do less for 
the others. Oh, no. Increase on them, too, but remember 
these also. Some of our largest contributing churches 
sent in no Expense Fund and only nine sent a contribution 
for Louisville Training School and one a gift to the Bible 
Fund. 

For the two quarters ending May 31 and Aug'ist 31, we 
have reported $394.23. We are asked to report $1,000 at 
this State meeting. This leaves $605.77 to be raised dur- 
ing these two quarters, $302.89 for each. This can be 
raised if all will bear this in mind during the special col- 
lection of State Missions and the Christmas offering. 

Besides this $605.77, we want to make a creditable 
stand with the other Associations for the Jubilate Gift. 
Let us do our duty during these six months. Surely op- 
portunity was never so great, and opportunity means re- 
sponsibility. More than half our churches failed to make 
the amount asked for at our last Associational Union. 

Let us awake and taking for our watchword for the 
year, "Serve Jehovah with gladness," work and pray and 
give of our time, our strength and money. Remember if 



th6 standard of excellence is reached by oun AssociatioAal: 
Union each itidividual society must come to its assistance; 
Praying God's blessing on your choice of a leader, and 
Association, I bid you a tender farewell. id bu.;- j ;o 

\ ■■ :■'■■-•■-[ MRS. L. W. BAGLEY, n 

^'^ ' ;'.V--/r '-'''' ' ^ -■ ■ ■ '•'■'•' •;•' -'^j Vice-President.- •■ 

At the close of the reading pf this report it wa^ ypted 
that a message of love and regret be sent to pur r^iirijig 
Vice-President. The Union then heard the reading pf the 
Treasurer's report, which was as follpws:^ ,; . ,:,; v . 

Treasurer's Report. 

Receipts 1912rl913: : - r I o i K ' : 

From W. M. U., Gardners, .... ............ ,$13.10 

Societies . ;. , , , • v, . ....... ,•.••• • • • • • ll-(95 

---- ■ • ■ ^■'- ■^■^- -■•- . ..:- r.-'niU/C' s--:cz- :.:'. .:,-:■.?. rr-Tur— 
Total . . . ,........,.:.>........,,..;. . ,,. ,J25.Q5 

" Z^^' ^ Disbursements. _ -■-^-' ^ -f^a.ue ::;■;. 

Paid for prihting 500 Minutes^ . , .... rri':.:/: ■ ...$22.00 

Express and postage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ; ; .'. . : 2.60 

Balance on hand -'■■.45 



Total . '::.■;: :M ;: : . . . . ; ! . .':..... .... ..;... :$25.05 

^ :J^^^ '; MAMIE COLEMAN, Treas. 

A Sunbeam meeting was conducted by Mrs. W. W. Par- 
ker, of Henderson. Mildred Wester, Lynnie Elmore and 
Irvin Mangum, all of Henderson; Gladys Thoroughgood 
and Olf Lansvich, of Vaughan, taking part in the pro- 
gram. ,- ^ 

The morning session was dismissed with prayer by 
Mrs. J. T, Mills. :. ; _; 

Dinner was served on the grounds by the ladies of Sha- 
ron and cojnmunity. \ „: _, . , ., " 

"Thursday Afternoon. "^ * 

At 2o'cloek Mrs. W. t>. Horner conducted a W. M. S., as- 



sisted by several ladies, who read papers oil different 
phases of the work and made brief talks. 

At the close of the W. M. S. Miss Edna Allen read a 
paper on Royal Ambassador work. 

The afternoon session was dismissed with prayer by 
Miss Kelly. ,^.:..-.:k^ ■;: ■ .■;.:-^-,; . ^: :..:■._: 

Thursday Evening. 

At 7:30 p. m. Thursday Dr. C. J. Thompson, of Raleigh, 
made an able address on Foreign Missions from Matt. 
6:10. 

Friday Mo^nfnl 

'■ Friday morning at 10 o'clock Mrs. V. L. Pendleton, of 
Warrenton, conducted the devotional exercises. 

The report on Training School was made by Miss Helen 
Weldon. 

Report on Margaret Home by Miss Tazzie Parham. 

The following report was made by the Committee on 
Obituaries : 

Report. 

Two deaths have been reported from our Woman's Mis- 
sionary Societies since our last meeting. Mrs. Ann Cole- 
man, an aged and much loved member of Sharon church 
and society, died in January, 1913, at Wise. N. C. Those 
who knew her best say that the Society had no more con- 
secrated member or more earnest worker than she. She 
is greatly missed, but we feel that our loss is her gain. 

Mrs. M. V. Perry, Littleton, N. C, died September 7, 
1913. She was a woman of beautiful Christian character 
and a faithful member of the Woman's Missionary Soci- 
ety. 

On December 22, 1912, the Henderson Sunbep.rn Society 
lost in the death of Josie Royster, one of its best and 
most loyal members. "He shall gather the lanjbg in His 
arms and carry them in His bosom." 

MRS. J. M. GARDNER, ' 
MRS. J. T. MILLS, 

Committee. 

41 



Address on the Jubilate was made by Miss Hc'ik, of our 
Central Committee. 

The Committee on Plan of Work next gave their report. 

Report. 

We, the Committee on Plans of Work, submit the fol- 
lowing: 

1. That each Missionary Society of the Tar River As- 
sociation make a persistent effort to not only inoiease our 
membership 25 per cent, of the present number, bat enlist 
the sympathy and secure the co-operation of every 
woman in the church. 

2. That we commend tithing in every possible way; 
and that we adopt the "Standard of Excellence" for the 
State, namely, an increase in gifts of not less than 16 per 
cent, of last year's contributions. 

3. That we recommend a stronger personal effort be 
carried out in our work. We believe if we would give 
more of ourselves, time and money to our Ma^^tHr's cause 
the good results would be multiplied three-fold and the 
Lord's kingdom extended more rapidly. 

4. That each Society form at once a Mission Study 
Class, using one of the many splendid courses cf study 
mapped out for this purpose whereby we may acquire 
definite missionary knowledge, thereby making lis givers 
of ourselves and money to the work. 

5. That one or more of our magazines, viz: The For- 
eign Mission Journal, The Home Field, Our Mission 
Fields and Calendar of Prayer, be subscribed for in each 
home represented in our societies; also, a supp'y of the 
latest missionary information in the hands of each presi- 
dent of the societies for distribution. Also, to have an 
average attendance at regular meetings of a number 
equal to two-thirds of our membership. Being assured 
of the great blessings and inspiration derived .^rom at- 
tending our annual meeting, we urge that each ?-ociety be 
fully represented each year. 

6. Realizing and acknowledging our own deficiencies, 

42 



knowing and trusting in God's infinite wisdom and power, 
let us turn more earnestly and constantly to Him in 
prayer, asking His blessings on our work in all its phases. 
Let us join more heartily than ever in earnest prayer for 
the Central Committee and the officers of the Tar River 
Union. 

7. We recommend that a woman be appointed in each 
Union to hold a Woman's Missionary meeting at the same 
time and place that the regular fifth Sunday union meet- 
ing is held. Also that three representatives of the 
Woman's Missionary Union of the Tar River Ajsociation 
be appointed by the president to attend the meeting of 
the Tar River Association at Warrenton Octctber 7, 8 and 
9. We recommend, too, that special effort be rrade to or- 
ganize Y. W. A.'s, Royal Ambassadors, and ?5unbvam So- 
cieties. The percentage of our Young People's Societies 
is small compared to our Woman's Missionary So«':ieties. 

MRS. W. D. H0RN7']R, 
MRS. F. B. WIGGINS, 
MRS. B. C. HILLIARD, 

Conijnittee. 

On motion of Mrs. W. D. Horner, the Apportionment 
Committee was done away with. 

The report on Resolutions was then read, as follows : 
Report on Resolutions. 

Resolved, 1. That we, the delegates and visitors to the 
ninth annual session of the Woman's Missionary Union of 
the Tar River Association, uanimously extend Lo the peo- 
ple of Sharon church and community a heart:v vole of ap- 
preciation for their cordial welcome and generoii3 hospi- 
tality. 

2. We wish especially to thank the chau'man of the 
Hospitality Committee, Mrs. M. H. Hayes, for her suc- 
cessful efforts in behalf of our comfort and pleasure. 

3. We appreciate the splendid music wg have had 
throughout the services, and wish to thank taose who 
have had it in charge. 

43 



4. We are grateful to our Vice-President, Mrs. W. W. 
Parker, and to all who have contributed to tih^ success- of 

■■ this meeting in any way, and we have resolved to go back 
to our home societies with ''a heart for prayer and a mind 
to work." 

5. That we express our thanks and appreciation to 
Miss Sue Kelly, of Flat River Association, for her valua- 
ble assistance. 

6. That these resolutions be placed in the Minutes. 

MRS. J. T. MILLS, Ch m., 
MRS. B. C. JOHNSON, 
MRS. T. V. ALLEN, 

' Committee. 
Miss Kelly occupied the chair during the reading of the 
report on nominations, which was as follows: 
Report on Nominations. 
Fir Vice-President, Mrs. W. W. Parker, Henderson, 
N.'C. 

P'or Second Vice-President, Mrs. M. H. TIaves, Wise, 
N. C. 

For Third. Vice-President, Miss Lena A. V/hHe, Wise,- 
N. C. ■ "'"■'' 

For Secretary and Treasurer, Miss Heleti .' V/eldon, 
Norlina, N. C. 

MRS. W. D. HORNER. 
MRS. M. H. HAYES, 
MRS. R. L. BENNETT, 

Committee. 

The Committee on Time and Place next reported. 
Report on Time and Place, 

We, your Committee on Time and Place, submit the fol- 
lowing: 

That the W. M. U. of Tar River Association meet with 
the Society in Louisburg the last Thursday and Friday 
in September, 1914. 

44 



MRS. M. H. HAYES. Ch'm., 
-v -.^^ • MISS SUSIE GARDNEE, 

MISS ANNIE HARVEY, 
The following committee was appointed "l o attend the 
Tar River Association and confer with the pastors in re- 
gard to the work of the W. M. U., viz : 

Mrs; W. W. Parker, Mrs. J. M. Gardner, Mrs. J. T. Mills, 
Miss Helen Weldon and Mrs. J. A. Tunstall. 

The meeting adjourned with prayer by Miss Heck. 

List of Delegates. 

Brown's W. M. S.— Mrs. J. A. Tunstall, Mrs. J. W. 
Smithwock. 

Bunn W. M. S.— Mrs. B. C. Johnson, Miss Lena White. 

Gardner's W. M. S. — Miss Susie Gardner, Miss Lucy 
Shearin. 

Henderson W. M. S.— Mrs. T. M. Pittman, Mrs. W. D. 
Horner. 

Henderson Sunbeams — Mildred Wester, Lennie Elmore, 
Irvin Mangum. 

Littleton W. M. S. — Miss Annie Harvey. 

Louisburg W. M. S. — Miss Edna Allen, Miss Green. 

Macon W. M. S.— Mrs. Ethel Overby, Mrs. R. H. Clarke, 
Miss Mamie Coleman. 

Macon Sunbeams — Miss Minnie Rodwell. 

Middleburg W. M. S.— Mrs. R. L. Bennett, TMrs. J. R. 
Fleming. 

Middleburg Sunbeams — Miss Tazzie Parham. 

Norlina W. M. S.— Mrs. F. B. Wiggins. 

Peachtree W. M. S. — Miss Ximena Edwards, Miss Mag- 
nolia Pullen. 

Sharon W. M. S. — Miss Carrie Dunn, Miss Lf na White. 
Miss Mattie Hicks. 

•Vaughan W. M. S. — Mrs. G. A. Thoroughgood, Mrs. P. 
B. Skundberg, 

Vaughan Sunbeams — Miss Georgia Thoroughgood, 
Miss Gladys Thoroughgood, Master Olf Landsvich. 

45 



Warren Plains W. M. S.— Mrs. N. B. Weldon, Mrs. W. 
E. Hawks. 

Warrenton W. M. S.— Mrs. J. M. Gardner, Mrs. A. V. 
Weldon, Mrs. T. V. Allen. 

Gardner's Sunbeams — Miss Susie Gardner. 

Henderson First Baptist Y. W. A. — Mrs. W. W. Parker. 

Warren Plains Y. W. A. — Miss Mary Hawks, Miss 
Helen E. Weldon. 



4S 



FINANCIAL AND STATISTICAL REPORT 
Of the Vice-President of the Tar River Association W. M. U. 1912-13 



Woman's Nissionary Society. 



CHURCHES. 




a 

a; .2 


7j 


Louisville 
Training- 
schools 


T3 

3 


in 


"S 



u 
-a 




Eh 


Brown 

Bunn 


1 78 

6 20 

9 75 

25 68 

53 94 

5 30 
55 40 
27 00 
17 00 

6 95 
8 60 


14 80 
3 10 

"9"78 
40 80 

3 35 
23 34 
10 00 

"5 "so 

4 40 
2 05 

5 00 
25 

1 20 


4 65 

4 80 
2 75 

16 28 
67 02 

2 15 
22 15 
20 00 

5 00 

6 25 
8 00 

'§"40 

3 00 

4 52 




-- 


30 


1 00 


22 53 
14 10 


Bethesda 

Gardners .... 


60 
S 50 
1 85 
S 00 

"2 "60 


10 


"i"50 

"i"6o 


""2"00 
2 00 


12 50 
52 44 


Henderson .. 


167 26 


Joyners Chapel 

Littleton 

Louisburg 

Kittrell 


12 65 

109 39 

59 00 

22 00 


Macon . . 


21 70 


Middleburg 

Midway 


21 00 
2 05 


Mt. Zion 


'""'so 

3 10 
5 5U 

4 00 

5 00 
3 70 

25 00 

"4616 


7 40 


New Bethel 

Peach Tree ..... ... 

Philadelphia 


25 


- 






4 00 
8 82 

5 50 


Poplar Springs 

Sandy Creek 


8 95 
5 00 
S 70 

9 00 
1 76 

27 75 
1 70 
3 40 
1 35 


8 31 
16 00 

9 25 
5 SO 
3 48 

28 00 




50 


5 15 


26 91 
26 OO 


Sharon 

Vaughan 

Warren Plains.. . .. 

Warrenton ... 

White Level 


"6"o6 

""6"35 
' i'75 


-■ 


1 20 

5 60 
50 

2 70 
10 

40 





19 85 

51 lO 

5 74 

111 20 

1 80 


Castalia 


3 40 
1 30 


7 20 
4 40 


TOTAL 


315 50 


1^8 18 


239 51 


29 30 


10 


13 80 


10 15 


796 54 



Young Women's Christian Association. 



Corinth 

Henderson 


3 78 
7 00 


'4' 86 
1 00 


1 00 
7 00 


'"2'00 




... . 




4 78 
18 86 


Warren Plains . .. 








3 00 














TOTAL 


10 78 


S 86 


8 OOl 2 00 








26 64 



47 



FINANCIAL AND STATISTICAL REPORT. Continued. 



Sunbeans. 



; CHURCHES. 


Foreign 
Missions 


0)1 


State 
Missions 


Lo lisvilUe 
Training- 
school 


5 


'n 

o; 
■n 

a 




'3 
O 

£ 

o 


Total 


Gardners . _. - 


90 
8 30 


' 7 30 
1 00 

1 5B 


1 88 
5 20 








2 78 


Henderson . 

S Henderson . 




-- 


04 




20 84 
1 03 


Littleton 


4 11 
2 10 

75 
10 00 

75 


5 64 




-- 






11 33 


Macon ... 


2 10 


Middleburg 

Warrenton ._ . . 


1 95 
5 00 


5 25 
10 00 

'200 

67 

3 00 






1 00 





8 95 
25 00 


Kittrell 










75 


Ccirinth.- . - 










2 00 


A'aughan _ _ _ . 


2 75 


25 










3 67 


Eunn - 




.- 


- 




3 00 






17 05 




TOTAL 


29 66 


33 64 




-- 


1 04 




81 39 


GRAND TOTAL 355 94 211 ()9i281 1:^1 31 30 


10 14 84 


10 15 904 57 



Places of Meeting and Amounts Contributed by W. M. U. of the Tar 
River Association Since the Separation from the General Association: 

1. Warrenton, 1908 $ 668.70 

2. Louisburg,1909 . .. 612 31 

3. Macon, 1910 . . . 687.48 

4. Middleburg, 1911 .... 682.54 

5. Gardners, 1912.... .... 867.99 

6. Sharon, 1913 90^.57 

Total - .-.-..-$ 4,423.59 



43 



STATISTICAL TABLE 



CHURCHES 



Advance 

Bear Swamp 

Bethesda . _ 

Bethlehem _ 

Bobbitt's Chapel _. 

Browns 

Bunn 

Cary Chapel 

Castalia . . _ 

Cedar Rock 

Corinth . . . 

Cypress Chapel 

Enterprise 

Ephesus 

Fishing Creek _ . _ . . 

Gardners 

Henderson ... 

Harris Chapel .... 

Johns Chapel . 

Joyners Chapel . . . 

Kittrell ... 

Littleton 

Louisburg- . . 

Macon 

Maple Springs 

Marmaduke 

Middleburg 

Midway 

Mountain Grove.. 

Mt. Hebron 

Mt. Zion 

Mt. Olive 

New Bethel 

New Sandy Creek 

No. Henderson 

Norlina 

Peach Tree 

Philadelphia 

Popular Springs. . 
Quankie . 

Red Bud 

Reedy Creek 

Rock Springs. . _. 

Samaria 

Sandy Creek 

Sharon 

So. Henderson . . . 

Social Plains 

Sulphur Springs... 

Turkey Branch 

Vaughn ... . .. 

Warren Plains 

Warrenton 

White Level ._ 



PASTORS AND POST OFFICES 



B. Duckett 

N. W. Bobbitt, Littleton.. . 
K. W. Hogan, Wise ... . .. 

N. W. Bobbitt, Littleton... 

T. J Taylor, Warrenton 

N. W. Bobbitt, Littleton 

G. M. Duke, Mayleville. 

G. T. Tunstall, Henderson . 

G. W. May, Castalia 

G. M. Duke, Mapleville 

W. L. Griggs, Wake Forest. 
J. E. Hocutt, Nashville.. . 
A. P. Mustian, Warrenton . 
J. E. Hocutt, Nashville. _ 
N. W. Bobbitt, Littleton . . . 

K. W. Hogan, Wise 

A. P. Mustian, Warrenton . . 
S. L. Morgan, Henderson. . . 



CLERKS AND POST OFFICES 



M. D. Woodlief, Kittrell 

W. E. Bowers, Jr., Littleton. 
J. J. Watkins, Keats, Va... . 

C.O.King, Auralian... ... 

J. N. Tunstall, Manson, R 2 

H. A. Pope, Littleton 

G. A. Alford, Wakefield 

C. E. Hoyle, Henderson 

J. H. Boon, Castalia 

T. H. Sledge, Louisburg . . . . 

A. A. Dement, Louiiburg _.. 
E. S. Moore, Spring Hope _-. 
Fletcher Bobbitt, Littleton .. 
W. M. Warren, Spring Hope. 

J. R. Ward, Whitakers 

J. W. Shearin, Macon 

B. Y. Harriss, Essex . 

J. R. Teague, Henderson 



W. H. Hartsell, Middlesex 



A. B, Harrell, Littleton... 
W. M. Gilmore, Louisburg 
T. J. Taylor, Warrenton... 
G. M. Duke, Mapleville . _ . . 
W. Hartsell, Middlesex... 



W. 0. Rosser, Spring Hope. 
Jim. H. Harper, Louisburg 
J. W. Sledge, Louisburg.. .. 

G. M. Duke, Mapleville 

W. 0. Rosser, SpripgHope.. 

G. W. May, Castalia 

D. T. Bunn, Spring Hope . 
W. T. Tate, Wake Forest .. 
G. T. Tunstall, Henierson . 
W. 0. Rosser, Sprn<5 Hope.. 



G. M. Duke, Mapleville. .. . 
N. W. Bobbitt, Littleton 

G. M. Duke. Mapleville 

W. Hartsell, Middlesex... 
M. Stamps, Louisburg . . . _ . 
W. Hartsell, Middlesex... 
G. M. Duke, Mapleville . . . 
K. W. Hogan, Wise . 



B. F. Prince, Wakefield . ... 

C. H. Williams, Kittrell 

E. C. Bobbitt, Littleton 

Thos. P. Wilder, Louisburg . 

H. A. Nicholson, Macon 

J. H. Uzzle, Mapleville .. . . . 
M. T. Duke, Marmaduke . .. 
E. L. Fleming, Middleburg _-. 
J. N. Wester, Spring Hope . . 

T, J. Tharrington. Alert 

G. D. Griffin, Castalia .. 

G. C. Parish, Louisburg 

R. S. Cone, Spring Hope 

D. H. Dicken, Henderson ... 
S. P. Hicks, Henderson ... 
S. G. Walters, Henderson . . . 
R. S. Register, Norlina ... 
J. H. Edwards, Spring Hope. 



H. M. Mullen 

G. W. Green, Aurelian Springs. 

C. C. Murphy, Castalia 

Robt. Harri£s, Grove Hill 

M. C. WiMer, Louisburg 

T. B. Cone, Spring Hope 

J. R. Collins, Louisburg 

P. R. Perkinson, Wise 



J. W. Sledge, Louisburg . . . 

W. Hartsell, Middlesex 

A. G. Willcox, Brinkleyville . 

K. W. Hogan, Wise 

T. J. Taylor, Warrenton... . . . 

T.J. Taylor, Warrenton .. 
J. W. Sledge. Louisburg 



Total 



H. B. Hagwood, Wakefield . ... 

S. W. O'Neal, Elberon 

W. P. Thrower. Enfield 

W. H. Riggan, Vaughn 

W E. Hav/kes, Warren Plains. 

E. S. Allen, Warrenton .. 

J. T. Murphy, Louisburg 



3rd, 
4th, 
4th, 
3rd, 
2nd, 
3rd, 



4th. 
4th. 
3rd. 
2nd. 
1st. 
2nd, 4th. 
4th. 
2nd, 
2nd. 
1st, 



1st, 



3, 4 
3, 4 
4th. 
4th. 
3rd. 
3rd. 
2nd. 



05- 



>Ph 



600 
1000 
1000 

800 
2500 



2000 

2500 

120(1 

1000 

800 

lOOO 

900 

600 

250O 

1000 

20,000 



1000 
1000 
3000 
25,000 
900 
2000 



c o 
G3 o, 
COO 



300 
500 
300 
300 
250 



400 
500 
300 
600 
300 
400 
300 
300 
350 
300 
350 



500 



1st, 

1st. 

3rd. 

2nd, 4th. 



2nd. 



l3t. 

4th. 
4th. 
2nd. 4th. 
1st. 
3rd. 
1st, 4th. 



4th 
3rd 
2nd 
2nd 
1st, 3rd 



2000 
800 



1500 



1500 

800 

1300 

"iooo 



1200 

1500 
800 
1000 
1000 
1000 
7500 



300 

700 
300 
600 



300 
325 



500 

'350 

400 
400 

"300 



m 



10 



23 



5 
4 
5 
3 
8 
9 

3 
12 



250 

500 
500 
300 
450 
500 
450 



1500 
500 
TOGO 
1000 
2000 



1, 2, 3, 4! 11,000 
1st. I 1000 



300 
250 
300 
300 
300 
300 



500i 29 



112,600! 15,925 356 













FINANCIAL TABLE 


















1. 


CO 

15 

c 
a; 

c 


03 
<V 

c 
<v 
a. 

X 

W 


o 
o 

(U 

H 


03 

c 
o 

"ai 
tn 

d 

CO 

< 


CO 

a 

■^ CO 

c3_co 


CO 

C 

E ^ 


."2? ° 

U. CO 


a 
.2 

'to 

in 

i 

a.' 


■oo 

CO 

c 

CO 

x: 
a 

O 


-a 
c 
CO 

•OD O 
tu o 

o O 


CO 
3 

a 


2 c 

C 3 


01 

« c 
■M.3 


CO 

00 


J 
^ 
g 


) 00 
) 00 

155 


m 


12 00 

12 00 

5 17 

3 00 

1914 




"30"00 

" 5'00 

""eo'oo 


150 00 

is'so 

8 65 

'2800 
6 47 

" 4"81 

6 81 

10 00 

"3 "25 

2 50 

23 94 

130 06 

10 43 

' '4'75 

"87'32 
25 00 

9 60 
14 50 

' "l2 00 
2 26 

1 24 

2 82 
2 82 
4 32 
8 60 

""s'oo 

6 30 
1 00 


250 00 

'9'20 
3 50 

"" "8 02 
8 10 
31 88 
7 48 
2 25 
15 00 
2 98 

" 350 

2 76 

31 14 

132 96 


150 00 

'"611 

10 00 

2 88 

5 83 
" 54 

38 35 

6 52 
4 25 

28 00 
2 15 

'"""4'50 

10 00 
33 50 

169 37 

11 32 




500 

35 49 

1 40 




"i"6o 

1 50 
1 25 


"2"00 
4 80 
2 88 

4 31 

5 00 
7 35 
7 09 

'"2"30 

"5 00 
5 94 

29 75 
5 35 


i'oo 
"s'oo 

'2 '20 
3 25 
5 00 

"4 '50 

'3 68 

""§'31 


" "50"00 
18 00 

"13102 

"se'ss 

'""23"00 
34 50 

"'io'oo 

21 09 
65 76 
78 30 

22 00 

"75 00 

13485 
91 68 

22 00 
25 00 

23 26 

""""222 

"""i7"05 

""'447 
41 10 

""26"65 


1112 t 

268 ( 
191 { 
127 ( 
680 C 
311 6 
136 6 

2234 8 
251 5 
217 1 
334 8 
135 6 
167 
149 7 
206 6: 
869 8! 

3260 1; 
222 4J 

' 248 '4t 

"isoo'oc 

2916 5/ 
457 41 
400 Ot 
179 14 
333 92 
166 77 
63 38 
93 32 

213 02 
288 59 
469 85 

96 35 

661 00 

2256 35 

214 98 







5 72 

4 55 

75 00 

""""2'28 
9 07 










1 00 
1 00 
1 50 

1 50 

2 00 

3 00 
1 00 
1 50 

1 30 

2 00 
5 00 
2 00 


) 00 

i 00 


25 00 
c 00 
5 00 

32 60 


To'cib 

33 80 

30 00 


'ii"85 


25 00 
40 Ot' 
35 00 
5 17 
27 50 
15 00 
12 50 
25 00 
2Q 00 
100 00 
35 0( 


) 00 








"5"6o 


"""iooo 

3 50 

20 00 

200 04 

3 80 


"550 










r94 

I 50 


6 00 

12 10 

312 62 


4 50 
46 00 
97 76 


"4"86 
17 32 










\ 00 








5 or 

200 00 
40 00 
75 00 
17 50 
20 00 
12 00 

7 50 
10 00 
23 50 
10 00 
50 00 

5 00 

"is'oo 

25 00 


2 00 

'"'57 16 

460 28 

29 68 

10 00 

3 00 
20 00 

6 10 
60 

"""453 

6 50 

27 53 

"""5 00 

5 00 

12 95 


3 00 

"'64'91 

238 35 

35 14 

15 00 
3 00 

20 00 
8 87 

'"""425 

7 50 

100 00 

10 60 

10 00 

16 05 
10 35 


""6"82 
8 07 

'2'00 


15 45 

"10113 

162 50 

49 44 

110 00 

5 88 

27 80 


46"6o 


1 00 

"200 
3 00 
5 00 

2 00 
1 50 

1 00 
80 
50 

2 00 
1 50 

"2'5o 

1 00 


12 00 

"'3'30 

30 00 

8 00 

3 00 

ifoo 

2 92 
2 00 


2 20 

'2'26 
30 00 
10 00 

5 08 

3 00 

6 12 


'"08 

"50 
00 
00 
25 
00 
00 


'i34'64 

229 17 

25 50 

10 00 

3 00 

' '1230 


'6"2"4'0 

154 02 

12 00 

i6"6o 


"Tis 

27 00 
25'6o 






70 
"i 30 


84 

2"35 

"2615 

' '5"00 

' i"45 


"'i'85 

"s'oo 




11 45 
16 10 




1 91 

2 00 
5 00 


3 72 
2 00 


17 00 


34 47 




40 00 

""""fso 


55 00 
39 00 


35 00 
'"8"60 




2 00 
2 00 








1 83 




"oo 

70 
50 


""' fss 






""io"oo 

25 OO 
15 00 
20 00 
40 00 
40 00 
20 00 

'""s'oo 

12 51 
36 50 
12 00 
25 00 
60 00 
10 00 


' "4'00 
2 75 

10 'oo 

6 86 
30 55 

6'35 


""io'oo 

" ""2'53 

""i5'oo 

9 90 
19 40 

'" "2"6o 


'"""5'00 

1 00 

2 94 
91 00 
17 68 


---- 


'"""265 
3 00 

" "62"00 

50 00 


"ie'oo 
"e'oo 

10 00 
50 35 


""50 
2 00 
1 25 

1 00 

2 50 

3 56 
2 00 

"Too 

1 00 
30 

1 50 

2 00 

""i'so 


""5"00 
"'2"i4 


"'i'65 


"is'c'o 

10 00 
58 65 
31 83 

5 00 
45 70 

""'is'is 

6 50 
15 52 
35 00 

4 90 


"i38'83 
155 65 
152 61 

403 79 


5 00 

6 00 
8 44 

28 06 


is'is 


23 00 

""s'oo 


5 00 
4 00 
9 00 

'2"61 


467 72 
185 32 


50 

"oo 

09 
"70 


15 00 
""""5"00 

"'"45"50 

258 9V 

23 00 


20 00 

'i2'23 
2 11 

10 00 
20 00 
77 62 
15 00 


10 00 
25"6o 

""§'95 
1 50 


12 50 
""'2"50 




45 40 

' "'2"00 

10 00 

6 00 

17 00 

74 00 

257 57 

2 45 


622 55 

' i04"46 
175 89 


16 50 

9 50 

IS 00 

67 00 

2 45 


10 00 
13 61 
15 00 
71 70 


10 00 

26 04 

20 00 

142 50 


"i'65 

"s'oo 


5 00 

"20"C0 
25 00 


5 26 

3 10 

5 00 

10 00 


153 17 
253 04 
430 00 
2694 81 
129 40 










1221 06 


878 27 


194 38 


1278 68 


753 92 


1326 24 


1273 50 


30 54 


1415 31 


134 70 


74 01 


218 04 


144 77 


1217 05 


27503 79 



































SUNDAY SCHOOL TABLE 



CHURCHES 


SUPERINTENDENTS AND 
POSTOFFICES. 


Officers and 
Teachers. 


CO 

u 
_cfl 

"o 

SS 

y 
73 


c 

6 

o c 
HW 


o 
j= 
o 

C/3 

o 
6 


c 
a 

O oj 


c 

<X> CO 

> S 

<< 


to' 

..0.2 


Contributions 
for Missions, 
Orphanage, etc 


CO 

II 

(WW 


to 

C 
^0 

3 

JO 

e25 


Advance 

Bear Swamp 

Bethesda .. . 

Bethlehem _ 

Bobbitt's Chapel , . 
Browns 


J. W. Johnson, Kittrell 

J. W. Bowers, Littleton 

R. S. Watkins, Manson 

J.C.Jenkins, Aurelian Sp'gs. 


4 
5 
6 
5 


40 
50 
36 
11 


44 
55 
42 
16 




12 

12 

9 

8 


25 
35 
20 


' "3 


$ 

5 00 
35 49 


12 00 

12 00 

5 17 

3 00 

19'l4 

"25"60 


13 00 
17 00 

40 66 
3 0(^ 






3415 
96 50 
37 00 




S. L. Bobbitt, Henderson, R2 

J. N. Perry 

A. N. Hoyle, Henderson _ . 
S. J. Bartholomew, Castalia 

Taylor Boon, Louisburg 

J. G. Tulgium, Louisburg . _ 
Jo«l Wilder, Spring Hope . 
E. L. Hale, Littleton... . . 

H. E. Rodwell, Macon 

W. N. Mabrey, Essex 

Jas. I. Meller, Henderson 

J. N. Massey, Wakefield . . 
Mrs. C. N. Williams, Kittrell 
W. G. Coppersmith, Littleton 

[vey Allen, Louisburg 

J. L. Colman, Macon .. 

J. W. Strange, Mapleville.. 

M C. Duke, Marmaduke 

R.L.Bennett, Middleburg.. 
A. N. Edwards, Spring Hope 
T. N. Tharrington, Alert . . 

G. D. Griffin, Louisburg 

J. M. Strickland, Spring Hope 
J. N. Harper, Louisburg . . 

W. B. Daniel, Henderson 

S. P. Hicks, Henderson . 
W. B. Clopton, Henderson 

J. W. Adcock, Norlina 

Johnnie Bunn, Spring Hope 

John B. Parrish. Castalia . 
C. N. Hardy, Aspen 
J. B. Welder, Louisburg 
J. T. Morgan, Middlesex 
A. N. Joyner, Louisburg . . 
C. W. Parkinson, Wise. 


7 
6 
8 

10 

11 

6 

7 

5 

"""'8 

6 

12 

8 
3 

10 

13 
8 

11 
6 

10 
6 
8 

9 
12 
11 

7 

8 

10 

7 

8 
10 

7 
15 

9 

8 


46 

105 
115 
121 

85 
137 

50 

"iTi 

66 
163 

"l60 
30 
73 
201 
52 
76 
32 
60 
98 
78 
75 

"136 

102 

93 

150 

138 

74 

"82 
75 
82 

169 

107 


53 
180 
113 
125 
132 

91 
142 

55 

'119 

72 

175 

"^"168 

"83 

214 

60 

87 

38 

70 

104 

86 

71 

84 

148 

113 

100 

158 

148 

81 

'90 

85 

89 

184 

"ll5 

57 

34 

90 

135 

131 

196 




12 


29 
135 

" '80 
62 

50 
25 

"65 

42 

124 

'160 

'"51 
122 
40 
31 
27 
40 
61 
60 
27 
55 
85 
52 

"'"96 
65 
30 

115 
"55 

'37 

55 

67 
75 


9 

2 

2 

12 

7 
2 

"12 

'" "20 

2 

14 
4 

18 
4 

5 
3 

.... 

8 
13 

10 

1 
15 


53 29 

96 50 


Gary Chapel 

Castalia . 

Cedar Rock 

Corinth ... 

Cypress Chapel 

Enterprise 

Ephesus . . , 

Fishing Creek . 

Gardners 

Henderson 

Harris Chapel ... 

Johns Chapel 

Joyners Chapel . . . 

Kittrell.^. 

Littleton 

Louisburg- 

Macon 

Maple Springs .. 

Marmaduke 

Middleburg 

Midway 

Mountain Grove.. 

Mt. Hebron 

Mt. Zion . 

Mt. Olive 

New Bethel . . . 
New Sandy Creek 

No. Henderson 

Norlina . . . 

Peach Tree . 

Philadelphia 

Popular Springs. _ 

Quankie 

Red Bud . 

Reedy Creek 

Rock Springs 


1 

1 
2 
1 


12 
12 

12 
12 

"12 

12 

11 

12 

...... 

'"12 
12 
12 
12 
6 
12 
12 
12 

'12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
8 

5 
9 
6 


62 00 


38 80 

14 00 

3 23 

.... -. 

"20 00 

i98 97 

25 00 

104 75 
120 92 
U 32 
11 50 
2 00 
10 00 
30 59 

1 10 

13 47 

14 00 

1 00 
' 14 00 

"10 00 

"21 07 

17 0;) 


16 00 

5 97 
25 00 

46 00 
U 47 
97 76 

16 '00 

62 "40 

154 02 

12 00 

23 84 

4 17 
16 00 

6 46 

11 45 

16 60 
20 00 

8 00 
55 00 
25 00 

3 50 

500 

5 00 
8 44 

28 06 

20 60 

1223 
2 11 

10 00 
20 00 
77 62 
15 00 


36 80 
30 00 

9 20 

25 00 

' "66 00 

14 47 

296 62 

3500 

167 15 

274 94 

33 32 

35 04 

4 17 

26 00 

37 05 

11 45 

16 72 

17 10 
33 47 

8 00 
55 00 
39 00 

3 50 

5 CO 

6 00 
8 44 

42 06 


Sandy Creek 

Sharon ... 

So Henderson 


1 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 


12 

'12 
6 

12 
12 
12 
12 


"""7r94 


Social Plains .... 
Sulphur Springs. . . 
Turkey Branch 

Vaughn . 

Warren Plains . . 

Warrenton _ . 

White Level 


J. A. Shephard. Elbern... 

W. P. Thrower, Enfield 

J. D. Riggan, Vaughn 

W.E. Hawks, Warren Plains 
A. D. Harriss, Warrenton . 
D.E.Aycock, Louisburg, R4 


""8 

6 

9 

15 

10 

9 


49 

28 

81 

120 

121 

187 


22'23 
2 11 

3i 07 

37 00 

323 44 

15 00 




TOTAL 


367 


3905 


4332 


41 




2032 


1761 789 83 913 41] 


2134 72 



^ 






OF THE 

Tar River Ass 

1914 



CONTAINING THE 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Eighty-fourth Session 



%:i 






M 



m 

M 

m 

%» 

M 



HELD WITH THE'. 



M 



m 



Church at Ephesus, Nash County, N. C. 
October 6th and 7th, 1914. 



The next session to be held with the Church at Rock Spring, 
Franklin County, (eight miles west oi Louisburg) on Tuesday after fn^^^ 
Sur>day in October, 1915. 

To preach Introductory Sermor>, S. L. Morgan; . ..' 
Green. 



m 



OFFICER: 

Rev. G. M. Duke, Moderator 

Rev. A. G. Willcox, Clerk and Treasuy - 



;.>!evll!c:, N, C 
K-ryville, N. C. 



* 






KHs5% ^^ tm« liv'R ws;w^i%)r^ 



f A^v 



OF THE 



iar Kiver Association 

1914 



CONTAINING THE 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Eighty-fourth Session 



HELD WITH THE 



Church at Ephesus, Nash County, N. C. 
October 6ih and 7th, 1914. 



The next session to be held with the Church at Rock Spring, 
rranklin Count}', (eiglit miles west of Louisburg) on Tuesday after first 
Sunday in October, 1915. 

To preach Introductory Sermon, S. L. Morgan; Alternate, W. M. 
Green, 



OFFICERS: 

Rev. G. M. Duke, Moderator Maplcville, N. C. 

Rev. A. G. Willcox, Clerk and Treasurer Brinkleyville, N. C. 



ORDER OF BUSINESS FOR 1915. 

Tuesday- A. M. 

11.00 — Introductory sermon, organization, appointment of committees. 
12.30 — Adjourn for dinner. 



Tuesday, P. M. 



1,80— Periodicals. 

2,00 — Orphanage. 

2.30 — Aged ministers. 

3.00 — Corportage. 

3.80 — Woman's work, 

3.45 — Miscellaneous business. 

4.00 — Adjourn, 



Wednesday, A, IKL 



9.00 — Devotional meeting. 

9.30 — Sunday schools, 
10.00 — State missions. 
10.45 — Associational missions. 
12.00 — Adjourn for dinner. 



Wednesday, P, DL 

1 .30 — Systematic beneficence, 

2.15^ — Home missions. ^ 

3.00 — Foreign missions. 

3.45 — Miscellaneous business. 

4.00 — Adjourn. 

Thursday, A. M. 

9.00 — Devotional meeting; 

9.80 — Temperance. i 

• 9.45 — Education. 
10.4.5 — Miscellaneous business^. 
11.30 — Adjournment.. 

i ' T. ALLEN, 

'^ ; For Committeei. 



PASTORS AND POSTOFFICES. 

Barnes, J. H Wake Forest 

Bobbitt, W. W .Littleton 

Coppege, G. W. ............. , .Henderson 

Duke, G. M -.Maplevme 

Gay, W. R .Wake Forest 

Greggs, W. L. . . . . . . . ................... . ........ . . . . . . . .Wake Forest 

Gilmore, W. M. .Louisburg 

Hafrell, A. B.. Louisburg. 

Harriss, J. P .Middleburg 

Hartsell, Wallace. ■. . . ; Bunn 

Hartsell, Pslul ....... v ;................ .Wake Forest 

Harper, J. H , ...;................; Louisburg 

Harrington, W. D ........:.. .Wake Forest 

Hocutt, J. E ......;..........;..... .ISashville 

May, G. W.. , .Castalia 

Mustean, A. P. . . ^ . . . . . . ....;..;.....;.......;.;..;... Essex 

Morton, W. B Louisburg 

Morgan, S. L.. ..... > ;.....,.._.............;.......,. .Henderson 

>;elson, E. R Henderson 

Rosser, W. ; ;...... Spring Hope 

Sledge, J, W i ........;., . Lc uisburg 

Taylor, T. J Warrenton 

Willcox, A. G Brinkiey villd 

J. J. Marshall, Missionary Pastor, Macoii, >l. C. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

To Write on Periodicals — ^ ^ ' ~ 

To Write on Aged Ministers W. B. Morton 

To Write on Orphanage Ivey Allen 

To Write on Education J. M. Beam 

To Write on Woman's Work .A. P. Mustian 

To Write on Periodicals T. H Sledge 

To Write on Sunday Schools R. S. Register 

To Write on Foreign Missions T. J. Taylor 

To Write on Home Missions W. M. Gilmore 

To Write on Assoil. Missions G. M. Duke 

To Write on State Missions. . , A. B. Harrell 

To Write on Colportage J. J. Marshall 

To Write on Temperance T. B. Weldon 

Executive Committee, T. J. Taylor, G. M. Duke, Ivey Allen, T. M. Pit- 
man, J. M. Gardner. 

Sunday School Committee, W. B. Morton, J. R. Rodwell, W. G. Copper- 
smith. 



P?^OCEEDINGS 



Ephesua, October 6th, 1914. 

The Tar River^ Association met with this churcli today in its 84th 
annual session, and was called to order by Moderator G. M. Duke at 11 
o'clock. After ainging a hymn Rev. George Coppedge led in prayer. 
The introductory sermon was preached by Bro. J. J. Marshall; text, 
Matt. 16:18 and 28:18-20. The roll of churches was called and dele- 
gates enrolled as follows: 

Advance — By letter. 

Bearswamp — Henry Cromley, W. E. Bowers, Wiley Bowers. 

Bethesda — 

Bethlehem — C. 0. King. 

Bobbitts Chapel— Rev. W. N. Bobbitt. 

Browns— T. J. Taylor. 

Bunn— G. C. Pippin, J. H. Odum, B. M. C. Mullen. 

Gary Ghapel — 

Gastalia— G. W. May, Z. H. Wheless, Wilier May. 

Cedar Rock— T. H. Sledge 

Corinth— W. A. Falkner, R. D. Pinnell. 

Cypress Chapel— Arthur Wilder, Arthur Stallings, Frank Gay. 

Enterprise — Fletcher Bobbitt, Frank Harris, Dorcey Wright. 

Ephesus, J. R. Collins, L. M. Edwards, J. D. Abernathy. 

Fishing Creek — W. "W. Sosser. 

Gardners — V. G. Shearin. 

Henderson — S. L. Morgan. 

Harriss Chapel — B. C. Hamlet, D. L. Shearin. 

Joyners Chapel — D. C. Peace. 

Kittrell— By letter. 

Littleton— By letter. 

Louisburg — Ivey Allen, J. W. Hollingsworth, R. C. Taylor. 

Macon — F. A. Lancaster, W. L. Loyd. 

Maple Springs — A. W. Perry, W. E. Strong, B. E. Champion. 

Marmaduke — J. H. Duke. 

Middleburg— Letter. 

Midway — J. O. Bowden, C. J. Bowden, R. A. Bowden. 

Mount Grove — By letter. 

jMount Hebron— J. M. Wilder. 

Mount Zion— G. P. Foster, W. D. D. May. 

Mount Olive— J. M. Strickland, J. D. Strickland, R. S. Cone. 

New Bethel— By letter. 

New Sandy Creek — 

No. Henderson — Walter Tyndall, G. H. Parrish. 

Norlina — J. W. Adcock, R. S. Register. 

Peach Tree— D. T. Bonn, S. C. Edv/ards, H. Rix Edwards. 
Philadelphia— C. P. Harper, W. B. Bunting, C. H. Parish 
Poplar Sprin.'rs— B. R. Perry, C. T. Cheaves, W- H. Lucas. 



Quankie — By letter. 

Eed Bud— f . S. Collie. 

Eeedy Creek — T. A. Harriss, B. P. Robinson. 

Rock SprinfT — Wm. Fedler, J. L. Choaves, W. G. Pridgen. 

Samaria — B. 0. Cone, J. T. Moran, C. H. Murray . 

Sandy Creek — D. N. Nelms. 

Sharon — By letter. 

So. Henderf5on— B. B. Collins, S. B. Eobortson. 

Social Plains— J. T. Alford, W. 0. Whittey, C4. A. Hagwood. 

Sulphur Springs — R. E. Aycock, A. L. Aycock. 

Turkey Branch — John Lucas, J T. Sexton. 

Vaughn — J. J. Marshall. 

Warren Plains — C. T. Frazier. 

Y/arronton — T. J. Taylor. 

White Level — D. P. Pearce. 

The Association was permaneiiLly organized by the selection of for- 
mer officers — G. M. Duke, moderator, and A. G. Willcox, clerk and treas- 
urer. 

On invitation of moderator for new cliurches Conterville and Ivey 
presented their letters, which were referred to following committe: 
Jno. Sledge, Wallace Hartsell and A. P. Mustian. The following vis- 
itors: Arch. Johnson, representing orphanage, and J. S. Farmer, of 
Biblical Recorder, were welcomed. Rev. G. W. Ferrell and Anderson, of 
Free Will Baptist, were Vi'elcomed and made brief addrsss. Bro. J. E. 
Hocutt, pastor of church, welcomed delegates and visitors, which was 
responded to by Bro G. W. Coppedge. Bro. Gilmore, representing home 
field, and Bro. T. J. Taylor, representing foreign mission Journal, made 
brief announcements. Adjourned for dinner. 

Tuesday, 2. P. M. 

Association upon reassembling was led in prayer by Bro. Bobbitt. 

Periodicals. 
To the Tar River Association: 

We point with pride and joy to the periodicals of our denomination, 
especially those published in our own state. We should remember to 
show our appreciation of the work being done by these periodicals, and 
let us encourage and urge all of our members to read and enthusiastic- 
ally support them. They are ably and wisely edited, and if properly 
read and supported will serve as great agencies for enlightening and 
unifying our forces. 

Perhaps the best and most important of these periodicals is the 
Biblical Recorder. It is a faithful exponent of the truth as Baptists 
see it, and wherever it goes it serves as a potent factor in prod\icing 
an ideal type of Christian citizenship. It is the best medium through 
which iMorth Carolina Baptists can keep in touch with each other. 

Charity and Children grows better as the editor grows older. From 
week to week its pages sparkle and gleam with bright and pungent 



truths. It is an easy matter to f^ot the people who read this paper 
to help in supporting the Thomasville Orphanage. 

Then, too, our members should be urged to read the Foreign Mission 
Joitrnal, of Richmond, Va., and the Home Field, of Atlanta, Ga. These 
journals create a wholesome, Christian influence and stimulate men 
and women to do God's service. 

Respectfully submitted. 

J. W. SLEDGE. 

Report on periodicals prepared by Bro. J. W. Sledge was read by the 
clerk, and after remarks by Bros. J. S. Farmer, Bobbitt and Sledge re- 
port was adopted. 

Report on Orphanage. 

We look Math throbbing heart and mind back to November 11, 1885, 
for that was our natal day at Thomasville. 

It was the day when, like our loving Savior, we took little children 
in our arms and blessed them. It has been an inspiration to most of 
our people for these 29 years, and why it has not been to all is because 
they pressed not the child to their heart. 

We have enrolled 1,500 children diu-ing these years. We have 500 
there now, and there arc others waiting to be received. They are as 
needy as those who are being cared for, and we must build to receive 
them. 

IS early half of our current fund comes from our monthly Sunday 
school collections, and only about one-third of our Sunday schools are 
making monthly collections. We sincerely wish the other two-thirds 
would come up to the help of the children, and thus be i: blessing and 
be blessed themselves. 

We have now about 1,000 acres of land, and we need equipment to 
cultivate and care for it. The farm and garden have not amoiinted to 
a great deal this year on accoimt of the drouth. We will therefore have 
to give more liberally to cover the loss. 

The Kennedy Memorial Home and the Galoway gifts only increase 
our responsibilities and enlarge our need. Hence we need to rise in 
our love for growing children to the task God has set us by lengthen- 
ing our cords. Now, let us strengthen our stakes. We put forth 
much effort to insure health and development of body, mind and spirit. 

Work in the field, shoe shop, printing press, sewing and cooking is 
done to train hand and head. Every house and yard is kept in a 
sanitary condition. The school work is very efficient and discipline is 
excellent. 

The moral atmosphere is of the best, and is felt wherever an orphan 
makes his home. 

We have church service and Sunday school that the spirit may be 
taught and developed along with the body and mind. 

Late years have shown that our people remember the orphan on 



Thanksgiving. We hope that they will make a very liberal offering 
this year, for we are getting behind. 

Charity and Children is a liberal contributor to the orphanage, and 
every Sunday school ought to take a club of the paper so as to in- 
crease its contributions. It is a very readable sheet, and will help 
any person who peruses it. It has an efficient job plant connected with 
it, and we wish it great success. Respectfully submitted. 

G. W. MAY. 

Bro. G. W. May read report on orphanage and spolze to the report. 
He was followed by Bro. Arch Johnson, editor of Charity and Children, 
and a collection was taken for orphanage, amounting to $21.15, and 
the report was adopted. 

There being no report on ministerial relief, T. J. Taylor offered the 
following resolution: "We heartily commend the work of aiding aged 
and infirm ministers and ministers' widows. We also urge our churches 
to make a Christmas offering to this purpose." After remarks by 
various brothers and a cash collection amounting to $8.55, the resolu- 
tion was adopted. 

Report on Temperance. 

The very fact that victories continue to be added to the list of 
M'agers of the battle against the liquor business is very encouraging. 
Only the 23rd of September, 1914, did the great state of Virginia vote 
the liquor traffic out of her borders. Many North Carolina Christian 
}nen and women have joined the Virginia praying people in prayer 
that prohibition should sweep over their state, and, thank God, Vir- 
ginia is dry! 

The saloon has been voted out of 10 states of the Union because it 
is a failure. In every other state, with three exceptions, the people 
have driven the dram shop out of large sections of their states, because 
the license system has proven a failure. In several other states the 
people are going to vote the rum shops out in the near future, because 
these shops are a failure. 

Tliis business of licensing saloons to make failures and then having 
to take care of these same failures in the jails and poorhouses is be- 
ing recognized as nothing short of a crime. 

At a meeting of our state medical society this past summer in Ra- 
leigh it was agreed upon by the leading physicians of our state to put 
their influence against the use of liquor in the practice of medicine. If it 
is not good to use in sickness, then certainly healthy people don't 
need it. There is a great hope that we shall have nation-wide pro- 
hibition within the next 10 years. 

North Carolina ought to prohibit liquors being shipped into our 
state, and this appeal comes from our best people all over the state, 
asking our lawmakers to pass this act in the next legislature of North 
Carolina. We should preach temperance and pray for it until the 
victory is won. 

W. L. GRIGGS, for Committee. 



Report on temperance was read by Bro. Gilinoro for Ero. Griggs and 
was discussed by Bro. Johnson, and after the following resolution by 
Bro. Ivey Allen, "Resolved, That the Tar River Association indorse the 
action of the Anti- Saloon League in urging the legislature to enact a 
law preventing the importation of liquor to any point in North Caro- 
lina," the report Avas adopted. 

Report of Missionary Corporteur for year ending October 6tli, 1914: 

We are glad to report that this branch of the work has grown 
along all lines. 

I'J umber of churches visited this year 19 

Mission stations served 1 

Number of sermons preached 59 

Number of religious tracts distributed 3,010 

Number of Bibles sold .' 70 

^Number of Testaments sold 117 

!N umber of volumes of religious literature 129 

Besides the above I have added several names to our Recorder family. 

I wish to report some of the visible results of my ministry. There 
have been 36 professions of faith in meetings in which I have been 
actively engaged. Of this number 7 have been baptized at the War- 
renton mill, the mission point that I serve regularly. 

Financial compensation has been received as follows: 

Profit on literature $150.74 

Free will ofTerings 107.06 

Appropriation from mission board 75.00 

Total .$332.80 



We believe that this ptiase of our work should be broadened and 
strengthened, with a view to saving the lost and improving our church 
membership. Our laity, as well as our ministry, need the training 
that comes from the study of this kind of literature to fit them foi 
more efficient service. Paul said: 

"Study to show thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth 
not be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth." 

J. J. MARSHALL. 

Bro. J. J. Marshall offered his report on colportation. After some re- 
marks by Bro. Marshall the report was adopted. 
To the Tar River Association: 

The Woman's Missionary Union of our association has moved for- 
Avard by leaps and bounds during the associational year now closing. 

The brethren of our association, realizing the ever-increasing re- 
sponsibility a,nd importance of the Woman's Missionary Union, de- 
cided to lend a helping hand to tlie work. This Avas done in part by 
contributing $100 to employ a splendid young v>'oman (Miss Sue Kelly^ 
to work in our association during the months of April and May. A 
partial result of her work is shown in the report below. 



During the two months Miss Kelly worked amons; our women she 
organized 26 W. M. S. and 7 Sunbeams Bands. She held 53 meetings, 
distributed 1,501 leaflets, wrote 35 letters and cards, and traveled 705 
miles. Fine reports have come in of the excellent work she did. 

During the year now closed there have been organized 26 W. M. S. 
and 10 Sunbeam Bands. 

Last year the Woman's Missionary Union reported 28 W. M. S., 9 
Sunbeams and 3 Y. W. A., with a contribution of $904.57. 

They now report 50 W. M. S., 20 Sunbeams and 3 Y. W. A., and a 
contribution of $1,109.84, a gain of $205.27, and almost double the num- 
ber of societies, 40 last year and 73 this. 

One new feature the union is undertaking is to have two circulating 
missionary libraries, which they hope to secure and have ready for 
use during the coming year. Any book contributed would be thank- 
fully received. In the estimation of your committee a missionary 
library would be of great help to the union, since many of the churches 
lack a leader in this work. The books would broaden their min' and 
help to open their eyes. 

We now have heard a report of some of the results accomplished by 
the W. M. U. during this year, this partly being due to help received 
from the brethren. We would most earnestly urge that the association 
stand firmly by the union, doing at least as much as we did during 
the past year and more if possible. 

WALLACE HARTSELL. 

Report on Woman's Work was read by Bro. Hartsell, and after re- 
marks by several brethren the report was adopted. 

Committee of time, place and preacher appointed as follows: G. W. 
May, Wallace Hartsell and T. S. Collie. 

Adjourned. Prayer by Bro. Morgan. 

Second Day — Morning Session. 
The association was called to order at 9.30 o'clock and was led in 
prayer by Bro. Coppedge. The minutes were read and approved. Com- 
mittee on new churches reported as follows: 

"We, the committee on new churches, report favorably as to Center- 
ville and Inez churches, and recommend that they be received into the 
association. 

"J. W. SLEDGE, 
"A. P. MUSTIAN, 
"WALLACE HARTSELL, 

"Committee." 

Moderator gave right hand of fellowship to delegate. 

Education. 
We note with interest the great progress made in education the past 
few years. 

Our legislature two years ago passed two acts that have made the 



educating of our boys and girls more feasible than heretofore. 

Our rural pupils imder a six months' law have a much greater op- 
portunity to prepare themselves for high school, and the compulsory 
law will make possible a chance for those who have been kept at home 
by parents who were not interested in education. We believe the steps 
taken by our legislature will mean for us a better educated citizenship. 
Such progress in general education means that a corresponding increase 
in ministerial education is necessary. The preacher should be the first 
man in thought, a wise leader and a safe counsellor. To such an end 
he must be a trained man. The Board of Education reported two years 
ago more ministers in Wake Forest than were before at any one time 
in the history of the college, and more last year than the preceding 
year. 

Th(!re is perhaps a greater demand for trained preachers than ever 
before, and since we have increased our number and the majority are 
almost entirely dependent upon the board, we must increase our contri- 
butions or decrease our allowance for the men. 

There are young women at Meredith in training who need our help. 
Let us join hands and stand by all of our denominational schools of the 
state. Respectfully submitted. 

A. P. MUSTIAM. 

(By request.) 

Report on education was prepared and read by Bro. A. P. Mustian, 
and Dr. Carstarphen, of Wake Forest, followed in an address, and the 
report was adopted. 

Sunday Schools. 

More and more our people are coming to realize the supreme value 
of the work done by our Sunday schools in kingdom building. Started 
primarily to teach the Bible to the children, the Sunday school is now 
recognized as the teaching service of the church, and is a tremendous 
factor for the training of the entire membership. It is the plant bed 
of the church. Through its influence the church receives its strongest 
and best recruits. 

In Simday school work our Baptist people were pioneers, and are 
still the leaders in this great movement.. 

Notable progress has been made in recent years. The last report 
made by our efficient Simday school secretary, E. L. Middleton, of 
Raleigh, showed that there were 1,934 Baptist Sunday schools in this 
state, there being only 195 churches without Sunday schools; but we 
are sorry to report that of that number 9 are found in the Tar River 
Association. 

Our slogan should be a Sunday school in every church in the associa- 
tion, and not only so, but a better one with the splendid equipment that 
is now in easy reach of all, there is no sufficient reason why we should 
not attain to the highest point of efficiency. 

Our Sunday school board at Isashville, Tenn., and the Sunday school 

10 



department of our state mission board are ready to help any school 
that desires it, with the very best Sunday school literature on the 
market, and with expert men in holding Sunday school institutes for 
teacher training, etc. 

We would recommend the holding of many such institutes within 
our association this year as may be practicable, and to that end we 
would suggest that the moderator appoint an efficient committee to 
arrange for it. 

We would recommend also the adoption of the convention's plan of 
organized adult Bible classes, the Berean class for young men, and the 
Fidelis class for young women. 

We would urge that every church make a census of its territory and 
leave no stone unturned in enlisting its entire membership and as 
many others as possible in the work of the Sunday school. 

We would urge, further, that our pastors and leaders in the churches 
organize teacher training classes where practicable, for more efficient 
service. 

N.W.BOBBITT. 

Report on Sunday schools was read by Bro. Gilmore for the com- 
mittee, and after interesting addresses the report was adopted. 

The hour for special order having arrived, the report on associational 
missions was read by Bro. Ivey Allen. 

Report on Associational Missions, Including the Report of the Executive 

Committee. 

The committee made the following appropriations for associational 
missions: 

For Bethesda $50.00 

For Norlina 100.00 

For Centerville 75.00 

For Inez 75.00 

For Alsop's Chapel 100.00 

For Shosh 25.00 

For North Henderson 00.00 

For South Henderson 90.00 

For Kittrell 125.00 

For Mount Olive 75.00 

For Advance 75.00 

For Colportage and Warrenton Cotton Mill 75.00 

For Woman's Work 100.00 

At Bethesda, ISlorlina and Kittrell Bro. Nelson has labored earnestly 
and he is enthusiastic in his report of the work at Bethesda and Nor- 
lina. At Kittrell's the work is not so encouraging. Bro. Coppedge has 
organized churches at both Centerville and Inez, and feels that the 
outlook is encouraging at both places. 

At South Henderson the work under Bro. Harrington is progressing 
finely, about 75 members having been added during the year, mostly by 

11 



baptism. At North Henderson the visible results have not been so 
great, yet the outlook is hopeful. At present the church is without a 
pastor. 

At Shosh there is no church, but Bro. Harper is doing a good work. 

Bro. Hartsell is pastor at Mount Olive, where he has recently held 
a good meeting, and they are preparing to build a good house. 

Bro. Wilcox has been preaching at Alsop's Chapel. They have a 
splendid Sunday school and have held a meeting from the results of 
which 10 have been added by baptism, and they are ready to organize 
a church, if deemed wise. 

Bro. Duckett is pastor at Advance, and we failed to get anv report 
from him as yet. 

The work of colportage and woman's work have been discussed under 
separate reports. 

The committee thought it wise to reserve $200 to be used for special 
evangelistic and enlistment work during the past summer, but the ar- 
rangements for this work could not be made and this amount is still 
in the hands of the treasurer. 

On the whole, the results of the year's work have been encouraging, 
and we feel that the Lord is still leading. The field seems to be pretty 
well covored and the committee do not feel that it is necessary to ask 
for an advance in Associational Missions, but do recommend that the 
churches make an advance in their contributions to state missions. 

The report was followed by a thrilling address from the moderator, 
and the roll was called and the pledges for next year taken as follows: 

Louisburg $175.00 

Henderson 150.00 

Brown's 60.00 

Maple Springs 60.00 

Warrenton 60.00 

Turkey Branch 50.00 

Samaria 50.00 

Littleton 50.00 

Castalia 40.00 

Macon 45.00 

Sandy Creek 50.00 

Philadelphia 40.00 

Harris Chapel 35.00 

Cypress Chapel 27.50 

Fishing Creek 25.00 

Mount Zion 25.00 

New Bethel 25.00 

Peach Tree 25.00 

Red Bud 25.00 

Rock Spring 25.00 

Sharon 25.00 

Sulphur Springs 25.00 

12 



Warren Plains 25.00 

Bear Swamp 25.00 

Cedar Rock 25.00 

Corinth 25.00 

Bunn 25.00 

Gardner's 20.00 

Joyner's Chapel 20.00 

Norlina 20.00 

Poplar Spring 20.00 

Eeedy Creek 20.00 

South Henderson 20.00 

Enterprise 17.50 

Ephesus 15.00 

Marmaduke 15.00 

North Henderson 15.00 

Vaughn 15.00 

Mrs. Margaret Dean 12.00 

Midway 12.00 

Bethlehem 10.00 

Mount Hebron 10.00 

Mount Olive 10.00 

Social Plains 10.00 

"White Level 10.00 

Qnankie 9.50 

Centerville 5.00 

Inez 5.00 

Total $1,508.50 

After which the report was adopted. 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher report: Rock Spring; time, 
on Tuesday after first Sunday in October, 1915; to preach introductory 
sermon, S. L. Morgan; alternate, W. M. Gilmore. 
Home Missions. 

The term "home missions" is used to express the cooperative work 
that is being done throughout the Southern Baptist Convention through 
the 12 distinct special departments of the Home Mission Board, which 

located in Atlanta, Ga. 

The past year has been one of unusual progress. More than 30,000 
baptisms were reported by missionaries supported wholly or in part by 
our Home Mission Board, and more than 56,000 additions to Baptist 
churches. Another far-reaching and most promising feature of the 
board's work, which cannot be tabulated, is its development and en- 
listment work. 

With such glorious successes achieved, much larger home mission 
tasks are beckoning Southern Baptists today. There never was a time 
in the South when so much depended, as now depends, upon an alert, 
consecrated and militant missionary program. 

13 



In 1880 the population of the Soutli was 18,000,000. Of the 33,000,000 
here today, 22,000,000 make no profession of religion. If we count off 
4,00,000 who from infancy or other causes are irresponsible, there are 
still in the South today a mighty host of unsaved people equal in num- 
ber to the entire population in 1880. 

Evangelistic effort is still more succeseful in the Southern Baptist 
Convention territory than in any other part of the country, but it is 
steadily becoming more difficult in ovir territory to win people to Christ 
or to hold those who have been won to lives of service without a pro- 
gram for training and strength (>ning the life which has been implanted. 
This has its cause in the changing conditions of life in our day. Ma- 
chiHcry, transportation and intercommunication have largely broken 
up the old conditions of localism, independence and community spirit. 
Old habits and ideals are being swept away, and even the churches of 
Christ must adjust themselves to the change and learn how to make 
spiritual and to direct the new life, or else lose their leadership and 
power. These changes cry out to us for a heroic and statesmanlike 
home mission program. 

Never before in America have there been so many insidious attacks 
as there are today upon true religion. These attacks propose either a 
religion of a closed Bible, as Roman Catholics do, or a religion of a 
mutilated and grossly perverted Bible, as do Christian Science, Rus- 
sellisra and a number of other destructive faiths. These modern false 
faiths all agree in a deceitful effort to destroy the lordship and deity of 
Jesus Christ, while Romanism obscures the worship of Christ by the 
closed Bible and saint worship. 

The South is the last great stronghold and hope of the religion of 
the open Bible, and both from their peculiar doctrines and their num- 
bers Baptists have the greatest opportunity and obligation to hold 
this great section for Jesus Christ and mp.ke it a center from which 
shall go cut mighty forces of world redemption. 

The flagrant attacks upon the deity of Christ challenge every true 
preacher and every church to gird themselves for great tasks. They 
mightily challenge us to throw the whole power of our body into a 
mighty missionary campaign for Christ, in which there shall be much 
study and teaching of the Word and preaching of the Lordship of Christ 
a.nd of other Bible doctrines. Home mission and state mission churches 
have been and will continue to be not only centers of strong ienomina- 
tional spirit and of genuine progress, but they have always been and will 
always be dependable centers of loyalty to the Word of God. To 
strengthen our homo mission work is, therefore, to atrenglhen the 
tilings that tend mightily in a day of gainsayers and wolves \n sheep's 
clothing to enthrone Christ and crown Him Lord of all. 

In view, therefore, of the very essential work the Home Board is 
doing, and in view of the stupendous task yet before it, we do recom- 
mend : 

1. That 'lur chvirches be encouraged to make a larger use of the splen- 

14 



did free home mission tracts issued by tlie Homo Board, and to form 
study classes in the Board's v.ew book, "Baptist Home Missions." 

2. That clubs of subscribers be gotten in the churches for the Home 
Field. It is an exceedingly distressing and unworthy situation that 
only one Baptist preacher in five in the South gets this splendid 
magazine. 

3. We recommend that prayer be made in our churches for this great 
cause and for the saving and holding of the South for our Lord Jesus 
Christ, and that our pastors be requested to preach from time to time 
on home mission subjects. 

4. That, in order to make eifective and definite the obligations of 
the individual churches to take their full share of home mission work, 
this association assume $1,200 as its share of the state apportionment, 
and that the executive committee be authorized to apportion this 
amount fairly among the churches. 

WALTER M. GILMORE. 

Report on home missions was read by Bro. Gilmore, and after an in- 
forming address the report was adopted. 

Bro. C. J. Thomson, foreign mission secretary, was welcomed to a 
seat and addressed the body. Bro. C. E. Hoyle, of Roanoke Association, 
was invited to a seat. 

Adjourned for dinner. 

Afternoon Session. 

Bro. Morton led the association in prayer. 

Bro. Duke made statement in regard to Bro. Webb's grave, and a 
cash collection was taken to reimburse Bro. W. M. Warren and $7.10 
was given as part of balance due. 

Report on Systematic Beneficence. 

Go.i is the author of order and system. In all the movements of the 
lieavenly bodies through space, in all the processes of nature on our 
planet, God is teaching us reverence for law and order and system, 
God does nothing at random. Order is His law, sj^stem is His manner 
of working. 

Now, the highest function of the church is to embody and reveal 
to men the divine character and the divine mode of action. In con- 
ducting all its business it should observe such order and system as 
will f tly represent the God of order and system. Claiming to be the 
highest embodiment on earth of the divine character and ideals, the 
church should be, of all organizations on earth, the most scrupulously 
careful not to misrepresent God by being slipshod in transacting its 
business and raising its revenues, or indifferent and lax in meeting its 
obligations. Its moneys should all be raised v/ith the strictest regard 
for order and system, and its bills should all be paid with the most 
scrupulous promptness and carefulness. The church owes it to God 
and to the world to be the most business-like organization on earth. 

15 



But actually the church seriously misrepresents God and degrades 
and cripples itself by lack of method and system in its finances. Funds 
come into the treasury of the church and of the mission boards in- 
adequately, irregularly and often at random. Bills go unpaid. Poor 
pastors and their families are embarrassed or even suffer want. Mis- 
sionaries go without their salary, or else the boards are forced to pay 
out many thousands of dollars a year in interest. For these reasons 
the church itself justly suffers the reproach of being unbusiness-like 
and lax in its dealings. Often the fair bride of Christ degrades herself 
by begging the world for money, or by raising it through such ques- 
tionable means as suppers, bazaars and shows. 

Therefore your committee earnestly recommends the following: 

First, that every church adopt a system of weekly, or at least 
monthly, giving, both for church expenses and for benevolent objects. 

Second, that every church conduct a thorough every-member canvass, 
and secure weekly or monthly pledges to both church expenses and 
benevolences. 

Third, that every church member be virged to use in the payment of 
his subscription weekly or monthly envelopes, preferably the duplex 
envelopes, which may be secured from the Luplex Envelope and Print- 
ing Company of Richmond. 

Fourth, that all church funds for the objects of our convention be 
remitted monthly, or, in case of country churches, at least quarterly. 
Bespectfully submitted. 

S. L. MORGAN. 

Systematic beneficence next claimed the attention of the body, and 
Dr. S. L. Morgan prepared and read the report and followed same with 
an interesting address, after which same was adopted. 

Report on Foreign Missions. 

Southern Baptists are engaged in the scriptural work of giving the 
gospel to the whole wide world. They have found that the most 
effective and economical way to do this is to work tlirou-jh committees, 
called boards. There are three of these boards — the Sunday School 
Board, the Home Mission Board and the Foreign Mission Board. The 
Sunday School Board has charge of the work of furnishing literature 
to our churches and Sunday schools, and if building up Sunday schools 
in the churches and in destitute sections. It has never asked for nor 
received a cent of contributed money, but supports its own work, and 
aids the other boards, by funds received for its publications. The 
Home Mission Board has charge of the work of preaching the gospel 
in destitute sections of the South and in the Island of Cuba. The 
God-given work of preaching the gospel in the regions beyond our own 
country is committed to the Foreign IMission Board. 

The Foreign Mission Board is located at Richmond, Virgmia, and 
is composed of nineteen local mem.bors and eighteen members at 
large representing each state in co-operaticbi with the Southern 

16 



Baptist Convention. The board conducts M'ork in Italy. Brazil, Mexico, 
Japan, Argentina, China and Africa. In these countries we have 3S0 
churches, with 833 outstations, 30,000 church members and 542 Sunday 
schools, with 22,000 scholars enrolled. We have also 9,376 students 
in mission schools, 420 of whom are in the theological seminaries and 
training schools seeking specific preparation for Christian work. 

The present force of workers embraces just 300, of which number 
20 are under appointment, but have not yet sailed for their respective 
fields of labor. In addition to these home-sent missionaries we have 
on the combined fields 635 native workers. 

The work prospers on nearly all the fields; 5,252 converts were bap- 
tized last year, the largest number ever reported for a single year. 
Conditions at this time give promise of still more abundant fruits, 
if we take advantage of the opportunities opening to us everywhere. 

But our successes and our opportunities have laid responsibilities 
upon us and make insistent demands of us which we cannot ignore 
without turning much cf our success into failure and throwing away 
our God-given opportunity for still larger achievements. Multitudes 
have been made ready for the Word of Life; thousands are waiting 
training in the Christian life and for Christian service; our schools 
are overflowing; a score of consecrated young men and women are 
offering themselves to the board for the needed work, and the im- 
touched fields invite us to harvest. >Jeed and opportunity never 
combined in siich a challenge to Southern Baptists. Nothing less 
than immediate and immense enlargement can answer this challenge 
and set us in a place of great honor, usefulness and advantage for our 
gospel. 

Shall we prove ourselves worthy of so signal a favor as God is 
ready to bestow upon us? We are sufficient in numbers, capable in 
talents and leadership, and able in material resources. We can meet 
the challenge of a great opportunity if we will. 

Gifts to the work advanced $44,000 last year over the previous 
year, but one-half of our people had no part in this advance, and fre- 
quently had no part in the blessed results accomplished, and they have 
no part in the glorious rewards to be bestowed. 

Our task for the present year includes 1) the completion of the 
Judson fund; (2) the enlistment of more than one-half of our church 
members who have not yet given anything for foreign missions; (3) 
the development of present givers into larger giving; (4) the inau- 
guration in each church of a plan of systematic monthly giving and 
remitting for this cause, so that the work may be taken care of and 
debt and interest payments may be avoided. We commend these 
four objects to the thoughtful consideration of our pastors ar.d 
churches. 

In order to increase intelligence concerning this great work of the 
denomination, and to enable all our people to work together har- 

17 



moniously toward the same end, we recommend and urge that tJie 
Foreign Mission Journal be taken and read by every Baptist family with- 
in our bounds ; and to secure this so desirable an end we suggest that each 
pastor in the association appoint a committee in each church of which 
he is pastor, to canvass the membership with this object in view. A.11 
our people ought to be well informed about a work so great as this 
of giving the gospel to the lost nations, and the Journal is the pub- 
lication which the denomination uses to give this information. 

In order to carry on this great God-given work and live up to our 
obligations to our God and the lost world it is necessary for Southern 
Baptists to raise during the present conventional year $6.58,250. Oi 
this amount North Carolina Baptists have promised to raise $00,000, 
and the Tar River Association is asked to give $1,740 of this amount. 
When we take into consideration our glorious history, our numbers 
and our resources the amount asked of us is below the average. But 
we must remember that $1,740 is the least amount we Ought to give, 
and we must endeavor to go beyond it. 

In order to raise this amount it ■will be necessary for each of our 
churches to give at least the amount indicated in the following list 
which is appended that each church may know what is necessary for 
it to do if we would do our part in this work. We suggest that at 
the first meeting after the adjournment of the association the pastors 
bring thie matter before their respective churches and get them to 
agree to undertake to raise the amounts herein indicated for foreign 
missions and forward the same to Walters Durham, Raleigu, N. C, 
in monthly installments. 

Suggested amounts to be given to foreign missions during the next 
associational year: Advance, $30; Bear Swamp, $20; Bethesda, $20; 
Bethlehem, $20; Brown's, $.35; Bunn, $25; Gary Chapel, $35; Castalia, 
$20; Cedar Eoek, $20; Corinth, $50; Cypress Chapel, $15; Enterprise, 
$15; Ephesus, 10; Fishing Creek, 10; Gardner's, $30; Harris Chapel, 
$20; Henderson, $150; Joyner's Chapel, $10; Kittrell, $25; Littleton, 
$150; Louisburg, $250; Macon, .$40; Maple Springs, $20; Marmaduke, 
$10; Middlebiu'g, 30; Midway, 10; Mountain Grove, 5; Motmt Hebron, 
$5; Mount Olive, $10; Mount Zion, $10; :New Bethel, $120; New Sandy 
Creek, $15; Nortli Henderson, $15; Norlina, $20; Peach Tree, $15; 
Philadelphia, $15; Poplar Springs, $15; Quankie, $10; Red Bud, $10; 
Reedy Creek, $10; Rock Springs, $100; Samaria, $20; Sandy Creek, 
$20; Sharon, $20; South Henderson, $15; Social Plains, $5; Sulphur 
Springs, $10; Turkey Branch, $15; Vaughn, 30; Warren Plains, $30; 
Warrenton, $150; Wliite Level, $5. 

Yours for the Master, 

T. J. TAYLOR. 

Bro. T. J. Taylor read the report on foreign missions, and Bro. C. J. 
Thomson having addressed the body on same the report was adopted. 

Bro. T. S. Collie was appointed auditor. 

18 



A motion was offered by Bro. Taylor that clerk be instructed to 
notify representatives of the boards one month before meeting of 
association, and to have published in Recorder order of business. 

A motion was made by Bro. Morgan that Bro. Taylor be appointed 
to confer witli Bro. Hufham with reference to publishing history of 
association, and that Bro. Taylor proceed to publish said history, and 
a motion by Bro. May that he draw on treasurer of Ex. Com. from 
funds in his hands for that purpose for what he needs to defray 
expenses in getting out said history. Both motions were carried. 

State Missions. 

The Baptist State Convention was organized to give the gospel to 
the destitute within our borders. Move than half of our toAvn and 
city churches and many of our country churches have at some time 
been aided by the State Mission Board. Our work for the present 
year is based upon a $5.5,000 basis. This association contributed last 
year for state and associational missions $.3,032.60. This we did for the 
destitute in our own state. 

The board is at present pending more in the country distr]v;ts, and 
is receiving more from the town and city churches. 

Your committee earnestly urges that we, for the coming year, ad- 
vance at least ten per cent over our last year's contribution. We 
further recommend that prayer be offered for our state mission work 
and our missionaries regularly during the coming year. 
Respectfully submitted. 

W. E. BOWERS. 

Report on state missions was read by clerk for chairman, and after 
remarks by Bro. Gilmore the report was adopted. 

It was moved by Bro. Gilmore that $300 in hands of treasurer of 
Executive committee unexpended be turned over to Bro. Johnson for 
state missions. 

Bro. T. J. Taylor was appointed delegate to Southern Baptist Con- 
vention, and Bros. T. S. Collie, J. W. Sledge and R. S. Register be 
appointed as delegates to Baptist State Convention. 

Rev. G. M. Duke and A. G. Willcox appointed as fraternal messen- 
gers to Roanoke Association. 

Bro. Morgan offered the following resolution of thanks: 

Resolved, That the association express to this church and to the 
people of this community its hearty appreciation for the generous 
hospitality extended to us during the sessions of this body. 

Which was heartily approved. 

Tar River Association in account with A. G. Willcox, treasurer. 
October, 1913. 
Received of Finance Com.mittee for associational missions... $1,286.38 

Received of Finance Comminttee for state missions 17.50 

Received of Finance Committee for foreign missions 27.68 

19 



Received of Finance Committee for iSorlina Church 15.00 

Received of Finance Committee for orphanage 5.83 

Received of Finance Committee for minutes 81.31 

Cash 4.00 

Cash collection for orphanage 25.00 

Cash collection for aged ministers 16.60 

Received Poplar Springs for assoeiational missions 30.00 

Excess 46.41 

Total $1,555.71 

Approved. 

T. S. COLLIE, Com:iiittee. 

Disbursements. 

By amount paid Ivey Allen, assoeiational missions $1,286.38 

By amount paid Ivey Allen, Poplar Springs mission 30.00 

By amount paid Ivey Allen, excess 46.41 

By amount paid Livingston Johnson, foreign missions 27.68 

By amount paid Livingston Johnson, state missions 17.50 

By amount paid George Tunstall, Norlina Church 15.00 

By amount paid M. L. Kesler, orphanage 5.83 

By amount paid Arch Johnson, cash coll. orphanage 25.00 

By amount paid Livingston Johnson, cash coll. aged ministers 16.60 

T. R. Walker, 500 enrollment cards 1.50 

Clerk's fund 30.00 

Expenses 2.00 

Balance account last session 1.83 

Arch Johnson, printing minutes 50.00 

Total $1,555.73 

Respectfully submitted. 

A. G. WILLCOX, Treasurer. 

Treasurer of association and of the Executive Committee offered 
their reports, which, after being audited, were adopted. 

The clerk was instructed to have usual number of minutes printed 
and receive the usual compensation. 

The business of the association being finished, the moderator de- 
clared the association adjourned to meet with the church at Rock 
Spring, Franklin County, on Tuesday after first Srmday in October, 
1915, at 11 o'clock. 

G. M. DUIvE, Moderator. 
A. G. WILLCOX, Clerk and Treasurer. 

The following report